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Social Sciences - Health - 19.08.2018
New Model Emphasizes Social Network Communities Rather Than Connections - News - Carnegie Mellon University
Carnegie Mellon University Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Radu Marculescu has co-authored a paper in Nature Scientific Reports outlining a new model for how social networks change and develop over time. The research was conducted in collaboration with Mihai Udrescu and Alex Topirceanu of the Computer Science Department of the Politehnica University of Timi ş oara, Romania.

Health - Social Sciences - 14.08.2018
The inequalities of prenatal stress
Stanford study found that economically disadvantaged children prenatally exposed to an environmental stressor had much lower cognitive abilities than their counterparts who didn't experience the stress. No effect was found among children in upperor middle-class families. Exposure to an acute stress in utero can have long-term consequences extending into childhood - but only among children in poor households, according to a new Stanford study that looked at the long-term impact of acute, parental stress.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 13.08.2018
Cycling is the healthiest way to get around cities
Cycling has been found to bring both the best physical and mental health benefits in a study carried out in seven European cities. People who cycled in cities were found to have better self-perceived general health, better mental health, greater vitality, lower self-perceived stress and fewer feelings of loneliness.

Health - Social Sciences - 10.08.2018
Men take care of their spouses just as well as women
Men take care of their spouses just as well as women
Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 09.08.2018
'Believing you're a winner' gives men a testosterone boost and promiscuous disposition
’Believing you’re a winner’ gives men a testosterone boost and promiscuous disposition
New findings suggest that the male body tries to "optimise" self-perceived improvements in social status through hormonal shifts that promote "short-term mating". Our results show that both testosterone and its corresponding psychological effects can fluctuate quickly and opportunistically Danny Longman A new study shows that men only have to believe they've bested another man in competition to get raised testosterone levels and an inflated sense of their own value as a sexual prospect.

Health - Social Sciences - 09.08.2018
Race and research: How public health experts can reduce racial bias in their work
Race and research: How public health experts can reduce racial bias in their work
Stephanie Cajigal How can public health researchers address racism? That's the focus of a supplement to the latest issue of the journal Ethnicity & Disease, for which UCLA professor Chandra Ford served as a guest editor.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.08.2018
Likelihood of dementia higher among black ethnic groups
Likelihood of dementia higher among black ethnic groups
Rates of dementia diagnosis are higher among black ethnic groups compared to white and Asian groups in the UK, a new UCL-led study has found. The study, published in Clinical Epidemiology , is the first to compare incidence of dementia diagnosis by ethnicity in any nationally representative sample. Researchers from UCL and King's College London analysed data from 2,511,681 people, including 66,083 who had a dementia diagnosis, from The Health Improvement Network primary care database between 2007 and 2015.

Social Sciences - Sport - 07.08.2018
Football used as scapegoat for domestic violence
Football used as scapegoat for domestic violence
7 August 2018 Scapegoating football as a trigger for domestic violence trivialises the issue and risks offering offenders an excuse for their behaviour, according to a UK study. Reports linking a spike in cases with the outcome of Old Firm games and England's World Cup performance lack reliable data and fail to recognise abuse is a pattern of ongoing behaviour.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 06.08.2018
How art changes the brain
Can art change the brain? In a word: yes. A panel of scientists and art practitioners came together to connect the dots between creativity and neuroplasticity at a Sydney Ideas event during Innovation Week. We brought together neuroscientists, artists and philanthropists to discuss why creativity is beneficial for humanity.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 06.08.2018
Mice's individuality is influenced by their relations
Mice’s individuality is influenced by their relations
Individuality is not exclusive to humans. Though this idea was previously rebutted by biologists, today it is accepted that individuality is found in all animal species. It is defined as all the behavior differences between individuals of a single species that are relatively stable over time. Though the process called individuation is supported by genetic and development components, researchers have just demonstrated in mice that the social environment and activity of some neurons also participate in determining the emergence of distinct individuals.

