news 2018

« BACK

Social Sciences



Results 81 - 100 of 150.


Social Sciences - 06.06.2018
Male Vervet Monkeys Use Punishment and Coercion to De-Escalate Intergroup Fights
Male Vervet Monkeys Use Punishment and Coercion to De-Escalate Intergroup Fights
Social species engage in a number of cooperative activities including hunting, raising offspring, defending the group against predators, and fighting with neighboring groups.

Law - Social Sciences - 04.06.2018
Call for papers Journal for Law, Social Justice and Global Development
Inleiding: LGD is an international, peer reviewed, multidisciplinary journal and has historically carried articles which cover a range of perspectives and approaches. It has a particular focus on encouraging scholars from the Global South to submit papers. The Journal of Law, Social Justice and Global Development is an international, peer reviewed, multidisciplinary journal.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.06.2018
Marriage equality votes a key to LGB health disadvantage
UQ research has revealed that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) Australians suffer more health problems in areas where most people voted against same-sex marriage. The study - among the first of its kind conducted outside the US - linked HILDA Survey data from 15,000 people to electorate level same-sex marriage postal vote results.

Social Sciences - Health - 01.06.2018
Older men with higher levels of sex hormones could be less religious
New research indicates that the amount of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a man's body may influence how religious he is The level of sex hormones such as testosterone in a man's body could influence his religiosity. A new study by Aniruddha Das of McGill University in the Springer journal  Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology  adds to the growing body of evidence that religiosity is influenced not only by upbringing or psychological makeup, but that physiological factors could also play a role.

Social Sciences - 31.05.2018
Poorer sexual health outcomes for young people in care
Young people in foster care in Wales experience poorer sexual health outcomes, research at Cardiff University has found. Dr Louise Roberts, based in the School of Social Sciences, led on the research paper, which was a collaboration between the Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer) and the Children's Social Care Research and Development Centre (CASCADE).

Social Sciences - 31.05.2018
Welfare opposition linked to threats of racial standing
Researchers find that when white Americans perceive threats to their status as the dominant demographic group, their resentment of minorities increases. This resentment leads to opposing welfare programs they believe will mainly benefit minority groups. White Americans' attitudes toward welfare are influenced by information about demographic standing, says Stanford sociologist Robb Willer in a new paper set to publish May 31 in the social research journal Social Forces .

Social Sciences - 30.05.2018
New mums' voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex study
New mums’ voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex study
New mums' voices get lower after pregnancy, shows a University of Sussex study The pitch of new mothers' voices temporarily drops after they have had their first baby, according to a new longitudinal study by Dr Kasia Pisanski, Kavya Bhardwaj, and Prof David Reby at the University of Sussex. The researchers analysed women's voices over a 10-year period - five years before and five years after childbirth - and found that new mothers' voices get lower, and become more monotonous after pregnancy.

Social Sciences - 30.05.2018
Welfare backlash tied to white fear of declining status
Welfare backlash tied to white fear of declining status
White Americans' fear of losing their socioeconomic standing in the face of demographic change may be driving opposition to welfare programs, even though whites are major beneficiaries of government poverty assistance, according to new research from UC Berkeley and Stanford University.

Health - Social Sciences - 29.05.2018
Some same sex attracted women avoid treatment for alcohol problems
Same sex attracted women (SSAW) have higher alcohol and mental health problem rates than heterosexual women but many do not access or are not satisfied with treatment, a University of Melbourne-led study has found. Published in the UK Royal College of General Practitioners' journal  BJGP Open , the study involved researchers from the University of Melbourne, La Trobe University, Columbia University, Royal Melbourne Hospital and Monash University.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 24.05.2018
Numbers about inequality don’t speak for themselves
Statistics on racial disparities should be paired with context, emphasis on importance of institutional policy in shaping inequality, Stanford scholars say In a new research paper, Stanford scholars Rebecca Hetey and Jennifer Eberhardt propose new ways to talk about racial disparities. Using statistics to inform the public about racial disparities can backfire.

