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Results 121 - 140 of 150.


Health - Social Sciences - 08.03.2018
Cultural barriers to tackling the superbug crisis
Research led by the University of Oxford has revealed how the complex cultural and social environment in developing countries can complicate the use of new diagnostic technologies to fight the global superbug crisis. The research, led by Dr Marco J Haenssgen at the CABDyN Complexity Centre and the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health,  involved a new finger-prick blood test (C-reactive protein) to help nurses and doctors decide whether their patients need antibiotic treatment.

Social Sciences - Media - 08.03.2018
On Twitter, false news travels faster than true stories
A new study by three MIT scholars has found that false news spreads more rapidly on the social network Twitter than real news does - and by a substantial margin. "We found that falsehood defuses significantly farther, faster, deeper, and more broadly than the truth, in all categories of information, and in many cases by an order of magnitude," says Sinan Aral, a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management and co-author of a new paper detailing the findings.

Social Sciences - Health - 05.03.2018
Household immigration status may impact Medicaid enrollment, study finds
Individuals who are eligible for Medicaid and living in households with undocumented immigrants appear less likely to enroll in the public health insurance program in some states, a new study by the Yale School of Public Health finds. Published in the March issue of Health Affairs , the study shines light on why approximately one in four of the uninsured in the United States was eligible for, but not enrolled in, the Medicaid program in 2016 - two years after expansions of Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act.

Health - Social Sciences - 05.03.2018
Restoring Vacant Lots Reduces Gun Violence and Crime, Increases Neighborhood Safety
Restoring Vacant Lots Reduces Gun Violence and Crime, Increases Neighborhood Safety
In cities across the United States, about 15 percent of land is considered vacant or abandoned. These areas can foster criminal activity, and urban residents, especially those in low-income neighborhoods, often view vacant land as a threat to their health and safety. A new study from the University of Pennsylvania , Columbia University, the University of California, Los Angeles, Rutgers University, and the U.S. Forest Service found that remediating these spaces can have a dramatic effect on both the perceptions of crime and vandalism and on the acts themselves.

Health - Social Sciences - 05.03.2018
Need for early support among people with uveal melanoma
FINDINGS UCLA researchers found that nearly all people diagnosed with uveal melanoma had a number of unmet psychological and health information needs, particularly during the first three months after their diagnoses. The study is the first to examine long-term supportive care needs among patients with this disease, and suggested there are more acute needs among people with uveal melanoma than people with other cancers.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 05.03.2018
Dying for the group: what motivates the ultimate sacrifice?
Whether idolised as heroes or demonised and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why?  Previous theories of extreme self-sacrifice have revealed that a range of factors fuel the decision, including collective identity, hostility from others outside of the group, kin psychology and in some cases diminished mental health and depression.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 05.03.2018
Mammals share mechanisms controlling the heart with a 400 million-year-old fish
School-based healthy lifestyle interventions alone are not effective in the fight against childhood obesity, researchers at the University of Birmingham have warned. The warning comes after one of the largest childhood obesity prevention trials undertaken to date has found that a healthy lifestyle intervention carried out in dozens of schools did not lead to significant changes in pupils' weight.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.02.2018
The weight of racism: Daily onslaught of ’vigilance’ affects health of black women
Video ANN ARBOR-When black women report high levels of vigilance-chronic, daily worry about having to encounter prejudice-their health suffers. There's a difference between discrimination and vigilance, says Margaret Hicken, director of the U-M RacismLab. Discrimination entails day-to-day instances of prejudice whereas vigilance is a never-ending, daily anticipation of discrimination or prejudice.

Social Sciences - 26.02.2018
Infants expect favoritism over fairness
Stanford scholar Lin Bian found that in times of plenty infants expect fair distribution of goodies like toys or cookies. But when resources are scarce, infants expect people to favor their own social group Stanford scholar Lin Bian looks at how infants and toddlers rank moral principles of fairness and group loyalty.

Art and Design - Social Sciences - 15.02.2018
Play it again: People find comfort listening to the same songs over and over
ANN ARBOR-With the frequency that some people play their favorite song, it's a good thing vinyl records aren't used often because they might wear out. University of Michigan researchers have found that people enjoy replaying a favorite song many times even after the novelty and surprise are gone. In a new study, participants reported listening to their favorite song hundreds of times.

Social Sciences - Health - 09.02.2018
Name Use Matters for Transgender Youths’ Mental Health
In a recent study, researchers found that the risk of depression and suicide in transgender youths falls when they are allowed to use their chosen name. AUSTIN, Texas - In one of the largest and most diverse studies of transgender youths to date, researchers led by a team at The University of Texas at Austin have found that when transgender youths are allowed to use their chosen name in places such as work, school and at home, their risk of depression and suicide drops.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.02.2018
The connection between a healthy marriage and a healthy heart
For many, marriage signals the beginning of an entwined and, at times, tangled relationship. Spouses often play the role of friend, co-parent, caregiver, financial partner and emotional support system for their significant other. Given the amount of time spouses spend together, it makes sense that the quality of your marriage would correlate with your physical health.

Social Sciences - 06.02.2018
LISTEN: Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia
LISTEN: Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia
A previously unknown language has been found in the Malay Peninsula by linguists from Lund University in Sweden. The language has been given the name Jedek. "Documentation of endangered minority languages such as Jedek is important, as it provides new insights into human cognition and culture", says Joanne Yager, doctoral student at Lund University.

Social Sciences - Health - 05.02.2018
Social isolation health message fails to cut through
Social isolation health message fails to cut through
Social isolation has been shown to pose a greater health threat than smoking, poor diet and lack of exercise - but that message is failing to get through to the community. However, a new study led by University of Queensland School of Psychology researcher Professor Alex Haslam shows that people remain largely unaware of the importance of social connectedness for health.

Health - Social Sciences - 01.02.2018
0.5 Percent of the Population Suffer from Severe Psychological Trauma
0.5 Percent of the Population Suffer from Severe Psychological Trauma
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can sometimes occur in a particularly severe form, known as complex post-traumatic stress disorder.

Social Sciences - 30.01.2018
Safeguarding children when sentencing mothers
Oxford University have collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment. Image credit: Shutterstock Oxford University has collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment.

Health - Social Sciences - 30.01.2018
Dating Partners More Violent and Account for More Domestic Violence Than Spouses
Tuesday, January 30, 2018 Federal regulations designed to keep guns away from abusive partners, like the Violence Against Women Act, do not currently apply to dating relationships. But new research from the University of Pennsylvania published in the journal Preventive Medicine reveals that they likely should.

Politics - Social Sciences - 29.01.2018
Sociologist’s research on Filipino leader reveals insights into populist politics
By many accounts, Joseph Estrada had a lackluster record of helping the poor in the Philippines. The former president was ousted in 2001 and later convicted of plunder for stealing $80 million from the government. Nevertheless, the urban poor in Manila have continued to support the former film actor, who ran for president in 2010 after being pardoned.

Social Sciences - Health - 25.01.2018
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London involving UCL. The study, analysed questionnaire and interview data from the Determinants of young Adult Social well-being and Health (DASH) study, the UK's largest longitudinal study of ethnically diverse young people.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.01.2018
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London. Published in PLOS ONE , the study analysed questionnaire and interview data from the Determinants of young Adult Social well-being and Health (DASH) study, one of the UK's largest longitudinal studies of ethnically diverse young people.