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Results 21 - 40 of 1805.


Astronomy / Space Science - 18.07.2019
"It was the greatest adventure of the 1960s"
Professor Schreiber, how big an impression did the Moon landing make on you when you were young? It wasn't just the Moon landing as such. What amazed me most were the steps that led up to it. It was a huge technical challenge. For example the question: How do I accelerate a rocket to reach the Moon? Back then, the technical possibilities were still quite limited.

Life Sciences - 18.07.2019
Mosquito brain integrates diverse sensory cues to locate a host to bite
Mosquito brain integrates diverse sensory cues to locate a host to bite
For female mosquitoes, finding their next meal is all about smelling and seeing. Through behavioral experiments and real-time recording of the female mosquito brain, a team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of Washington, has discovered how the mosquito brain integrates signals from two of its sensory systems - visual and olfactory - to identify, track and hone in on a potential host for her next blood meal.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.07.2019
Research Identifies New Pathways for Sensory Learning in the Brain
Automated, robotic training device developed by Carnegie Mellon undergraduate student advances neuroscience research We've all heard the saying that individuals learn at their own pace. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an automated, robotic training device that allows mice to learn at their leisure.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.07.2019
Top Ten Organisations for Animal Research Announced
Understanding Animal Research, an organisation promoting greater openness about animal research, has today released a list of the ten organisations in Great Britain that carry out the highest number of animal procedures - those used in medical, veterinary and scientific research. These statistics are freely available on the organisations' websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness around the use of animals in research.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.07.2019
Omega-6 fatty acid could help prevent heart disease
An omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid has the potential to help fight heart disease, finds a new study by researchers at Cardiff University in collaboration with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. With funding from the British Heart Foundation, the team found that dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, could halt the progression of atherosclerosis - one of the leading causes of heart disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Leukemia: how cancer stem cells suppress a danger detector
Leukemia: how cancer stem cells suppress a danger detector
Acute myeloid leukemia stem cells elude the body's immune cells by deactivating a danger detector. The underlying mechanisms and the potential new therapeutic approaches that this gives rise to have been detailed by researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel in collaboration with colleagues in Germany.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.07.2019
50 years later, UChicago scientists continue to decode moon’s mysteries
Fifty years ago, NASA astronauts stepped off Apollo 11 and delivered what instantly became the most precious rock on Earth: nearly 50 pounds of dust and rock fragments from the surface of the moon. Suddenly, the wildest dreams of geoscientists had come true, as tiny pieces of the first rocks collected on another celestial body made their way to labs across the U.S. for analysis.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.07.2019
First-ever visualisations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
First-ever visualisations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
Scientists have visualized the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely tuned, high-performance electronic devices. Physicists from the University of Washington and the University of Warwick developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in operating microelectronic devices made of atomically thin - so-called 2D - materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.07.2019
A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune
A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune
W hat's thinner than a human hair but has a depth of special traits' A multitasking graphene device developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The superthin material easily switches from a superconductor that conducts electricity without losing any energy, to an insulator that resists the flow of electric current, and back again to a superconductor - all with a simple flip of a switch.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.07.2019
Hunting for
Hunting for "ghost particles": Neutrino observatory at the South Pole will be extended
For almost ten years, scientists from all over the world have been using the large-scale experiment "IceCube" to search for neutrinos in the permanent ice of the South Pole. Neutrinos are the smallest particles that reach Earth as cosmic rays. Now the participating researchers, among them Prof. Alexander Kappes from the University of Münster, are pleased about a huge upgrade of the laboratory, which should contribute to measuring the properties of neutrinos much more accurately than before.

Health - Career - 17.07.2019
Four new professorships to drive forward diabetes research in Bern
Four new professorships to drive forward diabetes research in Bern
The University of Bern and the Diabetes Center Berne (DCB) are together creating four professorships in the field of diabetes technology research and development. This will boost the international profile of diabetes research in Bern and strengthen its role as a center of medicine in the long term. The four professorships are to be financed with 417,000 Swiss francs per annum each over a period of 12 years.

Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Scientists model the flight of dandelion seeds
EPFL scientists, working in association with colleagues at the University of Twente and the University of Pisa, have studied the link between the number of bristles on dandelion seeds and the ability of those seeds to travel long distances in a stable manner.  Humans went to great lengths to design airplanes that can fly stably at cruising speed.

Health - Psychology - 17.07.2019
Body and mind need care in mental illness
The 18-year life expectancy gap between people with mental illness and the general population can only be bridged by protecting patients' physical and mental health, according to a new study. As part of a Lancet Psychiatry Commission into mental illness, University of Queensland researchers found patients' physical health was often overlooked in pursuit of treating the mind.

Music - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound
Researchers at UNIGE and at Maastricht University have demonstrated that the brain adapts to a person's listening intentions by focusing either on a speaker's voice or on the speech sounds that are being uttered.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Higher iron levels may boost heart health - but also increase risk of stroke
Scientists have helped unravel the protective ' and potentially harmful ' effect of iron in the body. In a series of early-stage studies examining genetic data from over 500,000 people, a team of international scientists, led by Imperial College London, explored the role that iron plays in over 900 diseases.

Health - 16.07.2019
Are fertility apps useful?
Are fertility apps useful?
Researchers at EPFL and Stanford have carried out an analysis of the largest datasets from fertility awareness apps. Analyzing data from 200,000 users of the apps Sympto and Kindara, they have been able to make population-level observations regarding user demographics, tracking behavior patterns and accuracy in measuring menstrual health and ovulation.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.07.2019
Parkinson’s disease study identifies possible new treatment target
Treatments for Parkinson's disease have most recently focused on increasing dopamine, a chemical messenger in the brain that affects reward-based behaviors and motivation, as well as movement. A new study by Yale researchers challenges long-held assumptions about dopamine's sole role in this disorder.

Environment - Business / Economics - 16.07.2019
Sharing data key in fight against illegal fishing
Sharing data may be a vital element in ending illegal fishing - a crime currently robbing nations of approximately $23 billion annually while also undermining legal fisheries management and industry practices. A perpetrator of human trafficking, smuggling, human rights violations and environmental degradation, illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing poses a serious threat to the economies, environment and security of nations.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.07.2019
Some Assembly Required: Scientists Piece Together the Largest U.S.-Based Dark Matter Experiment
Some Assembly Required: Scientists Piece Together the Largest U.S.-Based Dark Matter Experiment
M ost of the remaining components needed to fully assemble an underground dark matter-search experiment called LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) arrived at the project's South Dakota home during a rush of deliveries in June. When complete, LZ will be the largest, most sensitive U.S.-based experiment yet that is designed to directly detect dark matter particles.

Life Sciences - 16.07.2019
The physiology of survival
The physiology of survival
The survival and growth of cells are central factors in biological systems. Scientists such as Ulrich Gerland, Professor for Physics of Complex Biosystems at the TUM, are therefore trying to understand how the molecular components interact to maintain the viability of a group of cells in stress situations.