News 2019


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Results 3421 - 3440 of 3521.


Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
New report reveals stark north south divide in painkiller prescribing
A new report has revealed that patients in the north of the country are being prescribed almost four times more opioids to relieve pain than those in the south. The research by the University of Nottingham's School of Pharmacy and the University of Manchester is the first national study to examine the regional variations in opioid prescribing and how this links with socioeconomic status.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
A metabolic checkpoint for embryonic stem cell differentiation
A metabolic checkpoint for embryonic stem cell differentiation
Upon exit from self-renewal, embryonic stem cells differentiate into different types of tissues - a process regulated by various complex mechanisms. Recent work published by the Betschinger group shows the importance of the lysosome - which is directly associated with cellular metabolism and nutrition - in developmental progression.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.01.2019
Double Star System Flips Planet-Forming Disk into Pole Position
Harvard & Smithsonian has found the first confirmed example of a double star system that has flipped its surrounding disc to a position that leaps over the orbital plane of those stars. The international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) to obtain high-resolution images of the Asteroid belt-sized disc.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.01.2019
Open star clusters live longer than previously assumed
Open star clusters live longer than previously assumed
Heidelberg researchers study the impact of their formation conditions on life-expectancy Open star clusters offer astronomers the unique opportunity to observe stars of comparable age and chemical composition at the same distance. A study under the direction of Associate Professor Dr Geneviève Parmentier at the Centre for Astronomy of Heidelberg University now shows that these clusters can have a much longer lifespan than previously assumed.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.01.2019
Herbal antioxidants are becoming increasingly important
Herbal antioxidants are becoming increasingly important
Secondary plant compounds as an alternative to antioxidant vitamins and minerals The human organism is constantly exposed to so-called free radicals, which are a burden on the body. If they get out of hand, the result is oxidative stress, which can promote disease. While this has been treated in the past with the help of antioxidant vitamins and minerals, scientists are now increasingly turning to the use of phytochemicals, representing plant secondary metabolites.

Health - 14.01.2019
Reducing out of pocket health costs associated with better population health: study
Reducing out of pocket health costs associated with better population health: study
Reducing user charges is associated with improved health outcomes in low and middle-income countries, new research has found. The first systematic review of the relationship between user charges and health outcomes in lower middle-income countries, published in BMJ Global Health, found that reducing user charges for vulnerable populations can reduce financial hardship from healthcare payments, which in turn improves health outcomes and promotes health equity.

Environment - 11.01.2019
'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking
’Realistic’ new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking
Accurately predicting fracture mechanics can help industry optimize pumping, fracturing-fluid viscosity, other parameters This work offers improved predictive capability that enables better control of production while reducing the environmental footprint by using less fracturing fluid. Hari Viswanathan LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Jan.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Predicting and preventing preterm births
Each year, 15 million babies worldwide are born prematurely, arriving at least three weeks before their due dates. Globally, prematurity is the largest cause of death before age 5, and even with excellent medical care, children who survive can have lasting physical, developmental and cognitive challenges.

Economics / Business - 11.01.2019
Why people make up their minds sooner than they realize
You may think you are being prudent in taking the time to gather as much information as possible before making up your mind, but a new study finds that people consume far less information than expected before making judgments and decisions. Whether buying a new car, hiring a job candidate or getting married, people assume they can and will use more information to make their decisions than they actually end up using, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
Microbes screened with a new microfluidic process might be used in power generation or environmental cleanup. Living in extreme conditions requires creative adaptations. For certain species of bacteria that exist in oxygen-deprived environments, this means finding a way to breathe that doesn't involve oxygen.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Economics / Business - 11.01.2019
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Research shows how financial markets should have predicted Brexit hours before they eventually did, and that betting markets beat currency markets to the result by an hour - producing a "close to risk-free" profit-making opportunity, according to economists.   It looks like the gamblers had a better sense that Leave could win, or that it could at least go either way Tom Auld International finance markets lagged behind punters having a flutter whe

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2019
Gene-editing tool now being used to develop better antibiotics
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jason Peters, (608) 265-6744, jason.peters [at] wisc (p) edu × A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher and his collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2019
Autistic people urgently need access to tailored mental health support
New research has revealed that people diagnosed with autism don't have access to effective mental health support, putting them at risk of self-harm and suicide. Researchers from the University of Nottingham, Coventry University and the University of Cambridge worked with a steering group of Autistic adults to design and carry out the research which has recenlty been published in the journal Autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
A new drug delays motor neurone disease progression and improves cognitive and clinical symptoms according to trial results announced by a spin-out company from the Florey and University of Melbourne. A new drug developed by scientists at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience , and the School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute at the University of Melbourne has dramatically improved clinical and cognitive symptoms of motor neurone disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
ESA's high-energy space telescopes Integral and XMM-Newton have helped to find a source of powerful X-rays at the centre of an unprecedentedly bright and rapidly evolving stellar explosion that suddenly appeared in the sky earlier this year. The ATLAS telescope in Hawaii first spotted the phenomenon, since then named AT2018cow, on 16 June.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Brain's 'support cells' help mammals to keep time
Brain’s ’support cells’ help mammals to keep time
'Caretaker' cells which support neurons in the brain play more of an active role in circadian rhythms and animal behaviour than previously thought. Astrocytes are star-shaped nerve cells found in the brain and spinal cord that were thought to support neurons in regulating circadian rhythms - the body's internal 24-hour 'clock'.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.01.2019
New drug against the formation of metastasis
New drug against the formation of metastasis
The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis. It spreads cancer cells throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. The development of metastasis is responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths, and patients with a metastatic disease are considered incurable.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
In all the noise that comprises our national news landscape these days, noise itself doesn't often rise to the level of news. That changed in 2016 when U.S. diplomats stationed in Cuba in October repeatedly reported hearing high-pitched sounds that were followed by hearing loss and other medical symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
UCLA researchers led by Dr. Donald Kohn have created a method for modifying blood stem cells to reverse the genetic mutation that causes a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome called IPEX. The gene therapy, which was tested in mice, is similar to the technique Kohn has used to cure patients with another immune disease, severe combined immune deficiency, or SCID, also known as bubble baby disease.