News 2019

Life Sciences - Oct 16
Multidrug-resistant bacteria are found in half of all dog foods made from raw meat, researchers from the University of Zurich have found. Feeding pets a diet of raw meat, also known as a "BARF" diet, is a growing trend. The resistant bacteria in the raw food can be transmitted to the pets - and thus also to humans.
Environment - Oct 16
Environment

The effects environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks will have on the global supply of metals without major innovations in the mining industry have been highlighted by University of Queensland researchers.

Astronomy - Oct 15

Astronomers at the University of Chicago, MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation.

Business - Oct 15
Business

Text analytics software developed by The University of Queensland will be available as a ‘Software as a Service' product to individual subscribers for the first time.

Health - Oct 15

The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease.


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Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2019
Raw Meat-Based Diets for Pets Pose a Health Risk for Humans
Multidrug-resistant bacteria are found in half of all dog foods made from raw meat, researchers from the University of Zurich have found. Feeding pets a diet of raw meat, also known as a "BARF" diet, is a growing trend. The resistant bacteria in the raw food can be transmitted to the pets - and thus also to humans.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 16.10.2019
Major implications for global metal demand without industry change
Major implications for global metal demand without industry change
The effects environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks will have on the global supply of metals without major innovations in the mining industry have been highlighted by University of Queensland researchers. Researchers from UQ's Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI) designed a matrix to assess the ESG context of more than 600 individual copper, iron and bauxite orebodies and then analysed how it may affect global supply.

Business / Economics - Computer Science / Telecom - 15.10.2019
UQ-developed text analytics app now available for all
UQ-developed text analytics app now available for all
Text analytics software developed by The University of Queensland will be available as a ‘Software as a Service' product to individual subscribers for the first time. TopicGuide is Leximancer 's new automated approach to text analytics that uses an algorithm developed by former UQ Health and Behavioural Sciences researcher and the company's chief scientist Dr Andrew Smith to quickly identify key trends, concepts and ideas from large pieces of text.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.10.2019
Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens
Astronomers at the University of Chicago, MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation. While this technique has been used to magnify objects at optical wavelengths, this is the first time scientists have leveraged it to zoom in on extreme, distant X-ray-emitting phenomena.

Health - Environment - 15.10.2019
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease. The model could help policymakers to decide where to target vaccine deployment, or develop healthcare infrastructure, to reduce the risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks - illnesses that spread between animals and humans.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
Deaf infants more attuned to parent's visual cues
Deaf infants more attuned to parent’s visual cues
Eye gaze helps infants communicate. Through everyday interactions, eye gaze establishes a social connection between parent and child and is linked to early word learning. But can learning experiences before a baby's first birthday prompt babies to pay more attention to their parent's eye gaze? To test this, a research team led by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) sought out Deaf infants raised by Deaf parents - families who primarily use visual language and visual cues.

Business / Economics - Environment - 15.10.2019
US green economy worth $1.3 trillion per year
The US green economy is estimated to generate over $1.3 trillion in revenue per year, representing 16.5% of the global green economy, according to a new study by UCL. The green economy - broadly defined as an economy that is low carbon, resource efficient and socially inclusive - is a major source of jobs in the US, employing an estimated 9.5 million people.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.10.2019
Antibody eradicates leukemia stem cells
The introduction of the drug imatinib in 2001 revolutionized the treatment of a type of cancer called chronic myelogenous leukemia. In more than 80% of people with CML who received the drug, the disease went into complete remission. However, in most people with chronic myelogenous leukemia, cancerous stem cells remain in the body for years after their cancer has gone into remission.

Chemistry - 15.10.2019
Platinum breakthrough for cleaner and cheaper catalysts
Scientists have developed a new way of significantly reducing the amount of platinum used in catalysts, opening up a much cheaper and cleaner ways of producing a whole host of commodity chemicals and fuels. Though present in a whole host of catalysts used to speed up chemical reactions in industrial processes, platinum is an extremely expensive metal that produces harmful by-products.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
Lowest-paid workers have longest retirements
The lowest-paid workers in the UK have three more years of retirement on average compared to their professional counterparts, but are more likely to suffer ill health after stopping work, a new UCL-led study suggests. The study, published today in The Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , examined the length of time between stopping work and dying among people in England and Wales born before 1951.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
New links between food access and risk of malnutrition for older people
New research has highlighted that food insecurity - a measure of the availability of food and individuals' ability to access it - is putting older people in Scotland at risk of becoming underweight and malnourished. The ongoing study from the University of Glasgow and the Scottish charity Food Train is focused on the current issues facing older adults and food access.

Materials Science - Physics - 15.10.2019
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behaviour and identify the important new ones. Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , challenge the accepted wisdom on wetting and drying phase behaviour.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions. The research by academics from the Universities of Edinburgh and Bristol and funded by the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council, is published today [Tuesday 15 October] .

Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
Piranha fish swap old teeth for new simultaneously
A CT-scanned image of the piranha Serrasalmus medinai. Note the ingested fish fins in its stomach. University of Washington Piranha fish have a powerful bite. Their teeth help them shred through the flesh of their prey or even scrape plants off rocks to supplement their diet. Years ago, scientists discovered that piranhas lose all of the teeth on one side of their mouth at once and regrow them, presumably to replace dulled teeth with brand new sharp spears for gnawing on prey.

Computer Science / Telecom - 15.10.2019
Female-led Team Uses AI to Help Machines Play Nice with Humans
An interdisciplinary group of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University has received a $2.8 million DARPA grant to enhance machine-human team collaborations Three Carnegie Mellon University researchers - the lead investigator, Anita Williams Woolley at the Tepper School of Business , along with co-investigators Cleotilde Gonzalez at the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences and Henny Admoni at The Robotics Institute - are l

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
High numbers of young people experimenting with gambling
Two fifths (41%) of young people aged 11 to 16 report having engaged in gambling in the past year, a study shows. The analysis from Cardiff University academics, the largest of its kind in the UK, reveals fruit machines at an arcade, pub or club were the most popular form of gambling, followed by playing cards for money with friends and purchasing scratch cards.

Social Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 15.10.2019
Increase in online hate speech leads to more crimes against minorities
An increase in hate speech on social media leads to more crimes against minorities in the physical world, a study shows. Academics from Cardiff University's HateLab project collected Twitter and police recorded crime data from London over an eight-month period to analyse whether a significant association existed.

Health - Music - 15.10.2019
First smart speaker system that uses white noise to monitor infants' breathing
First smart speaker system that uses white noise to monitor infants’ breathing
Gone are the days when people use smart speakers - like Amazon Echo or Google Home - only as kitchen timers or dinner party music players. These devices have started helping people track their own health, and can even monitor for cardiac arrest. Now researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new smart speaker skill that lets a device use white noise to both soothe sleeping babies and monitor their breathing and movement.

Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
The Brain Does not Follow the Head
The Brain Does not Follow the Head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. This has to do, among other things, with the evolution of novel brain structures that enabled complex behaviors such as language and tool production. A study by anthropologists at the University of Zurich now shows that changes in the brain occurred independent of evolutionary rearrangements of the braincase.

Physics - 15.10.2019
Quantum physics: ménage à trois photon-style
Quantum physics: ménage à trois photon-style
Physicists from UNIGE have discovered a new quantum property: by placing three pairs of photons in a network, it is possible to entangle them and create new ultra-strong correlations. Entanglement is one of the properties specific to quantum particles. When two photons become entangled, for instance, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second, even if they are at a distance from one another.
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