News 2019

Health - May 21
Health
By understanding how day-night alternation affects the effect of insulin in tissues, researchers at UNIGE are highlighting the role of circadian rhythms in diabetes. The disruption of our internal clocks seems to play a significant role in the explosion of metabolic diseases observed in recent decades, and particularly of diabetes.
Health - May 21

A new study led by the University of Bristol will help uncover risk factors and links between self-harm and eating disorders. New funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC) now allows for complex modelling and analysis of Bristol's Children of the 90s questionnaires and clinic data, to further our understanding of factors leading to self harm and eating disorders in children and teenagers.

Social Sciences - May 21
Social Sciences

Refugees who are more willing to take risks, who tend to reciprocate friendliness, and who are more strongly convinced than others are that they are in control of their lives integrate into society faster.

Health - May 21
Health

Findings published today in the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme's 2018 annual report indicate ongoing concerns about the premature deaths of people with learning disabilities.

Environment - May 21
Environment

A $6M grant from the California Energy Commission will go toward developing a cost-effective, scalable, emission detection approach for the state.


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Health - Life Sciences - 21.05.2019
The insulin under the influence of light
The insulin under the influence of light
By understanding how day-night alternation affects the effect of insulin in tissues, researchers at UNIGE are highlighting the role of circadian rhythms in diabetes. The disruption of our internal clocks seems to play a significant role in the explosion of metabolic diseases observed in recent decades, and particularly of diabetes.

Health - 21.05.2019
To help uncover childhood risks for self-harm or eating disorders
A new study led by the University of Bristol will help uncover risk factors and links between self-harm and eating disorders. New funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC) now allows for complex modelling and analysis of Bristol's Children of the 90s questionnaires and clinic data, to further our understanding of factors leading to self harm and eating disorders in children and teenagers.

Health - 21.05.2019
LeDeR annual report indicates ongoing concerns over deaths
LeDeR annual report indicates ongoing concerns over deaths
Findings published today in the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme's 2018 annual report indicate ongoing concerns about the premature deaths of people with learning disabilities. The University of Bristol analyses the findings from completed reviews of deaths and publishes these in its annual reports.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 21.05.2019
A refugee's personality is a factor that decides how successful integration is
A refugee’s personality is a factor that decides how successful integration is
Refugees who are more willing to take risks, who tend to reciprocate friendliness, and who are more strongly convinced than others are that they are in control of their lives integrate into society faster. This is the result of a study undertaken on the basis of the "IAB-BAMF-SOEP Survey of Refugees in Germany" which researchers from the University of Münster, Saarland University and the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) at the German Institute of Economic Research (DIW) devised.

Environment - Business / Economics - 21.05.2019
Berkeley Lab Project to Pinpoint Methane 'Super Emitters'
Berkeley Lab Project to Pinpoint Methane ’Super Emitters’
A $6M grant from the California Energy Commission will go toward developing a cost-effective, scalable, emission detection approach for the state Methane, a potent greenhouse gas that traps about 30 times more heat than carbon dioxide, is commonly released from rice fields, dairies, landfills, and oil and gas facilities - all of which are plentiful in California.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2019
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever lifelong study in mice
Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), xenon prevented early death, improved long-term cognition, and protected brain tissue in mice in a new study. TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in people under 45 in developed countries. The primary injury, caused by the initial force from a fall or car accident for example, is followed by a secondary injury which develops in the minutes, hours and days afterwards.

Pharmacology - Health - 21.05.2019
Using 3D to test personalised treatments in five days
Using 3D to test personalised treatments in five days
UNIGE researchers have developed a cell co-culture platform that can reproduce a patient's tumour in 3D and test the best treatment combinations for its specific case in just five days. Why doesn't the same treatment work in the same way for every patient? How can a drug's performance be optimised without causing side effects due to an excessive dosage? In an attempt to answer these questions, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have devised a cell co-culture platform that reproduces a patient's tumour structure in 3D.

