News 2019

Health - Jan 17
A new study examining UK housing data and health outcomes has indicated a link between people living in the private rental sector having higher levels of a stress hormone. The findings, led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Essex, are published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
Health - Jan 17
Health

A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells — which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab — into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells.

Health - Jan 17

Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found.

Materials Science - Jan 17
Materials Science

Researchers have devised a way to deposit metals onto fabrics and used it to insert sensors and batteries into these materials.

Physics - Jan 17
Physics

Berkeley Lab researcher leads effort to take specialized superconducting sensor-making processes into commercial production.


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Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2019
Finds elevated levels of stress hormone linked to housing type and tenure
A new study examining UK housing data and health outcomes has indicated a link between people living in the private rental sector having higher levels of a stress hormone. The findings, led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Essex, are published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2019
Scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting'T cells
Scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting’T cells
A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells — which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab — into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells. The technique uses structures called artificial thymic organoids, which work by mimicking the environment of the thymus, the organ in which T cells develop from blood stem cells.

Materials Science - Innovation / Technology - 17.01.2019
Smart fabrics made possible by new metal deposition technique
Smart fabrics made possible by new metal deposition technique
Researchers have devised a way to deposit metals onto fabrics and used it to insert sensors and batteries into these materials. A multidisciplinary team of researchers from Imperial College London led by Dr Firat Güder from the Department of Bioengineering have developed an innovative technique to print metals such as silver, gold and platinum onto natural fabrics.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2019
New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis and save the NHS money
Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found. In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.01.2019
Scientists Team Up With Industry to Mass-Produce Detectors for Next-Gen Cosmic Experiment
Scientists Team Up With Industry to Mass-Produce Detectors for Next-Gen Cosmic Experiment
Berkeley Lab researcher leads effort to take specialized superconducting sensor-making processes into commercial production Chasing clues about the infant universe in relic light known as the cosmic microwave background, or CMB, scientists are devising more elaborate and ultrasensitive detector arrays to measure the properties of this light with increasing precision.

Life Sciences - 17.01.2019
Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males
Researchers in the Department of Zoology at Oxford University have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection - before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.01.2019
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Technologies like artificial intelligence, sensor networks and advances in mapping are driving the work Amy Akmal The 1994 Northridge earthquake was one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. Fifty-seven people died, more than 8,700 were injured, and property damages amounted to billions of dollars.

Life Sciences - 16.01.2019
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
Using the fossil and fossilized footprints of a 300-million-year-old animal, an interdisciplinary team that includes scientists from EPFL and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin have developed a method for identifying the most likely gaits of extinct animals and designed a robot that can recreate their walk.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2019
For 35 years, the Pacific Ocean has largely spared West's mountain snow from effects of global warming
For 35 years, the Pacific Ocean has largely spared West’s mountain snow from effects of global warming
A new study has found that a pattern of ocean temperatures and atmospheric circulation has offset most of the impact of global warming on mountain snowpack in the western U.S. since the 1980s. The study from Oregon State University, the University of Washington and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was published Jan.

Business / Economics - 16.01.2019
Nudging Does Not Necessarily Improve Decisions
Nudging Does Not Necessarily Improve Decisions
Nudging, the concept of influencing people's behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and itis often viewed as a one-size-fits-all solution. Now, a study by researchers from the University of Zurich puts things into perspective: Whether a nudge really does improve decisions depends on a person's underlying decision-making process.

Materials Science - 16.01.2019
Say 'bye bye' to faulty mobile phones and solar cells
Say ’bye bye’ to faulty mobile phones and solar cells
Faulty mobile phones and solar cells could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a ground-breaking invention developed at The Australian National University (ANU). Engineers have developed a powerful new tool to help manufacturers spot defects or unwanted features in everyday technology - such as mobile phones, batteries and solar cells - more easily and much earlier in the fabrication process.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2019
New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe
New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe
New research, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the eating habits of Neolithic people living in southeastern Europe using food residues from pottery extracts dating back more than 8,000 years. With the dawn of the Neolithic age, farming became established across Europe and people turned their back on aquatic resources, a food source more typical of the earlier Mesolithic period, instead preferring to eat meat and dairy products from domesticated animals.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.01.2019
Biodiversity research at Stanford
Truly grasping the importance of biodiversity means diving down into the microscopic organisms in our soils and out to human social relationships affecting our ecosystems. The more we know, the better we can address threats to species diversity. As simple as it is to understand the concept of biodiversity - the variety of species in an ecosystem - the reality is mind-blowingly complex.

Social Sciences - 16.01.2019
Wales imprisonment rate highest in Western Europe
Wales has the highest imprisonment rate in Western Europe, according to research by Cardiff University's Wales Governance Centre. ‘Sentencing and Immediate Custody in Wales: A Factfile', published today (Wednesday Jan 16) provides a detailed statistical comparison of sentencing and immediate custody figures in Wales and England.

Materials Science - Health - 16.01.2019
Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity
Mechanism helps explain the ear’s exquisite sensitivity
A critical gel-like structure in the inner ear moves according to a sound's frequency, researchers find. The human ear, like those of other mammals, is so extraordinarily sensitive that it can detect sound-wave-induced vibrations of the eardrum that move by less than the width of an atom. Now, researchers at MIT have discovered important new details of how the ear achieves this amazing ability to pick up faint sounds.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.01.2019
Researcher uses big data to help optimize cancer treatment
In this Q&A, Paul Boutros explains how scientists take data, such as DNA sequencing, to design personal treatments Denise Heady Treating cancer is incredibly complex and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But, there is something that can help physicians create treatments customized for individuals: big data.

Health - 15.01.2019
Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels
Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels
New research by the University of Bristol in collaboration with Medical Detection Dogs has found that the best trained alert dogs have the potential to vastly improve the quality of life of people living with Type 1 diabetes. As reported in PLOS One , on average trained dogs alerted their owners to 83 per cent of hypoglycaemic episodes in over 4,000 hypoand hyper-glycaemic episodes that were examined.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 15.01.2019
International collaboration publishes concept design for a post-LHC future circular collider at CERN
International collaboration publishes concept design for a post-LHC future circular collider at CERN
Geneva. Today, the Future Circular Collider (FCC) collaboration submitted its Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for publication, a four-volume document that presents the different options for a large circular collider of the future. It showcases the great physics opportunities offered by machines of unprecedented energy and intensity and describes the technical challenges, cost and schedule for realisation.

Environment - 15.01.2019
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research, involving researchers from Cardiff University, has revealed that gardens and allotments are good for pollinators, and lavender and borage are important garden plants that pollinators use as food sources.

Innovation / Technology - 15.01.2019
Technology use explains at most 0.4% of adolescent wellbeing
A study of 300,000 adolescents and parents in the UK and USA shows that only 0.4% of wellbeing in adolescents is associated with technology use. Comparatively, eating potatoes has nearly as negative effect and wearing glasses has a more negative effect on adolescent mental health then screen use.
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