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Results 3441 - 3460 of 3521.


Physics - 10.01.2019
More stable light comes from intentionally 'squashed' quantum dots
More stable light comes from intentionally ’squashed’ quantum dots
Exploiting new 'strain engineering' approach produces highly stable, narrow linewidth light from individual quantum dots The squashed dots also show compatibility with virtually any substrate or embedding medium as well as various chemical and biological environments. Victor Klimov LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Jan.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Immune system’s front-line defense freezes bacteria in their tracks
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE × In the moments leading up to assault by a short, peculiar peptide, the bacteria are happily growing, their DNA jiggling around the cell in the semi-random motions characteristic of life. Seconds later, the jiggling stops. Life grinds to a halt. Some 100 million peptides - short chunks of amino acids, the basic units of proteins - by the name of LL-37 have invaded the cell, where, with strong electric charges, they've bound tightly to the machinery driving the cell, immobilizing and killing it.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Signatures of a 'messy' star that made its companion go supernova
Signatures of a ’messy’ star that made its companion go supernova
Many stars explode as luminous supernovae when, swollen with age, they run out of fuel for nuclear fusion. But some stars can go supernova simply because they have a close and pesky companion star that, one day, perturbs its partner so much that it explodes. These latter events can happen in binary star systems, where two stars attempt to share dominion.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Giving Cas9 an 'on' switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
Giving Cas9 an ’on’ switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
CRISPR-Cas9 is a revolutionary tool in part because of its versatility: created by bacteria to chew up viruses, it works equally well in human cells to do all sorts of genetic tricks, including cutting and pasting DNA, making pinpoint mutations and activating or inactivating a gene. UC Berkeley researchers have now made it even more versatile by giving it an "on" switch, allowing users to keep the Cas9 gene editor turned off in all cells except its designated target.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Researchers of the University of Bern have discovered a new molecular regulatory mechanism in unicellular parasites which has never before been observed. RNA fragments do not act as brakes in the cell apparatus, but on the contrary as "stimulants": they boost protein production after periods of stress.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Speeding up genetic diagnosis of Huntington’s disease
Elongated segments of DNA cause Huntington's disease and certain other disorders of the brain. Researchers have developed a method to determine the length of the mutated genes quickly and easily. People with Huntington's disease suffer from jerky body movements and decreasing mental abilities. The condition usually leads to death 15-20 years after diagnosis.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.01.2019
How Drugs Can Minimize the Side Effects of Chemotherapy
Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of the receptor that causes nausea and vomiting as a result of cancer chemotherapy. The study explains for the first time why some drugs work particularly well in ameliorating these side effects. The results also provide important insights into how to develop compounds to effectively tackle other disorders.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.01.2019
Crop plants could now reproduce clonally through seeds
Crop plants could now reproduce clonally through seeds
Grown throughout the world, F1 hybrid crop varieties have highly desirable traits. However, they remain expensive to produce. This situation may be about to change. By modifying the expression of certain genes, INRA researchers have created hybrid rice plants whose seeds give rise to offspring that are identical to the mother plant.

Life Sciences - 10.01.2019
Men and women remember pain differently
Scientists increasingly believe that one of the driving forces in chronic pain-the number one health problem in both prevalence and burden-appears to be the memory of earlier pain. Research published today in Current Biology suggests that there may be variations, based on sex, in the way that pain is remembered in both mice and humans.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Data captured by ESA's galaxy-mapping spacecraft Gaia has revealed for the first time how white dwarfs, the dead remnants of stars like our Sun, turn into solid spheres as the hot gas inside them cools down. This process of solidification, or crystallisation, of the material inside white dwarfs was predicted 50 years ago but it wasn't until the arrival of Gaia that astronomers were able to observe enough of these objects with such a precision to see the pattern revealing this process.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2019
Potential new way to target norovirus family
Researchers have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how a family of viruses, including the norovirus, initiate infections. The new study which includes norovirus and sapoviruses - highly infectious viruses that can cause outbreaks of diarrhoea and vomiting. It is hoped this research may provide a new target for the development of antiviral drugs to prevent diseases like norovirus.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.01.2019
Shows single atoms can make more efficient catalysts
Detailed observations of iridium atoms at work could help make catalysts that drive chemical reactions smaller, cheaper and more efficient. Catalysts are chemical matchmakers: They bring other chemicals close together, increasing the chance that they'll react with each other and produce something people want, like fuel or fertilizer.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.01.2019
X-ray pulse detected near event horizon as black hole devours star
X-ray pulse detected near event horizon as black hole devours star
Pulse pattern suggests distant black hole must be spinning at least at 50 percent the speed of light. On Nov. 22, 2014, astronomers spotted a rare event in the night sky: A supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy, nearly 300 million light-years from Earth, ripping apart a passing star. The event, known as a tidal disruption flare, for the black hole's massive tidal pull that tears a star apart, created a burst of X-ray activity near the center of the galaxy.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2019
Tumors are not as addicted to glucose as previously thought
Tumors are not as addicted to glucose as previously thought
Scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered that squamous cell skin cancers do not require increased glucose to power their development and growth, contrary to a long-held belief about cancer metabolism. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the metabolic needs of many different types of cancer, and to the development of new cancer treatments.

Innovation - 09.01.2019
Batteries predicted to become the cheapest option for storing electricity
Batteries predicted to become the cheapest option for storing electricity
By 2050, batteries based on lithium-ion will be the cheapest way to store electricity, such as from solar or wind farms, according to a new study. The new research calculates the cost of storing energy with different technologies, including large-scale batteries and pumped-storage hydroelectricity, and predicts those costs into the future.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
After mapping millions of galaxies, Dark Energy Survey finishes data collection
For the past six years, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has been part of an international effort to create an unprecedented survey of distant galaxies and better understand the nature of dark energy-the mysterious force accelerating the expansion of the universe. After scanning about a quarter of the southern skies over 800 nights, the Dark Energy Survey finished taking data on Jan.

Earth Sciences - 09.01.2019
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
The nutrient cycles that underpin how carbon is stored and released from two of Greenland's glaciers is significantly affected by subglacial weathering, a new study has found, shedding further light on the geochemistry of meltwaters. The study, led by a team of isotope geochemists and glaciologists from the University of Bristol, measured the geochemical signature of the silica released from the Leverett Glacier in Southwest Greenland and the Kiattuut Sermiat in South Greenland.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar
Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar
Halo of highly energized electrons around the black hole contracts dramatically during feeding frenzy. On March 11, an instrument aboard the International Space Station detected an enormous explosion of X-ray light that grew to be six times as bright as the Crab Nebula, nearly 10,000 light years away from Earth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Magnetar Mysteries in our Galaxy and Beyond
Magnetar Mysteries in our Galaxy and Beyond
In a new Caltech-led study, researchers from campus and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have analyzed pulses of radio waves coming from a magnetar-a rotating, dense, dead star with a strong magnetic field-that is located near the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy. The new research provides clues that magnetars like this one, lying in close proximity to a black hole, could perhaps be linked to the source of "fast radio bursts," or FRBs.