News 2019

Business - Nov 20
Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals. Financial incentives and criminal punishment will not root out corrupt business practices, but a government culture of honesty, integrity and strong leadership could help to cure corruption.
Health - Nov 20
Health

The introduction of a digital alert system to monitor patients with sepsis has led to a reduction in deaths and hospital stays.

Environment - Nov 20

Researchers from KU Leuven have discovered that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. The study discovered that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness.

Life Sciences - Nov 20

This year, Ghent University has 23 researchers with Highly Cited status. Two more than last year, and no less than half of all frequently quoted scientists associated with Flemish universities. The list is classified by discipline, but there is also a cross-field category.

Earth Sciences - Nov 20
Earth Sciences

EPFL spin-off Medusoil has successfully tested its ground-stabilization process on cliffs subject to surface erosion.


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Business / Economics - Administration - 20.11.2019
Government integrity holds key to tackling corporate corruption - study
Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals. Financial incentives and criminal punishment will not root out corrupt business practices, but a government culture of honesty, integrity and strong leadership could help to cure corruption.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.11.2019
Digital sepsis monitoring system helps save lives and improves care
Digital sepsis monitoring system helps save lives and improves care
The introduction of a digital alert system to monitor patients with sepsis has led to a reduction in deaths and hospital stays. Sepsis, also known as blood poisoning, is life threatening and accounts for an estimated 46,000 deaths in the UK each year. If diagnosed early it can be treated effectively with antibiotics but the difficulty lies in spotting sepsis before it develops, as symptoms are similar to other illnesses such as flu.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.11.2019
23 Ghent University researchers are "Highly Cited Researcher 2019"
This year, Ghent University has 23 researchers with Highly Cited status. Two more than last year, and no less than half of all frequently quoted scientists associated with Flemish universities. The list is classified by discipline, but there is also a cross-field category.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.11.2019
Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies
Researchers from KU Leuven have discovered that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. The study discovered that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness. "Research into the role of microbes in our ecosystem is of vital importance to safeguard bees." It is not widely known that pollen and floral nectar contain yeasts.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 20.11.2019
Stabilizing a cliff using biomineral binders
Stabilizing a cliff using biomineral binders
EPFL spin-off Medusoil has successfully tested its ground-stabilization process on cliffs subject to surface erosion. The company's biomineral-based solution can be used to stabilize sandy and gravelly subsoils to safeguard surrounding infrastructure. It is a long-lasting and easy-to-use alternative to industrial fluids - the production and use of which can be harmful to the environment.

Pedagogy - 20.11.2019
Lower income to blame for poorer attainment of children brought up by single mothers
New research examining the effect of being raised by a single mother reveals lower income and resources has the greatest impact on a child's development, not poor parenting skills. The study, published today [20 November] in the journal Child Development , found children who lived with a single mother before age 11 had lower verbal ability than children whose parents stayed together.

Art and Design - 20.11.2019
Beauty in the biased eye of the beholder
Beauty in the biased eye of the beholder
When we pass through an art gallery, what determines our idea of beauty? A University of Sydney study of how people rate the aesthetics of each artwork shows part of our aesthetic assessment is due to the painting you saw a few moments before.  The research, led by PhD student Ms Sujin Kim in the School of Psychology , is published in the  Journal of Vision .  It shows that we don't appreciate every painting in isolation.

Life Sciences - Academic Rankings - 19.11.2019
UCL academics named in global list of influential researchers
Forty-four academics are included in Clarivate's 'Highly Cited Researchers 2019' list, which recognises authors of the most influential research papers around the world. The results are comparable with university peers such as Oxford (55 researchers recognised), Cambridge (53) and Imperial College London (34) and represent an increase since last year, when 41 UCL researchers were recognised.

