News 2019


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Results 41 - 60 of 1804.


Astronomy / Space Science - 16.07.2019
New measure of Hubble constant adds to mystery about universe’s expansion rate
University of Chicago scientists have made a new measurement of how fast the universe is expanding-using an entirely different kind of star than previous endeavors. That value falls in the center of a hotly debated question in astrophysics that may call for an entirely new model of the universe. Scientists have known for almost a century that the universe is expanding, but the exact number for how fast it's going has remained stubbornly elusive.

Life Sciences - 16.07.2019
Automated microscope gives a look inside live cell populations
Automated microscope gives a look inside live cell populations
From now on scientists can look at how living cells function and react under various experimental conditions, in parallel and throughout a the cell's lifetime. With the new 3D microscope unveiled today by EPFL spin-off Nanolive, researchers can observe the details of how cells operate - all the way down to their organelles.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.07.2019
Using ’mooncrete’ for building blocks on the moon
College of Engineering associate professor Ali Ghahremaninezhad (right) is testing different biopolymers to determine which would be most effective in turning lunar soil into a hardened, concrete-type substance. Photo: Evan Garcia/University of Miami College of Engineering associate professor Ali Ghahremaninezhad (right) is testing different biopolymers to determine which would be most effective in turning lunar soil into a hardened, concrete-type substance.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.07.2019
Bacterial defence construction revealed in step forward for new antibiotics
Bacterial defence construction revealed in step forward for new antibiotics
A crucial step in the way bacteria construct their defences has been revealed by an international team, including a University of Queensland researcher. Institute for Molecular Bioscience 's researcher Professor Ian Henderson said the finding had opened up a new pathway for designing improved antibiotics.

Environment - 15.07.2019
A new technique to concentrate a fertilizer produced from wastewater
A new technique to concentrate a fertilizer produced from wastewater
Two EPFL Master's in Environmental Engineering students have developed a novel method for recovering nitrogen from wastewater. For their semester project, they adapted a system typically used to concentrate fruit juice and tested it out at the Yverdon-les-Bains wastewater treatment plant in Vaud.  For their semester project, Océane Hames and Lucas Ott, two Master's students in Environmental Engineering at EPFL, chose to focus on the Yverdon-les-Bains wastewater treatment plant.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.07.2019
Investigation into fungal infection reveals genetic vulnerability in Hmong
Ten years ago, in Marathon County, Wisconsin, 55 people were sickened by an uncommon fungal infection called blastomycosis. Thirty patients were hospitalized. Two people died. The fungus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, found naturally in wet soil and in decomposing wood throughout the Great Lakes region and the Mississippi Valley, can cause flu-like illness and in severe cases, death.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.07.2019
Science of microdosing psychedelics ’remains patchy and anecdotal’, says review
The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence. The process, called microdosing, has been lauded by some, with high profile proponents in Silicon Valley. But to date, scientific evidence to support or even fully explore claims of the benefits and safety, has been lacking.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.07.2019
High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) May Prevent Cognitive Decline
High intensity interval training (HIIT) may be doing more than just keeping you fit and strong - it may also help prevent age-related cognitive illnesses, such as dementia. A University of Queensland study found high intensity interval exercise may be more effective than continuous exercise in increasing brain blood flow in older adults.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials
A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago. Their specialty: They move through a material in a well ordered manner that practically never lets them collide with each other and is thus very energy efficient. This implies intriguing possibilities for the electronics of the future.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Image of quantum entanglement
For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement - capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'. Two particles which interact with each other - like two photons passing through a beam splitter, for example - can sometimes remain connected, instantaneously sharing their physical states no matter how great the distance which separates them.

Microtechnics - Innovation / Technology - 12.07.2019
New dual-propeller drone can fly twice as long
New dual-propeller drone can fly twice as long
EPFL startup Flybotix has developed a novel drone with just two propellers and an advanced stabilization system that allow it to fly for twice as long as conventional models.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.07.2019
3-D imaging, AI reveal stories hidden in shells
A clam shell may be a familiar find on the beach, but its intricate curves and markings tell a rich tale. For centuries, biologists have collected, drawn, measured and compared the shells of bivalve species, pursuing knowledge about how the environment and behavior shape biodiversity. Now, University of Chicago scientists are combining high-resolution 3-D imaging with new geometric deep learning approaches to reveal a fuller version of the story hidden in shells.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Which is the perfect quantum theory?
Which is the perfect quantum theory?
Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking for patterns that are characteristic of specific objects. Provided the system has learned such patterns, it is able to recognize dogs or cats on any picture.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2019
Speed controllers for protein production
Speed controllers for protein production
The translation of the genetic code into proteins is a vital process in any cell. Researchers from the University of Basel have now uncovered important factors that influence the speed of protein synthesis in the cell. The results, recently published in "PNAS", serve as a basis to better analyze translational control in a wide range of cell types.

Environment - Materials Science - 12.07.2019
5000 tons of plastic released into the environment every year
5000 tons of plastic released into the environment every year
In order to estimate for the first time the exact extent of plastic pollution in Switzerland, the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) has mandated Empa researchers to calculate how much plastic gets into the environment. Empa has analyzed the seven most frequently used types of plastic. According to the study, more than 5000 tons of plastic are discharged into the environment every year.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.07.2019
New Findings on Early Bombardment of the Earth and Moon and Their Development
Freie Universität Researchers Contribute to International Study Published in Nature No 215/2019 from Jul 12, 2019 How did the Earth evolve from a fireball about 4.5 billion years ago to a habitable world? The key to this question lies in the early history of our planet, when the bombardment with cosmic bodies slowly declined.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 12.07.2019
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
How do neurons process information? Neurons are known to break down an incoming electrical signal into sub-units. Now, researchers at Blue Brain have discovered that dendrites, the neuron's tree-like receptors, work together - dynamically and depending on the workload - for learning. The findings further our understanding of how we think and may inspire new algorithms for artificial intelligence.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.07.2019
Neural sleep patterns emerged at least 450 million years ago
Researchers have found that brain patterns in sleeping zebrafish are similar to those of land vertebrates, suggesting that such sleep signatures developed before aquatic and land animals diverged. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that neural signatures in sleeping zebrafish are analogous to those of humans, suggesting that the brain activity evolved at least 450 million years ago, before any creatures crawled out of the ocean.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 11.07.2019
Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets
Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets
In recent years, the idea of life on other planets has become less far-fetched. NASA announced June 27 that it will send a vehicle to Saturn's icy moon Titan , a celestial body known to harbor surface lakes of methane and an ice-covered ocean of water, boosting its chance for supporting life. On Earth, scientists are studying the most extreme environments to learn how life might exist under completely different settings, like on other planets.

Life Sciences - 11.07.2019
Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division
Scientists gain new insights into the mechanisms of cell division
Mitosis is the process by which the genetic information encoded on chromosomes is equally distributed to two daughter cells, a fundamental feature of all life on earth. Scientists led by Alexander Dammermann at the Max Perutz Labs, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, now examine how centrioles contribute to this process.