Social Sciences - Politics - 01.08.2018
Differences in social status and politics encourage paranoid thinking
Differences in social status and political belief increase paranoid interpretations of other people's actions, finds a new UCL experimental study. Paranoia is the tendency to assume other people are trying to harm you when their actual motivations are unclear, and this tendency is increased when interacting with someone of a higher social status or opposing political beliefs, according to the study published today in Royal Society Open Science .

Innovation - Social Sciences - 01.08.2018
Finding innovative solutions to fuel poverty
A team at Cardiff University is working to address the issue of fuel poverty in Wales. The Understanding Risk group, which brings together staff from the Schools of Psychology and Social Sciences, is leading Fair Futures, a Welsh Government commissioned project, with the Energy Systems Catapult as partner.

Social Sciences - Philosophy - 26.07.2018
New research uncovers successes and failures of UK’s help for Syrian immigrants
Syrian refugees have higher levels of unemployment than UK citizens, are often overqualified for work they do find, and are being underserved by current British immigration policy despite their eagerness to contribute to society, new research reveals. A new report from a multidisciplinary research team at the University of Glasgow, supported by the Global Challenges Research Fund, offers unique insight into the lives of Syrian refugees based in the UK and how their experiences compare with refugees settled in Lebanon and Greece.

Economics / Business - Social Sciences - 26.07.2018
Parents inclined to invest more, if child attends better quality school
Parents consider that spending money on learning resources such as books, educational games and private tuition for their children is more productive if the child attends a higher quality school, according to new research led by UCL. The study, which recently came out as a Human Capital and Economic Opportunity ( HCEO) Working Paper, was funded by the Nuffield Foundation.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 25.07.2018
Ability to identify genuine laughter transcends culture, UCLA-led study finds
Ability to identify genuine laughter transcends culture, UCLA-led study finds
People across cultures and continents are largely able to tell the difference between a fake laugh and a real one, according to a new study by UCLA communication researcher Greg Bryant. For almost a decade, Bryant, a professor of communication in the UCLA College , has studied the nature of laughter — and what it reveals about the evolution of human communication and cooperation.

Social Sciences - Philosophy - 25.07.2018
Is storytelling bad for science?
Is storytelling bad for science?
Science can't exist without telling a story. The question is not whether we should use it, but how we should use it best, writes Professor Nick Enfield. Scientists often struggle to communicate the findings of research. Our subject matter can be technical and not easily digested by a general audience.

Social Sciences - Economics / Business - 23.07.2018
More than two thirds of Chinese take a positive view of social credit systems in their country
Team of scholars at Freie Universität Berlin surveyed 2,200 citizens/ Particularly high level of approval among older and better educated No 198/2018 from Jul 23, 2018 About 80 percent of Chinese internet users take a positive view of the governmental and commercial social credit systems in their country.

Social Sciences - Environment - 23.07.2018
Warming climate will likely boost suicide rates worldwide
As global temperatures rise because of climate change, suicide rates are likely to rise as well, according to a new analysis by Stanford University and UC Berkeley researchers. The study, published today , concluded that projected temperature increases over the next few decades could lead to an additional 21,000 suicides in the United States and Mexico by 2050.

Social Sciences - Environment - 23.07.2018
Warming temperatures linked to increased suicide rates
By comparing historical temperature and suicide data, researchers found a strong correlation between warm weather and increased suicides. They estimate climate change could lead to suicide rate increases across the U.S. and Mexico. Suicide rates are likely to rise as the earth warms, according to new research published July 23 in Nature Climate Change .

Economics / Business - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Immigrant pupils more likely to think school can help them succeed than UK-born peers
Pupils who have immigrated to the UK have a significantly more positive attitude towards school than their peers whose parents were born here, new research has revealed. Experts from the University of Bristol and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) analysed data from over 4,500 pupils aged 15 and 16 in 204 schools in England* and found immigration status is a key driver of attitude.