Astronomy / Space Science - 19.11.2019
Evidence of missing neutron star
The leftovers from a spectacular supernova that revolutionised our understanding of how stars end their lives have finally been spotted by astronomers at Cardiff University. The scientists claim to have found evidence of the location of a neutron star that was left behind when a massive star ended its life in a gigantic explosion, leading to a famous supernova dubbed Supernova 1987A.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.11.2019
Depression puts South African girls at higher risk of contracting HIV
South African Actresses Khomotso Manyaka, right, and Keaoboka Makanyane, left, starred in the 2010 Oscar-nominated film "Life, above all," a drama about the impact of the impact of HIV-AIDS in their country. A new UC Berkeley-led analysis suggests that addressing the mental health needs of teen women in South Africa may help stem the spread of the disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2019
A new pathway to
A new pathway to "reprogram" killer cells
Killer cells of the immune system detect and kill infected cells or cancer cells. Researchers at the Institute of Pathology at the University of Bern have now discovered that the mechanism by which certain immune cells kill their target cells can also be used to control the killer cells themselves. This finding may be relevant to cancer immunotherapy.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.11.2019
Why some hospitals don’t prioritize the sickest heart transplant patients
Analysis of more than 29,000 adults listed on the national heart transplant registry from 2006 to 2015 shows how rules that give hospitals discretion in determining who gets a transplant result in large discrepancies in how sick patients are when they receive heart transplants at hospitals across the United States.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.11.2019
Technique to preserve sexual function after prostate cancer surgery
A UCLH and UCL led trial of a technique to preserve men's sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery has begun to recruit participants across the UK. The trial of the NeuroSAFE procedure - designed to avoid the removal during surgery of nerves near the prostate which are important for sexual function - is being led by UCLH consultant urological surgeon Greg Shaw and sponsored by UCL.

Transport - Innovation - 19.11.2019
Super-efficient wing takes off
Super-efficient wing takes off
Aeroelastic wing's first flight at Special Airport Oberpfaffenhofen Super-efficient wing takes off In a joint effort by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), researchers have successfully developed new technologies for lighter aircraft wings that are still extremely stable.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 19.11.2019
Ayahuasca compound changes brainwaves to vivid 'waking-dream' state
Ayahuasca compound changes brainwaves to vivid ’waking-dream’ state
Scientists have peered inside the brain to show how taking DMT affects human consciousness by significantly altering the brain's electrical activity. DMT (or dimethyltryptamine) is one of the main psychoactive constituents in ayahuasca, the psychedelic brew traditionally made from vines and leaves of the Amazon rainforest.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2019
KU Leuven researchers receive 3 million dollars to fight Crohn’s disease
Why do some patients with Crohn's disease still suffer from abdominal pain, even when their treatment is successful? With funding from the Helmsley Charitable Trust, researchers from Belgium and Sweden will spend the next three years examining the underlying mechanisms of this pain. Approximately 3 out of 1000 people have Crohn's disease, which is characterised by intestinal inflammation.

Transport - 19.11.2019
How the road network determines traffic capacity
How the road network determines traffic capacity
ETH researchers have shown that we can use the structure of urban road networks to predict their traffic capacity. This information enables urban and transportation planners to quantify how changes will influence traffic volumes. People who commute by car will have an idea of what "traffic capacity" means, drawn from their own experience: as a stream of cars heads into a city early in the morning, the flow of traffic initially increases - until a critical point is reached in terms of the number of vehicles on the roads.

Pharmacology - 18.11.2019
Scientists and schoolkids find family soups have antimalarial properties
London schoolchildren have found that some of their families' soup recipes have antimalarial properties, with the help of Imperial scientists. Researchers from Imperial College London helped the schoolchildren test their family soup broths for activity against the malaria parasite. We may have to look beyond the chemistry shelf for new drugs, and natural remedies shouldn't be off our watch list, as artemisinin shows.

Environment - Chemistry - 18.11.2019
Climate change could double greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater ecosystems
Climate change could double greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater ecosystems
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Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 18.11.2019
Alliance for additive manufacturing
Alliance for additive manufacturing
TUM, Oerlikon and Linde develop high-strength lightweight aluminum-based alloy New research alliance for additive manufacturing Together with the Swiss technology group Oerlikon and the industrial gas manufacturer Linde, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has entered into a research alliance for additive manufacturing (AM).
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