News 2019


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Results 301 - 320 of 3505.


Economics / Business - 27.11.2019
The dirty tricks of online shopping, designed to make you spend more
As millions of people begin their holiday shopping, they'll come across many familiar tricks online. In some cases, sites will hype limited-time deals with a countdown clock, warn you that the product you're looking at is running out of stock, or tell you that 65 people in your area have recently purchased the item.

Social Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
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Health - 27.11.2019
Physiotherapy ’postcode lottery’ uncovered
New findings showed that patients are more likely to receive physiotherapy after hip or knee replacement in London and the North of England. Patients in the South West are the least likely to receive physiotherapy. The research also found a range of other factors impacted whether patients received physiotherapy - including the age of the patient, their gender and ethnicity.

Environment - 27.11.2019
Neonicotinoids: despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Neonicotinoids: despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Since 2013, a European Union (EU) moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides-and especially of imidacloprid-can still be detected in rape nectar from 48% of the plots of studied fields, their concentrations varying greatly over the years.

Linguistics / Literature - 27.11.2019
Moličre most likely did write his own plays
Two French researchers from the CNRS and Ecole nationale des chartes disprove the theory according to which Corneille was Moličre's ghostwriter - a popular and century-old theory, defended by some academics and writers. According to their forthcoming study in Science Advances, Moličre would most likely be the only author of his numerous masterpieces.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.11.2019
Puffins stay cool thanks to their large beak
Channels McGill University News and Events Tufted puffins regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search for food. In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology , researchers from McGill University and the University of California, Davis, used thermal imaging cameras to measure heat dissipation off the bodies and beaks of wild tufted puffins in the minutes after flying.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
IRB investigates the disposal mechanisms of damaged proteins
Causal Effects of Brevity on Style and Success in Social Media Faculty of Informatics Open lecture of the course Argumentation in Conflict Resolution Visiting Alumni: Loredana Padurean, Associate Dean, Asia School of Business «Quel ramo del lago di Como...». Lettura dei «Promessi Sposi» Faculty of Communication Sciences Visiting Alumni: Elia Frapolli, Freelance Consultant Course schedules Academic calendar Humans cells select, through the endoplasmic reticulum, the damaged proteins that must be destroyed quickly to avoid their accumulation, which is toxic to our organism.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare. Researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol worked with Guangzhou Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, enlisting 1,641 six-year-old children across 40 primary schools in Guangzhou to evaluate the effectiveness of the CHIRPY DRAGON programme in tackling childhood obesity.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2019
Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients due to increase in overdose death
Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients who are being treated with methadone or buprenorphine, also known as opioid agonist treatment (OAT), due to a three-fold increase in risk of overdose death, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Educating parents and grandparents - as well as improving physical activity and the food provided at school - could hold the key to solving China's obesity pandemic, according to one of the largest trials of childhood obesity prevention in the world. Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.11.2019
A protein tag to study the immune system
Researchers from VIB-Ghent Universitiy Center for Medical Biotechnology and other collaborators, developed a novel approach to better understand a basic defense mechanism of our immune system. Central is ISG15, a small protein with a role in the immune system. With the newly developed method, scientists can now identify and study proteins tagged with ISG15, allowing them to unravel its many functions in fighting disease, potentially leading to novel antimicrobial drugs.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2019
One shot of ketamine could reduce problem drinking
A one-off dose of ketamine could help heavy drinkers reduce their alcohol intake, finds a new UCL experimental study. Giving a shot of ketamine to heavy drinkers after reactivating their drinking-related memories led to a rapid decrease in urges to drink and a prolonged decrease in alcohol intake over nine months, according to the study published .

Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Children of abused mothers 50 per cent more likely to have low IQ
In the study academics from the universities of Manchester, Bristol, Manchester Metropolitan and Kings College London found 13 per cent of children whose mothers did not experience domestic violence had an IQ of below 90 at eight years of age. If their mothers experienced physical violence from their partner either in pregnancy or during the first six years of the child's life, the figure rises to 22.8 per cent.

Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Dating and relationship violence a significant issue among young people in Wales
Dating and relationship violence (DRV), including both physical and emotional violence, is a significant issue among young people in Wales, academics say. Cardiff University researchers analysed survey data from nearly 75,000 students aged 11-16, from 193 schools in Wales. Of young people with dating experience, 17% of boys and 12% of girls said that they had experienced physical violence by a romantic partner at least once.

Computer Science - 26.11.2019
Parallel Data Lab Receives Computing Cluster from Los Alamos National Lab
Carnegie Mellon University has received a supercomputer from Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) that will be reconstructed into a computing cluster operated by the Parallel Data Lab (PDL) and housed in the Data Center Observatory. This new cluster will augment the existing Narwhal , also from LANL and made up of parts of the decommissioned Roadrunner supercomputer technology, the fastest supercomputer in the world from June 2008 to June 2009.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 26.11.2019
New Migraine Medications Could Endanger Patients with High Blood Pressure
New migraine medications block αCGRP, a neuropeptide which causes vasodilation, for example in the meninges. The very same peptide, which is formed in the muscles during physical activity, protects the heart ' which is vital for people with chronic high blood pressure. The innovative migraine prophylaxis could endanger these people, as researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated in mice.

Career - Research Management - 26.11.2019
Early co-authorship with a senior academic boosts junior researchers’ future careers
Co-authoring a research paper with an established scientist early in an academic's career leads to significant future benefits for the junior researcher, finds a paper by UCL. This effect is much stronger for early-career researchers affiliated with less prestigious institutions, who are statistically less likely later in their careers to reach the same levels those at the most prestigious institutions will.

Computer Science - 26.11.2019
Is search media biased?
In an audit of search media results for every candidate running for federal office in the 2018 U.S. election, Stanford scholars found no evidence of political bias for or against either party. In recent months, questions have arisen about big tech's unparalleled influence over what news and information people see online.

Computer Science - Event - 26.11.2019
Snapshot of artificial intelligence reveals challenges
A periodic review of the artificial intelligence industry revealed the potential pitfalls of outsourcing our problems for technology to solve rather than addressing the causes, and of allowing outdated predictive modeling to go unchecked. As part of Stanford's ongoing 100-year study on artificial intelligence, known as the AI100, two workshops recently considered the issues of care technologies and predictive modeling to inform the future development of AI technologies.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.11.2019
One third of UK doctors may suffer from workplace ’burnout’
One in three UK doctors working in obstetrics and gynaecology may suffer from workplace burnout. This could affect their well-being and how they treat patients. This is the finding of new research, published in the journal BMJ Open , led by scientists at Imperial College London.