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Results 321 - 340 of 3531.


Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 25.11.2019
Changes in oxygen concentrations in our ocean can disrupt fundamental biological cycles
The nitrogen cycle is essential to all forms of life on Earth - nitrogen is a basic building block of DNA. The marine nitrogen cycle is strongly controlled by biology and small changes in the marine nitrogen cycle have major implications on life. It is thought that the marine nitrogen cycle has stayed relatively stable over geological time due to a range of different feedback mechanisms.

Law - Social Sciences - 25.11.2019
New researchers Law and Development
The Law and Development Research Group welcomes Tomaso Ferrando (research professor), Antidius Kaitu, Tefera Addis (PhD researchers) and Anne Oloo (Sustjustice coordinator). The Law and Development Research Group welcomes Tomaso Ferrando (research professor), Antidius Kaitu, and Tefera Addis (PhD researchers).

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.11.2019
Human migration out of Africa may have followed monsoons in the Middle East
Last year, scientists announced that a human jawbone and prehistoric tools found in 2002 in Misliya Cave, on the western edge of Israel, were between 177,000 and 194,000 years old. The finding suggested that modern humans, who originated in Africa, began migrating out of the continent at least 40,000 years earlier than scientists previously thought.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.11.2019
Air pollution linked to higher glaucoma risk
Living in a more polluted area is associated with a greater likelihood of having glaucoma, a debilitating eye condition that can cause blindness, finds a new UCL-led study in the UK. People in neighbourhoods with higher amounts of fine particulate matter pollution were at least 6% more likely to report having glaucoma than those in the least-polluted areas, according to the findings published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science .

Health - 25.11.2019
Regeneration of nerve cells, 3D printing in construction
Regeneration of nerve cells, 3D printing in construction
DFG funds two new TUM transregional Collaborative Research Centers Regeneration of nerve cells, 3D printing in construction The German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft or DFG) is funding two new transregional Collaborative Research Centers (SFB/Transregional research alliance) involving the Technical University of Munich (TUM).

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.11.2019
First-ever recording of a blue whale’s heart rate
Researchers from the Goldbogen Lab place a suction-cup tag on a blue whale in Monterey Bay. (Image credit: Goldbogen Lab/Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab; NMFS Permit 16111) With a lot of ingenuity and a little luck, researchers monitored the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild. The measurement suggests that blue whale hearts are operating at extremes - and may limit the whale's size.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.11.2019
Babies in the womb may see more than we thought
An intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell (ipRGC) as it would appear if you looked at a mouse's retina through the pupil. The white arrows point to the many different types of cells it networks with: other subtypes of ipRGC cell (red, blue and green) and retinal cells that are not ipRGCs (red).

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.11.2019
Space research at KU Leuven: missions that inspire big dreams
Space research at KU Leuven: missions that inspire big dreams
Let's first state the obvious: the universe is endlessly fascinating. When the first ever picture of a black hole was released this spring, it easily made front pages.

Environment - Health - 25.11.2019
Planning a trip abroad? Before you pack, check the air pollution levels
There are many things people research when planning a vacation or business trip abroad — such as the weather, how to get around a city and where to access free Wi-Fi. But one important piece of information that some people don't look at is a city's air pollution levels. A new study by researchers at UCLA shows that even a short-term visit to a severely polluted city can be detrimental to one's health.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.11.2019
Imperial among UK institutions building parts for new £30m neutrino detector
Researchers at Imperial are starting work on a huge new neutrino experiment, aiming to understand the origin and structure of the universe. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), to be assembled in the US, will have components designed and built by institutions across the UK, including Imperial.

Economics / Business - 25.11.2019
Harder To Breathe: Air Quality has Worsened Since 2016
A CMU study finds recent increase in fine particulate matter are associated with more premature deaths in U.S In the United States, annual average levels of fine particulate matter - PM2.5, a measure of solid particles and liquid droplets that are 2.5 micrometers or smaller found in the air - declined 24% from 2009 to 2016, then increased 5% between 2016 to 2018.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.11.2019
How our dreams prepare us to face our fears
How our dreams prepare us to face our fears
Researchers from UNIGE and HUG demonstrate how the fears we experience in our dreams prepare us to tackle anxiety-provoking situations once we're awake. Do bad dreams serve a real purpose? To answer this question, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), Switzerland, - working in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin (USA) - analysed the dreams of a number of people and identified which areas of the brain were activated when they experienced fear in their dreams.

Pharmacology - 25.11.2019
Missing self triggers NK cell-mediated chronic vascular rejection of solid organ transplants
Publication by CIRI on November 25, 2019. Dogma in transplantation holds that microvascular inflammation (MVI) triggered by recipient's antibody response against alloantigens (antibody-mediated rejection) is the main cause of graft failure. Analysis of a cohort of 129 renal recipients with MVI on graft biopsy shows that, in half of the cases, histological lesions are not mediated by antibodies.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.11.2019
New Approach to Treating Incurable Leukemia in Children Discovered
New Approach to Treating Incurable Leukemia in Children Discovered
Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer affecting children in Switzerland and, unfortunately, is often incurable. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Children's Hospital Zurich have now found a way to stop the driving force behind this type of leukemia at a molecular level and develop a targeted therapy.

Earth Sciences - 25.11.2019
What are lost continents and why are we discovering so many?
What are lost continents and why are we discovering so many?
Led by ARC Future Fellow Dr Maria Seton from the School of Geosciences, a multi-institutional team is finding surprising new information about the nature of continents, from Zealandia and beyond. For most people, continents are Earth's seven main large landmasses. But geoscientists have a different take on this.

Transport - Computer Science - 25.11.2019
Tracking the eye of the pilot
Tracking the eye of the pilot
In a collaboration with Swiss International Air Lines, NASA and other partners, researchers at ETH Zurich have developed eye-tracking software for use in pilot training. This allows instructors to analyse the gaze behaviour of student pilots in the cockpit. Anyone who has ever sat in a cockpit will know how mentally challenging it is to pilot an aircraft.

Life Sciences - 25.11.2019
Drag can lift birds to new heights
Drag can lift birds to new heights
Recordings of birds taking off and landing have revealed that conventional ideas about the role of lift and drag during flight might need revisiting. The work could influence the design of aerial robotics. Future aerial design may owe a nod of thanks to five parrotlets flapping around in an instrumented flight chamber at Stanford University.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.11.2019
New issues for plants and carbon dioxide
Multiple Earth Systems computer models assessed potential drought levels Even though plants can, in many cases, benefit from increased levels of carbon dioxide that are predicted for the future atmosphere, the impact of severe drought on destroying these plants will be extreme, especially in the Amazon, South Africa, Mediterranean, Australia, and southwest USA.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.11.2019
Artificial turf crumb rubber leaches environmental toxins
Channels McGill University News and Events New research spearheaded by scientists at McGill University reports that exposing chicken embryos, a model of higher vertebrate development, to leachate from crumb rubber used for example in artificial turf infill allowed to assess the toxicity of environmental pollutants contained in such material.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.11.2019
Cellular origins of pediatric brain tumors identified
Channels McGill University News and Events Researchers make a breakthrough by identifying that several aggressive pediatric brain tumors are the result of stalled development in embryonic cells A research team led by Dr. Claudia Kleinman, an investigator at the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, together with Dr. Nada Jabado, of the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), and Dr.