News 2019

Physics - Dec 7
Physics
Researchers at EPFL have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. This tiny quantum effect influences the way water molecules interact with one another. Yet, it can lead to drastic changes in large-scale observations.
Astronomy - Dec 6

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is going closer to the sun than any spacecraft has been before - Dr Daniel Verscharen (UCL Space & Climate Physics) writes about the findings so far. If you ask a child to paint a picture of the sun, you will most likely get a bright yellow circle on a piece of paper.

Environment - Dec 6

With 2019 on track to be one of the warmest years on record, a major new study reveals the impact of warming temperatures on Arctic vegetation, animal species, and human communities who rely on the stability of the Arctic food chain to survive.

Health - Dec 6
Health

Personalised blood vessel testing kit could unravel causes and treatments for heart attack, stroke and vascular dementia, find scientists.

Physics - Dec 6

After decades of miniaturization, the electronic components we've relied on for computers and modern technologies are now starting to reach fundamental limits.


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Physics - Chemistry - 07.12.2019
Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water
Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water
Researchers at EPFL have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. This tiny quantum effect influences the way water molecules interact with one another. Yet, it can lead to drastic changes in large-scale observations.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.12.2019
Analysis: A spacecraft is starting to unravel the sun’s biggest mysteries
NASA's Parker Solar Probe is going closer to the sun than any spacecraft has been before - Dr Daniel Verscharen (UCL Space & Climate Physics) writes about the findings so far. If you ask a child to paint a picture of the sun, you will most likely get a bright yellow circle on a piece of paper. This is actually quite accurate, given that the sun is a ball of hot gas and that its surface (called the photosphere) mostly shines in bright yellow light.

Health - 06.12.2019
Grow your own blood vessel model in a dish
Grow your own blood vessel model in a dish
Personalised blood vessel testing kit could unravel causes and treatments for heart attack, stroke and vascular dementia, find scientists. Researchers can now grow a model of a patient's blood vessel wall in a dish from a small sample of their blood. The technology could be used to create personalised testing kits for new drugs and advance research into diseases of the blood vessels including stroke, heart attack and vascular dementia.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.12.2019
The Arctic’s changing landscape: Impact on plants, animals, livelihoods and global temperatures
With 2019 on track to be one of the warmest years on record, a major new study reveals the impact of warming temperatures on Arctic vegetation, animal species, and human communities who rely on the stability of the Arctic food chain to survive. The study, published today in Science Advances by an international team of researchers, reports that the Arctic has warmed by 0.75 Celsius in the last decade.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.12.2019
In surprise breakthrough, scientists create quantum states in everyday electronics
After decades of miniaturization, the electronic components we've relied on for computers and modern technologies are now starting to reach fundamental limits. Faced with this challenge, engineers and scientists around the world are turning toward a radically new paradigm: quantum information technologies. Quantum technology, which harnesses the strange rules that govern particles at the atomic level, is normally thought of as much too delicate to coexist with the electronics we use every day in phones, laptops and cars.

Health - 06.12.2019
One third of premature deaths linked to social inequality
Nearly 900,000 deaths in England could have been avoided in a more equal society, according to a UCL study of 2.5 million premature deaths over the last 16 years. The study, published today in The Lancet Public Health , found that one in three deaths before the age of 75 are attributable to socio-economic and regional health inequalities.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.12.2019
Electronic map reveals 'rules of the road' in superconductor
Electronic map reveals ’rules of the road’ in superconductor
Band structure map exposes iron selenide's enigmatic electronic signature Using a clever technique that causes unruly crystals of iron selenide to snap into alignment, Rice University physicists have drawn a detailed map that reveals the "rules of the road” for electrons both in normal conditions and in the critical moments just before the material transforms into a superconductor.

Environment - 06.12.2019
Reduced soil tilling helps both soils and yields
By monitoring crops through machine learning and satellite data, Stanford scientists have found farms that till the soil less can increase yields of corn and soybeans and improve the health of the soil - a win-win for meeting growing food needs worldwide. Agriculture degrades over 24 million acres of fertile soil every year, raising concerns about meeting the rising global demand for food.