Computer Science / Telecom - 21.05.2019
Bring on faster internet: device packs more into optical fibre
Bring on faster internet: device packs more into optical fibre
A research team has developed a light beam device that could lead to faster internet, clearer images of space and more detailed medical imaging. University of Queensland researcher and optical engineer Dr Joel Carpenter worked with Nokia Bell Labs to build the device to tackle the challenge of splitting light into the shapes it is made up of, known as modes.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 20.05.2019
Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets
Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic, and subsequent sea level rise (SLR) this will cause, is widely recognised as posing a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems. Strategies and measures to mitigate and plan for the potential impacts are reliant on scientific projections of future SLR - conventionally provided using numerical modelling.

Chemistry - 20.05.2019
More detailed picture of Earth’s mantle
The chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is a lot more variable and diverse than previously thought, a new study has revealed. According to a new analysis of cores drilled through the ocean crust, the mantle is made up of distinct sections of rock each with different chemical make-ups. The chemical composition of the mantle has been notoriously difficult to determine with a high degree of certainty because it is largely inaccessible.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.05.2019
Formation of the moon brought water to earth
Formation of the moon brought water to earth
The Earth is unique in our solar system: It is the only terrestrial planet with a large amount of water and a relatively large moon, which stabilizes the Earth's axis. Both were essential for Earth to develop life. Planetologists at the University of Münster have now been able to show, for the first time, that water came to Earth with the formation of the Moon some 4.4 billion years ago.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally, it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding - and only the right structure will “unlock” the drug's therapeutic effect.

Health - 20.05.2019
Using activity monitors to track cats’ activity levels
Does your cat live indoors' Researchers from the University of Bristol Vet School want to hear from indoor cat owners for a new study looking at cats' mobility levels using cat activity monitors. The researchers want to study the effect of joint disease on cats' activity levels by using activity monitors to measure the movements of cats with and without mobility problems.

Physics - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
Everything stays the same: Standard measurement units redefined
Everything stays the same: Standard measurement units redefined
More than a century of work reached its conclusion May 20, with all base units of measurement now tied to defined constants rather than physical objects locked away in vaults. Next up at Stanford: Quantifying us. Scales aren't changing and the weather won't be noticeably different, but on May 20 the definitions that underlie what your scale and thermometer report - along with standard definitions used in chemistry and electronics - are undergoing a major overhaul.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.05.2019
Scientists use molecular tethers and chemical 'light sabers' to construct platforms for tissue engineering
Scientists use molecular tethers and chemical ’light sabers’ to construct platforms for tissue engineering
Tissue engineering could transform medicine. Instead of waiting for our bodies to regrow or repair damage after an injury or disease, scientists could grow complex, fully functional tissues in a laboratory for transplantation into patients. Proteins are key to this future. In our bodies, protein signals tell cells where to go, when to divide and what to do.

History / Archeology - 20.05.2019
Facial reconstruction breathes new life into ancient citizens of Sagalassos
A look into the past. It's usually just a metaphor, but archaeologists Jeroen Poblome and Sam Cleymans have made it a physical reality. Together with the University of Burdur, Turkey, they have reconstructed the faces of two centuries-old residents of Sagalassos. For over thirty years, KU Leuven researchers have been examining the archaeological site of Sagalassos with an international and interdisciplinary team.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
Researchers from the Alberto Santos Dumont Association for Research Support (AASDAP) in Brazil, in collaboration with EPFL, have developed a non-invasive strategy that combines functional electrostimulation and a brain-machine interface to help people with paraplegia walk again. This rehabilitation approach was tested on two patients, who showed an improvement in their motor skills and a partial neurological recovery.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.05.2019
Bacteria Change Behavior To Tackle Tiny Obstacle Course
It's not exactly the set of TV's " American Ninja Warrior ," but a tiny obstacle course for bacteria has shown researchers how E. coli changes its behavior to rapidly clear obstructions to food. Their work holds implications for not only biology and medicine, but also robotic search-and-rescue tactics.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
Empathic birds
Empathic birds
Raven observers show emotional contagion with raven demonstrators experiencing an unpleasant affect To effectively navigate the social world, we need information about each other's emotions. Emotional contagion has been suggested to facilitate such information transmission, constituting a basic building block of empathy that could also be present in non-human animals.

Pedagogy - 19.05.2019
The negative impact of positive Ofsted ratings
As GCSE exam season starts this week, new research has found a positive Ofsted rating can have a surprising negative impact on students. Parents with kids in schools that received a better than expected Ofsted report are much more likely to reduce help with homework and this can have a damaging impact on GCSE results.
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