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Results 41 - 60 of 1280.


Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.05.2019
Water cycle wrapped
15 May 2019 As our climate changes, the availability of freshwater is a growing issue for many people around the world. Understanding the water cycle and how the climate and human usage is causing shifts in natural cycling processes is vital to safeguarding supplies. While numerous satellites measure individual components of the water cycle, it has never been described as a whole over a particular region - until now.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.05.2019
Mapping microbial symbioses in forests
Data collected from over 1 million forest plots reveals patterns of where plant roots form symbiotic relationships with fungi and bacteria. In and around the tangled roots of the forest floor, fungi and bacteria grow with trees, exchanging nutrients for carbon in a vast, global marketplace. A new effort to map the most abundant of these symbiotic relationships - involving more than 1.1 million forest sites and 28,000 tree species - has revealed factors that determine where different types of symbionts will flourish.

Physics - 15.05.2019
Tug-of-war drives magnetic north sprint
Tug-of-war drives magnetic north sprint
15 May 2019 As far as we know, Earth's magnetic north has always wandered, but it has recently gained new momentum and is making a dash towards Siberia at a pace not seen before. While this has some practical implications, scientists believe that this sprint is being caused by tussling magnetic blobs deep below our feet.

Social Sciences - 15.05.2019
In political messages, values matter more than policy
Stanford sociologists find that when progressive candidates talk about how their policies are aligned with values commonly associated with conservative ideals - as opposed to liberal ones - they receive greater support from conservatives and moderates. When political candidates talk about progressive economic policies in language consistent with traditionally conservative values - such as patriotism, the American dream, family and respect for tradition - they gain support among conservative and moderate Americans, according to a new Stanford study.

Health - Environment - 15.05.2019
How your clothes influence the air you breathe
How your clothes influence the air you breathe
Researchers have taken a critical look at how much we really know about our exposure to particles and chemicals transported by our clothing. His study concludes that further research is needed and opens up new areas of investigation. There is growing evidence that our clothing exposes us to particles and chemicals on a daily basis - and that this exposure could carry significant health risks.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.05.2019
Lowering blood pressure reduces brain bleeding in strokes
The search for treatments for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, the most devastating type of stroke, which carries a 40% mortality rate, has been rife with disappointments. But a new study suggests that intensive blood pressure lowering may reduce the amount of bleeding in deep areas of the brain in patients with the condition, a team of Yale researchers report May 13 in the journal JAMA Neurology.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
A new way to wind the development clock of cardiac muscle cells
These days, scientists can collect a few skin or blood cells, wipe out their identities, and reprogram them to become virtually any other kind of cell in the human body, from neurons to heart cells.    The journey from skin cell to  another type of  functional cell involves converting them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which  are  similar to the developmentally immature  stem  cells found in embryos, and then coaxing them to mature into  something different.

Computer Science / Telecom - 14.05.2019
Augmented reality affects people’s behavior in the real world
Stanford scholar Jeremy Bailenson and other researchers found that people's interactions with a virtual person in augmented reality, or AR, influenced how they behaved and acted in the physical world. As major technology firms race to roll out augmented reality products, Stanford researchers are learning how it affects people's behavior - in both the physical world and a digitally enhanced one.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.05.2019
Decoy antibiotics could get around bacteria's defences
Decoy antibiotics could get around bacteria’s defences
Imperial medical students have helped to devise a new type of 'decoy' drug to tackle infections that are resistant to antibiotics. In tests with cell cultures, the new drug successfully killed a strain of drug-resistant bacteria. It works by delivering two antibiotics, one of which is effectively hidden.

Environment - 14.05.2019
Mapping salty waters
Mapping salty waters
14 May 2019 The length and precision with which climate scientists can track the salinity, or saltiness, of the oceans is set to improve dramatically according to researchers working as part of ESA's Climate Change Initiative. Sea-surface salinity plays an important role in thermohaline ocean circulation.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.05.2019
Relay station in the brain controls our movements
Relay station in the brain controls our movements
The relay station of the brain, the substantia nigra consists of different types of nerve cells and is responsible for controlling the execution of diverse movements. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now characterized two of these cell populations more precisely and has been able to assign an exact function to each of them.

Pedagogy - 14.05.2019
Preschool education can benefit generations of families
Early childhood education programs can impact life outcomes in ways that span generations, according to new research from Nobel laureate James Heckman. In a pair of companion papers released this week , the pioneering University of Chicago economist found that the children of those who participated in a landmark 1960s study still saw improvements in education, health and employment.

Environment - 14.05.2019
New potential for tracking severe storms
New potential for tracking severe storms
14 May 2019 Even just within the last couple of months, Cyclones Fani, Idai and Kenneth have brought devastation to millions. With the frequency and severity of extreme weather like this expected to increase against the backdrop of climate change, it is more important than ever to forecast and track events accurately.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.05.2019
Fascinating microorganisms in perialpine lakes
Fascinating microorganisms in perialpine lakes
The lakes in the perialpine regions of Europe are home to a particular community of cyanobacteria which Marie-Eve Monchamp investigated in connection with her doctoral thesis at Eawag. "We collected sediment cores from ten lakes in Switzerland, Italy and France, and analysed the cyanobacterial DNA extracted from these cores", she explains.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.05.2019
EUMETSAT, Japanese space agency to cooperate on greenhouse gas monitoring
EUMETSAT and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) today signed an agreement which will result in the agencies working closely together to monitor greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere. Mr Kazuo Tachi, on behalf of the Direc tor General of JAXA's Space Technology Directorate 1 Ryoichi Imai, and EUMETSAT Director-General Alain Ratier signed the agreement at a ceremony at EUMETSAT's Darmstadt headquarters today.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
Symbionts as lifesavers
Symbionts as lifesavers
Researchers discover new factor influencing the spread of Legionella When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. But where do these pathogens come from and how do they thrive in the environment before the infection occurs' An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled this question using an important bacterial pathogen that causes lung disease.

Environment - 14.05.2019
Jakobshavn Isbrae Glacier bucks the trend
Jakobshavn Isbrae Glacier bucks the trend
14 May 2019 Our planet works in mysterious ways. We are all used to hearing about the world's ice being the first casualty of climate change and, indeed, it is declining fast. However, recent findings show that one glacier is not conforming to the norm - it's actually been flowing more slowly and getting thicker.

Health - 14.05.2019
New approach could improve heart attack care across Scotland
MSPs will tonight (Tuesday 14 May 2019) hear from University of Glasgow researchers how patients with life-threatening heart problems could benefit from a new approach to tracking treatments and outcomes throughout their care. An e-Registry of electronic health records has already helped Cardiologists bring together six care pathways for heart attack patients in the NHS.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
It’s in the Weeds: Herbicide Linked to Human Liver Disease
Exposure to glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the popular weed killer Roundup, correlates to more severe cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Glyphosate, the primary ingredient in Monsanto's popular weed killer Roundup, has been linked to liver disease in animal models. In a new study, the first of its kind, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine report an association between the herbicide and negative effects upon the human liver.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.05.2019
Second grant to bring research to market
05/14/2019 Getting an accurate picture of the real-time transcriptional activity of a cell: This is the goal of a new research project at the University of Würzburg which is funded by the European Research Council. If you paid attention during biology lessons, you may remember that genetic information in human cells is contained in the cell nucleus as a DNA double helix.