News 2019


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Results 21 - 40 of 128.


Innovation / Technology - Life Sciences - 15.01.2019
Ultra ultrasound to revolutionise technology
A new and extremely sensitive method of measuring ultrasound could revolutionise everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles. Researchers at The University of Queensland have combined modern nanofabrication* and nanophotonics* techniques to build the ultraprecise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip.

Health - 14.01.2019
Ers develop comprehensive new way to predict breast cancer risk
Ers develop comprehensive new way to predict breast cancer risk
Scientists have created the most comprehensive method yet to predict a woman's risk of breast cancer, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The study, funded by Cancer Research, is published today in Genetics in Medicine.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.01.2019
Measurement of five flashes from the depths of the universe
Measurement of five flashes from the depths of the universe
First-time precise measurement of gamma-ray bursts conducted successfully from a space station A detector called POLAR, developed at PSI, has been sent to outer space to collect data. In September 2016, the device was launched into Earth orbit on board the newest Chinese space station. From that vantage point, POLAR recorded so-called gamma-ray bursts flashing in the far reaches of the universe.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.01.2019
Large Study Identifies Genetic Variants Linked to Risk Tolerance and Risky Behaviors
An international group that includes researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has identified 124 genetic variants associated with a person's willingness to take risks, as reported in a study published January 14 . The researchers emphasize that no variant on its own meaningfully affects a particular person's risk tolerance or penchant for making risky decisions — such as drinking, smoking, speeding — and non-genetic factors matter more for risk tolerance than genetic factors.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
Potential for risky behavior is also in your genes
As part of an international research project, a group of scientists from the University of Zurich found genetic variants associated with risk tolerance and risky behaviors. It is one of the first studies to link genetic variants with behavioral outcomes, which are relevant to social science research.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.01.2019
Conversion of breast cancer cells into fat cells impedes the formation of metastases
Conversion of breast cancer cells into fat cells impedes the formation of metastases
An innovative combination therapy can force malignant breast cancer cells to turn into fat cells. This can be used to prevent the formation of metastases in mice, as researchers at the University of Basel's Department of Biomedicine recently reported in the journal Cancer Cell. Tumor cells can adapt dynamically to changing conditions thanks to their ability to reactivate a cellular process that is central to embryonic development.

Environment - 14.01.2019
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research, carried out by scientists at the Universities of Bristol, Edinburgh, Leeds and Reading in collaboration with Cardiff University and the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), has revealed that gardens and allotments are good for pollinators, and lavender and borage are important garden plants that pollinators use as food sources.

Health - 14.01.2019
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Recalling positive events and experiences can help protect young people against depression in later life, suggests new research published today. Our work suggests that 'remembering the good times' may help build resilience to stress and reduce vulnerability to depression in young people Adrian Dahl Askelund Depression is now the leading cause of disability worldwide, affecting more than 300 million people.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
University launches first-of-its-kind equipment to transform imaging of cells, tissues and materials
The University of Nottingham is the first university in the world to own and operate unique equipment which allows label-free chemical imaging of materials, cells and tissues, with the potential to transform research in these areas. The new 3DOrbiSIMS is the first production instrument of its kind and will have applications in a multi-disciplinary range of research areas, including biomedical implants, drug delivery systems, developing strategies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, organic electronic devices and engineering applications.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.01.2019
Ricocheting Black Hole Jet Discovered by Chandra
Astronomers have discovered behavior by a jet from a giant black hole that has never been seen before. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory they have observed a jet that bounced off a wall of gas and then punched a hole in a cloud of energetic particles. This behavior can tell scientists more about how jets from black holes interact with their surroundings.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
How gut bacteria from infants could prevent food allergy
New research shows that healthy infants have intestinal bacteria that prevent the development of food allergies, findings that could impact the treatment of a disease that now affects 15 million Americans. Researchers from the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Naples Federico II in Italy discovered that when gut microbes from healthy human infants were transplanted into germ-free mice, the animals were protected from an allergic reaction when exposed to cow's milk.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
New report reveals stark north south divide in painkiller prescribing
A new report has revealed that patients in the north of the country are being prescribed almost four times more opioids to relieve pain than those in the south. The research by the University of Nottingham's School of Pharmacy and the University of Manchester is the first national study to examine the regional variations in opioid prescribing and how this links with socioeconomic status.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
A metabolic checkpoint for embryonic stem cell differentiation
Upon exit from self-renewal, embryonic cell stems differentiate into different types of tissues - a process regulated by various complex mechanisms. Recent work published by the Betschinger group shows the importance of the lysosome - which is directly associated with cellular metabolism and nutrition - in developmental progression.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.01.2019
Double Star System Flips Planet-Forming Disk into Pole Position
Harvard & Smithsonian has found the first confirmed example of a double star system that has flipped its surrounding disc to a position that leaps over the orbital plane of those stars. The international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) to obtain high-resolution images of the Asteroid belt-sized disc.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.01.2019
Herbal antioxidants are becoming increasingly important
Herbal antioxidants are becoming increasingly important
Secondary plant compounds as an alternative to antioxidant vitamins and minerals The human organism is constantly exposed to so-called free radicals, which are a burden on the body. If they get out of hand, the result is oxidative stress, which can promote disease. While this has been treated in the past with the help of antioxidant vitamins and minerals, scientists are now increasingly turning to the use of phytochemicals, representing plant secondary metabolites.

Health - 14.01.2019
Reducing out of pocket health costs associated with better population health: study
Reducing out of pocket health costs associated with better population health: study
Reducing user charges is associated with improved health outcomes in low and middle-income countries, new research has found. The first systematic review of the relationship between user charges and health outcomes in lower middle-income countries, published in BMJ Global Health, found that reducing user charges for vulnerable populations can reduce financial hardship from healthcare payments, which in turn improves health outcomes and promotes health equity.

Environment - 11.01.2019
'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking
’Realistic’ new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking
Accurately predicting fracture mechanics can help industry optimize pumping, fracturing-fluid viscosity, other parameters Branching into densely spaced hydraulic cracks is essential for effective gas or oil extraction from shale. It is suspected to occur, but the existing mathematical models and commercial software fail to predict it.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Predicting and preventing preterm births
Each year, 15 million babies worldwide are born prematurely, arriving at least three weeks before their due dates. Globally, prematurity is the largest cause of death before age 5, and even with excellent medical care, children who survive can have lasting physical, developmental and cognitive challenges.

Business / Economics - 11.01.2019
Why people make up their minds sooner than they realize
You may think you are being prudent in taking the time to gather as much information as possible before making up your mind, but a new study finds that people consume far less information than expected before making judgments and decisions. Whether buying a new car, hiring a job candidate or getting married, people assume they can and will use more information to make their decisions than they actually end up using, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
Microbes screened with a new microfluidic process might be used in power generation or environmental cleanup. Living in extreme conditions requires creative adaptations. For certain species of bacteria that exist in oxygen-deprived environments, this means finding a way to breathe that doesn't involve oxygen.