News 2019


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Results 3261 - 3280 of 3508.


Life Sciences - Mathematics - 29.01.2019
True colours: a test to determine how animals see colour
True colours: a test to determine how animals see colour
Trained fish at The University of Queensland are helping researchers understand animal vision and factors behind the huge variation in colours between and among species. Ms Naomi Green and Dr Karen Cheney from the Queensland Brain Institute and the School of Biological Sciences have devised what they believe to be the most thorough test of vertebrate colour perception ever developed.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.01.2019
Hepatitis C programmes could save 1.5 million deaths by 2030
Hepatitis C programmes could save 1.5 million deaths by 2030
Imperial scientists have published the first global estimates to determine the impact of improved prevention, diagnosis and treatment for hepatitis C. A comprehensive package of prevention, screening, and treatment interventions could avert 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis and liver cancer deaths globally by 2030 - equal to an 81% reduction in incidence and a 61% reduction in deaths compared with 2015, according to the first study to model hepatitis C interventions globally published in The Lancet.

Health - 28.01.2019
Brexit could lead to thousands more heart attacks and strokes
Brexit could contribute to thousands more deaths from heart attacks and strokes by 2030, new research has found. In one of the first studies to date to look at the impact of Brexit on food imports and public health, researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Liverpool looked at how varying Brexit scenarios would lead to increasing costs for imported fruit and vegetables, resulting in people potentially eating less and increasing their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.01.2019
Active galaxies point to new physics of cosmic expansion
Active galaxies point to new physics of cosmic expansion
Investigating the history of our cosmos with a large sample of distant 'active' galaxies observed by ESA's XMM-Newton, a team of astronomers found there might be more to the early expansion of the Universe than predicted by the standard model of cosmology. According to the leading scenario, our Universe contains only a few percent of ordinary matter.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2019
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
EPFL scientists have discovered how a mutated gene can affect the three-dimensional interactions of genes in the cell, leading to various forms of cancer. Inside the cell, DNA is tightly wrapped around proteins and packed in a complex, 3D structure that we call "chromatin". Chromatin not only protects our genetic material from damage, but also organizes the entire genome by regulating the expression of genes in three dimensions, unwinding them to be presented to the cell's gene-expression machinery and then winding them back in.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
A solid scaffolding for our cells
A solid scaffolding for our cells
UNIGE researchers have discovered the fundamental role of the Not1 protein, which allows proteins to find each other and assemble at a precise pace, in the right place and at the right time. To perform properly the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines".

Computer Science / Telecom - 28.01.2019
Tackling the fake news problem
Tackling the fake news problem
Meet the researchers who are trying to understand and solve fake news problems in the digital age. Fake news is a human activity, so humans should be involved Dr Julio Amador The term ‘fake news' regularly hits the headlines these days. Whether it is to do with political events or information on the various social platforms, it seems like it is getting harder and harder to know who to trust to be a reliable source of information.

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.01.2019
Black holes shed light on expanding Universe
Black holes shed light on expanding Universe
Scientists are using supermassive black holes to measure the expansion of the early Universe. The researchers, including our astronomers here at Durham University, think that their measurements show the Universe might be growing more rapidly than previously thought. Supermassive black holes give off radiation as they feed and are some of the brightest points of light in space.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
"Stop, do not eat fat anymore!"
During fat ingestion , if everything works in our body, an enzyme from the intestine transmits to the brain (through the production of molecules) the message "stop, I am not hungry anymore". This gut-brain axis maintains a balanced food intake. Researchers from the UCLouvain were able to target this enzyme.

Social Sciences - 28.01.2019
Want to squelch fake news' Let the readers take charge
Want to squelch fake news’ Let the readers take charge
Study shows audience judgments can identify online misinformation. Would you like to rid the internet of false political news stories and misinformation? Then consider using - yes - crowdsourcing. That's right. A new study co-authored by an MIT shows that crowdsourced judgments about the quality of news sources may effectively marginalize false news stories and other kinds of online misinformation.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
Whopping big viruses prey on human gut bacteria
Viruses plague bacteria just as viruses like influenza plague humans. Some of the largest of these so-called bacteriophages have now been found in the human gut, where they periodically devastate bacteria just as seasonal outbreaks of flu lay humans low, according to a new study led by UC Berkeley scientists.

Environment - 28.01.2019
Space technology predicts droughts several months in advance
Scientists from ANU have used new space technology to predict droughts and increased bushfire risk up to five months in advance. ANU researcher Siyuan Tian said the team knew they needed to move into space to get closer to understanding the complex nature of drought. They used data from multiple satellites to measure water below the Earth's surface with unprecedented precision, and were able to relate this to drought impacts on the vegetation several months later.

Social Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
Even a one-hour 'planting party' can lift spirits, build skills among women in prison
Even a one-hour ’planting party’ can lift spirits, build skills among women in prison
Both the study's idea and its outcomes were straightforward: Organize a short houseplant-potting workshop for incarcerated women and see if it improved their moods. The answer was yes - a finding reported in December 2018 in the International Journal of Prisoner Health. But what is more nuanced, the study's lead author says, are the lessons we can extrapolate from what otherwise may seem like a simple, one-off event.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.01.2019
Phone or video call therapy improves health anxiety and saves money
A new study by mental health experts has found that easy-access, remotely-delivered psychological treatment can significantly reduce extreme health anxiety in people who repeatedly go to the doctor, or hospital emergency departments.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
Sleep loss heightens pain sensitivity, dulls brain's painkilling response
Sleep loss heightens pain sensitivity, dulls brain’s painkilling response
When we're in pain, we have a hard time sleeping. But how does poor sleep affect pain? For the first time, UC Berkeley scientists have answered that question by identifying neural glitches in the sleep-deprived brain that can intensify and prolong the agony of sickness and injury. Their findings, published Jan.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 28.01.2019
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Device made from flexible, inexpensive materials could power large-area electronics, wearables, medical devices, and more. Imagine a world where smartphones, laptops, wearables, and other electronics are powered without batteries. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have taken a step in that direction, with the first fully flexible device that can convert energy from Wi-Fi signals into electricity that could power electronics.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
How the Body Fights Cancer and Intruders
How the Body Fights Cancer and Intruders
The human body's immune system is like a vast team of special agents. Certain cells called T cells each individually specialize in recognizing a particular intruder, such as the influenza virus or salmonella. Determining a given T cell's target is a critical step in designing personalized treatments for cancers and developing vaccines.

Pedagogy - 28.01.2019
Screen time before bed puts children at risk of anxiety, obesity and poor sleep
Pre-teens who use a mobile phone or watch TV in the dark an hour before bed are at risk of not getting enough sleep, a new study reveals. The risk is comparatively lower for children who use these devices in a lit room or do not use them at all before bedtime. Pre-sleep device use The study by researchers from Imperial College London, the University of Lincoln, Birkbeck University and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Swit

Physics - 28.01.2019
Superconductors: Resistance is Futile
Superconductors: Resistance is Futile
New findings are changing the way we think about superconductivity. Experiments at TU Wien (Vienna) underline the special role of immobile charge carriers, acting as a 'glue', which makes superconductivity possible. Every standard cable, every wire, every electronic device has some electric resistance.

Environment - Transport - 28.01.2019
Emissions targets for transport sector can’t be met using natural gas alone
Using natural gas fuel with other methods could help road freight and shipping industries meet targets, says new Imperial College London white paper. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) - the United Nations' organisation for shipping - seeks to at least halve greenhouse gas emissions from ships by 2050 compared to 2008 levels.

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