Administration - Social Sciences - 23.05.2018
Government's grammar school funding won't improve children's outcomes
Government’s grammar school funding won’t improve children’s outcomes
Grammar school pupils do not gain any advantage over children who do not attend a grammar school by age 14, according to a new study from UCL. In the first study of its kind, researchers from the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) looked at a range of social and emotional outcomes, including young people's engagement and well-being at school, their aspirations for the future, in addition to educational attainment levels, to determine the benefits of attending a grammar school.

Social Sciences - Administration - 23.05.2018
Unspoken cooperation more important than saying ’thank you’
New research from the University of Sydney has found people around the world usually don't say 'thank you' when someone fulfils a simple request. The findings suggest there is an unspoken willingness by most people to cooperate with others. The research, published in  Royal Society Open Science ,   examined almost 1000 examples from informal, everyday conversations between friends, families and neighbours in eight different languages.

Social Sciences - 22.05.2018
Ethnically mixed schools better for social cohesion, says new study of teenagers' attitudes
Ethnically mixed schools better for social cohesion, says new study of teenagers’ attitudes
Pupils from schools with greater ethnic diversity have more positive feelings towards pupils of different ethnicities, according to a new study of attitudes in English secondary schools from the University of Bristol and the London School of Economics and Political Science. While pupils tend to have warmer feelings for their own ethnic group, the more mixed the school, the warmer the feelings for other ethnicities, promoting social cohesion.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 14.05.2018
Spoilt for choice? How neuroscience can explain your attitude toward freedom of choice
Spoilt for choice? How neuroscience can explain your attitude toward freedom of choice
Being spoilt for choice can be a burden or a blessing: People value their freedom of choice differently. Whereas some people happily let others make decisions for them, others might rebel against restrictions of their freedom of choice. Scientists from the University of Bern have now been able to explain the individual attitude toward freedom of choice based on brain activations.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 09.05.2018
Microbes are savvy investors when contributing to the common good
Microbes change their investment strategy depending on how much they have at stake Last updated on Monday 10 September 2018 Scientists investigating the fundamental question in biology as to why individuals have evolved to cooperate rather than simply exploiting the contributions of their rivals, have found that microbes vary their contribution to maximise the return of investment.

Media - Social Sciences - 03.05.2018
What’s in a name: how language influences our perception of suicide
Communication scientists show that word choice in media reports on suicide has a measurable impact on public opinion. In an empirical study published in Social Science & Medicine , an international team of researchers from the University of Munich, KU Leuven and the Medical University of Vienna show that the specific German word used in media reports of suicides has a measurable impact on how readers perceive and evaluate the act of suicide.

Social Sciences - 02.05.2018
Seeking the truth on female genital cutting
Seeking the truth on female genital cutting
A new study by anthropologists at the University of Bristol will help campaigners to closely target their work in eradicating female genital cutting (FGC). The World Health Organisation report that an estimated three million girls are at risk every year of having their genitals cut in some way, mostly before the age of 15.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.04.2018
Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefits
Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefits
Want to prevent kids from using drugs and make it stick into young adulthood? Get the community involved and intervene before they're teens, say researchers from the University of Washington. A new, longitudinal study from the UW Social Development Research Group shows that young adults who grew up in communities that used a coordinated, science-based approach to prevention were more likely to have abstained from substance use, violence and other antisocial behaviors through age 21.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.04.2018
Parenting Groups Can Improve Child Development
Parenting Groups Can Improve Child Development
Parenting groups in rural communities can improve early childhood development in low-resource settings. These are the findings of a study conducted by Swiss TPH in collaboration with the Boston University and partners in Zambia. The study Many children in lowand middle-income countries do not reach their developmental potential due to malnutrition, infectious diseases and a lack of appropriate stimulation and learning opportunities in their home environment.

Health - Social Sciences - 23.04.2018
Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxiety, study suggests
Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxiety, study suggests
People who feel in control of their lives and who find purpose and meaning in life are less likely to have anxiety disorders even when going through the toughest times, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge.