News 2019


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Results 41 - 60 of 128.


Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Business / Economics - 11.01.2019
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Research shows how financial markets should have predicted Brexit hours before they eventually did, and that betting markets beat currency markets to the result by an hour - producing a "close to risk-free" profit-making opportunity, according to economists.   It looks like the gamblers had a better sense that Leave could win, or that it could at least go either way Tom Auld International finance markets lagged behind punters having a flutter whe

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2019
Gene-editing tool now being used to develop better antibiotics
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jason Peters, (608) 265-6744, jason.peters [at] wisc (p) edu × A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher and his collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2019
Autistic people urgently need access to tailored mental health support
New research has revealed that people diagnosed with autism don't have access to effective mental health support, putting them at risk of self-harm and suicide. Researchers from the University of Nottingham, Coventry University and the University of Cambridge worked with a steering group of Autistic adults to design and carry out the research which has recenlty been published in the journal Autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
A new drug delays motor neurone disease progression and improves cognitive and clinical symptoms according to trial results announced by a spin-out company from the Florey and University of Melbourne. A new drug developed by scientists at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience , and the School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute at the University of Melbourne has dramatically improved clinical and cognitive symptoms of motor neurone disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
ESA's high-energy space telescopes Integral and XMM-Newton have helped to find a source of powerful X-rays at the centre of an unprecedentedly bright and rapidly evolving stellar explosion that suddenly appeared in the sky earlier this year. The ATLAS telescope in Hawaii first spotted the phenomenon, since then named AT2018cow, on 16 June.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Brain's 'support cells' help mammals to keep time
Brain’s ’support cells’ help mammals to keep time
'Caretaker' cells which support neurons in the brain play more of an active role in circadian rhythms and animal behaviour than previously thought. Astrocytes are star-shaped nerve cells found in the brain and spinal cord that were thought to support neurons in regulating circadian rhythms - the body's internal 24-hour 'clock'.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.01.2019
New drug against the formation of metastasis
New drug against the formation of metastasis
The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis. It spreads cancer cells throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. The development of metastasis is responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths, and patients with a metastatic disease are considered incurable.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
In all the noise that comprises our national news landscape these days, noise itself doesn't often rise to the level of news. That changed in 2016 when U.S. diplomats stationed in Cuba in October repeatedly reported hearing high-pitched sounds that were followed by hearing loss and other medical symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
UCLA researchers led by Dr. Donald Kohn have created a method for modifying blood stem cells to reverse the genetic mutation that causes a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome called IPEX. The gene therapy, which was tested in mice, is similar to the technique Kohn has used to cure patients with another immune disease, severe combined immune deficiency, or SCID, also known as bubble baby disease.

Physics - 10.01.2019
More stable light comes from intentionally squashed quantum dots
More stable light comes from intentionally squashed quantum dots
Exploiting new 'strain engineering' approach produces highly stable, narrow linewidth light from individual quantum dots Novel colloidal quantum dots are formed of an emitting cadmium/selenium (Cd/Se) core enclosed into a compositionally graded CdxZn1-xSe shell wherein the fraction of zinc versus cadmium increases towards the dot's periphery.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Immune system’s front-line defense freezes bacteria in their tracks
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE × In the moments leading up to assault by a short, peculiar peptide, the bacteria are happily growing, their DNA jiggling around the cell in the semi-random motions characteristic of life. Seconds later, the jiggling stops. Life grinds to a halt. Some 100 million peptides - short chunks of amino acids, the basic units of proteins - by the name of LL-37 have invaded the cell, where, with strong electric charges, they've bound tightly to the machinery driving the cell, immobilizing and killing it.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Signatures of a 'messy' star that made its companion go supernova
Signatures of a ’messy’ star that made its companion go supernova
Many stars explode as luminous supernovae when, swollen with age, they run out of fuel for nuclear fusion. But some stars can go supernova simply because they have a close and pesky companion star that, one day, perturbs its partner so much that it explodes. These latter events can happen in binary star systems, where two stars attempt to share dominion.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Giving Cas9 an 'on' switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
Giving Cas9 an ’on’ switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
CRISPR-Cas9 is a revolutionary tool in part because of its versatility: created by bacteria to chew up viruses, it works equally well in human cells to do all sorts of genetic tricks, including cutting and pasting DNA, making pinpoint mutations and activating or inactivating a gene. UC Berkeley researchers have now made it even more versatile by giving it an "on" switch, allowing users to keep the Cas9 gene editor turned off in all cells except its designated target.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.01.2019
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Researchers of the University of Bern have discovered a new molecular regulatory mechanism in unicellular parasites which has never before been observed. RNA fragments do not act as brakes in the cell apparatus, but on the contrary as "stimulants": they boost protein production after periods of stress.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Speeding up genetic diagnosis of Huntington’s disease
Elongated segments of DNA cause Huntington's disease and certain other disorders of the brain. Researchers have developed a method to determine the length of the mutated genes quickly and easily. People with Huntington's disease suffer from jerky body movements and decreasing mental abilities. The condition usually leads to death 15-20 years after diagnosis.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.01.2019
How Drugs Can Minimize the Side Effects of Chemotherapy
Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of the receptor that causes nausea and vomiting as a result of cancer chemotherapy. The study explains for the first time why some drugs work particularly well in ameliorating these side effects. The results also provide important insights into how to develop compounds to effectively tackle other disorders.

Life Sciences - 10.01.2019
Men and women remember pain differently
Scientists increasingly believe that one of the driving forces in chronic pain-the number one health problem in both prevalence and burden-appears to be the memory of earlier pain. Research published today in Current Biology suggests that there may be variations, based on sex, in the way that pain is remembered in both mice and humans.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Data captured by ESA's galaxy-mapping spacecraft Gaia has revealed for the first time how white dwarfs, the dead remnants of stars like our Sun, turn into solid spheres as the hot gas inside them cools down. This process of solidification, or crystallisation, of the material inside white dwarfs was predicted 50 years ago but it wasn't until the arrival of Gaia that astronomers were able to observe enough of these objects with such a precision to see the pattern revealing this process.