Health - 06.12.2019
Tick box questionnaire could significantly improve oesophageal cancer survival rates
A simple health questionnaire could be a highly effective tool to pre-screen people for early signs of oesophageal cancer, enabling much earlier diagnosis and treatment, finds a UCL-led study. The research, published in Lancet Digital Health , used artificial intelligence to analyse a large oesophageal cancer dataset, known as BEST2 (1,299 patients), to establish which health factors were common in those individuals who had Barrett's oesophagus.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.12.2019
How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?
Plant leaves harbor a diverse microbial community, as seen in this plate of agar stamped with the leaf of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant. After incubating for two days, the bacteria from the leaf grew into visible colonies. (Photo courtesy of Britt Koskella lab) Scientists are homing in on what a healthy human microbiome looks like, mapping the normal bacteria that live in and on the healthy human body.

Astronomy / Space Science - Academic Rankings - 06.12.2019
Researchers named among world's best
Researchers named among world’s best
Durham researchers named among world's best At Durham we've long had a global reputation for the high standard and impact of our research. Now we're celebrating because five of our researchers have been named among the world's best for the quality and influence of their work. The researchers are investigating the origins of the universe, nature-based answers to climate change, and the make-up of the Earth's crust.

Earth Sciences - Materials Science - 06.12.2019
Gaining insight into the energy balance of earthquakes
Gaining insight into the energy balance of earthquakes
Researchers at EPFL's Computational Solid Mechanics Laboratory and the Weizmann Institute of Science have modeled the onset of slip between two bodies in frictional contact. Their work, a major step forward in the study of frictional rupture, could give us a better understanding of earthquakes - including how far and fast they travel.

Psychology - 06.12.2019
’Depression in pregnancy alters male infant behaviour - but mothers don’t notice’
Women who have symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy do not report concerns with their infant sons' behaviour - but do with daughters, a Cardiff University study has found. As many as one in four women experience depression and/or anxiety in pregnancy and evidence suggests it can increase the risk of emotional and behavioural issues, particularly in boys.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.12.2019
Patients at risk because NHS hospitals using different record-keeping systems
A major survey of medical record keeping in the NHS has revealed critical deficiencies that could risk patients' safety. Researchers at the Institute of Global Health Innovation (IGHI) at Imperial College London, found NHS Trusts were using at least 21 different electronic medical record systems which are unable to effectively share information.

Health - 06.12.2019
Domestic abuse survivors twice at risk of long-term illnesses
Female survivors of domestic abuse are at double the risk of developing long-term illnesses that cause widespread bodily pain and extreme tiredness, shows a study by the Universities of Birmingham and Warwick. Published today in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence , the research shows that women who have experienced domestic abuse are almost twice as likely to develop fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) than those who have not.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.12.2019
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research. A team led by Oregon State University and including Imperial College London scientists found that sensitivity to forest fragmentation - the breakup of forests by human activities like logging or farming - increased six-fold at low versus high latitudes, putting tropical species at greater risk of extinction.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.12.2019
Delirium linked to brain injury after severe surgery
In a new study published today [Dec. 5, 2019] in the journal Brain, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health have discovered that delirium following severe surgery may be associated with brain injury. "For a long time it has been thought that delirium, a state of confusion that can arise in sick patients, may lead to dementia and long-term cognitive problems," says study leader Robert Sanders, assistant professor of anesthesiology at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.

Physics - Chemistry - 05.12.2019
SLAC scientists invent a way to see attosecond electron motions with an X-ray laser
SLAC Overview Our Mission, Vision & Values SLAC By The Numbers Director's Office Past SLAC Directors and Deputy Directors Wolfgang (Pief) K. H.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.12.2019
Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming - study
Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming - study
Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects - a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals. Scientists' calculations based on how carbon-based greenhouse gas levels link to movements of magma just below earth's surface suggest that such geological change has caused the largest temporary global warming of the past 65 million years.

Pharmacology - Health - 05.12.2019
Reveals dramatic rise in patients ’cured’ of heart condition following GP performance pay scheme
The introduction of a performance-related financial incentive scheme for GPs led to a dramatic almost five-fold rise in the number of patients whose heart rhythm condition was said to have been ‘cured', say University of Birmingham researchers. Academics at the University of Birmingham's Institute of Applied Health Research, supported by NIHR ARC West Midlands, conducted a study into patients with the most common heart rhythm condition, called atrial fibrillation.
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