News 2019


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Results 401 - 420 of 3520.


Environment - Chemistry - 18.11.2019
Climate change could double greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater ecosystems
For Cambridge students For our researchers Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University Equality and diversity

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 18.11.2019
Alliance for additive manufacturing
Alliance for additive manufacturing
TUM, Oerlikon and Linde develop high-strength lightweight aluminum-based alloy New research alliance for additive manufacturing Together with the Swiss technology group Oerlikon and the industrial gas manufacturer Linde, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has entered into a research alliance for additive manufacturing (AM).

Environment - 18.11.2019
’Rapid increase’ in global wind speeds
Wind speeds across the globe have increased rapidly over the past decade signalling good news for the renewable energy industry, scientists say. New findings have shown that a worrying trend of decreasing wind speeds since the 1970s, a phenomenon known as global terrestrial stilling, has now been reversed with a significant increase observed since 2010.

Environment - 18.11.2019
Saving ’Half-Earth’ for nature would affect over a billion people
For Cambridge students For our researchers Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University Equality and diversity

Environment - Economics / Business - 18.11.2019
Climate change expert outlines humanity’s role in speeding global warming
Climate change expert Professor Sir David Hendry will explore how humanity has accelerated global warming when he delivers the annual China Institute Li Siguang lecture at the University of Birmingham on Wednesday 20th November. And his talk 'Climate Change in the Long Run' will illustrate how climatologists, volcanologists, dendrochronologists, meteorologists, geophysicists and health scientists are working together to tackle climate change and its consequences.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.11.2019
Antibiotics from the sea
Antibiotics from the sea
Research team cultivates marine bacteria that had previously been paid little attention and taps potential source of new antibiotics Life The team led by Prof. Christian Jogler of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has succeeded in cultivating several dozen marine bacteria in the laboratory - bacteria that had previously been paid little attention.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.11.2019
Improving the odds for patients with heart pumps
Improving the odds for patients with heart pumps
A new Yale study shows that some patients being treated for severe heart failure with a battery-operated pump saw significant improvement after additionally using neurohormonal blockade (NHB) drug therapy. NHB therapy, which includes three broad categories of drugs, including ACE inhibitors, has long been the standard therapy for treating heart failure.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.11.2019
How to make the world’s most powerful neutrino beam
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and its international partners on Nov. 14 broke ground on an innovative experiment that aims to answer some of the biggest questions about the universe.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 18.11.2019
Among transgender children, gender identity as strong as in cisgender children
Among transgender children, gender identity as strong as in cisgender children
Children who identify as the gender matching their sex at birth tend to gravitate toward the toys, clothing and friendships stereotypically associated with that gender. Transgender children do the same with the gender they identify as, regardless of how long they have actually lived as a member of that gender.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.11.2019
Scientists make vampire bats ’glow’ to simulate vaccine spread
Scientists have used 'glowing' fluorescent gel to estimate the potential effectiveness of spreadable vaccines to control diseases in wild bats. The study - led by researchers at the Universities of Glasgow and Michigan, and published today in Nature Ecology and Evolution - found that a low effort vaccination programme could substantially reduce rabies transmission in wild vampire bats, thereby reducing the risk of lethal infections in humans and livestock.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.11.2019
Invasive heart treatments often needless
A large, international study led by Stanford and New York University found that invasive procedures are no better than medications and lifestyle advice at treating heart disease that's severe but stable. Patients with severe but stable heart disease who are treated with medications and lifestyle advice alone are no more at risk of a heart attack or death than those who undergo invasive surgical procedures, according to a large, federally-funded clinical trial led by researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine and New York University's medical school.

Health - Social Sciences - 18.11.2019
Immigrants don’t move state-to-state in search of health benefits
When states expand public health insurance to include low-income, legal immigrants, it does not lead to out-of-state immigrants moving in search of benefits. Immigrants, once settled in a particular state, will not move to another state in search of public health benefits, Stanford researchers find. Their research, published Nov.

Physics - 18.11.2019
A Remote Control for Everything Small
A Remote Control for Everything Small
Atoms, molecules or even living cells can be manipulated with light beams. At TU Wien a method was developed to revolutionize such "optical tweezers". They are reminiscent of the "tractor beam" in Star Trek: special light beams can be used to manipulate molecules or small biological particles. Even viruses or cells can be captured or moved.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.11.2019
Body’s protection shield
Scientists have discovered a way to manipulate the body's own immune response to help boost tissue repair. The findings, published in Current Biology today [18 Nov], reveal a new network of protective factors to shield cells against damage. This discovery, made by University of Bristol researchers, could significantly benefit patients undergoing surgery by speeding recovery times and lowering the risk of complication.

Life Sciences - 18.11.2019
Mitochondrial Mixing Mechanism Critical for Sperm Production in Mice
Mitochondria, often thought of as the powerhouses of cells, are just one part of a larger living thing, but they are unique among cellular structures in that they have their own DNA that is distinct from that of their parent cells. And just like their parent cells, mitochondria need quality-control mechanisms to maintain their DNA and preserve their normal function.

Environment - Microtechnics - 18.11.2019
Bees "Surf" Atop Water
Walking on Caltech's campus, research engineer Chris Roh (MS '13, PhD '17) happened to see a bee stuck in the water of Millikan Pond. Although it was a common-enough sight, it led Roh and his advisor, Mory Gharib (PhD '83), to a discovery about the potentially unique way that bees navigate the interface between water and air.

Environment - 18.11.2019
A century later, plant biodiversity struggles in wake of agricultural abandonment
Decades after farmland was abandoned, plant biodiversity and productivity struggle to recover, according to new University of Minnesota research. Published Ecology & Evolution , researchers examined 37 years of data tied to plant biodiversity (i.e., number of different species) and plant productivity (i.e., biomass or amount of plants) related to 21 grasslands and savannas in Minnesota.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.11.2019
Ketogenic diet helps tame flu virus
A high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet like the Keto regimen has its fans, but influenza apparently isn't one of them. Mice fed a ketogenic diet were better able to combat the flu virus than mice fed food high in carbohydrates, according to a new Yale University study published Nov. Immunology.

Environment - Innovation - 15.11.2019
EPFL creates a solar cooker with solid potential in Switzerland
EPFL creates a solar cooker with solid potential in Switzerland
EPFL scientists have developed a glass-paneled solar cooker that delivers exceptional performance. Their patented design can operate an average of 155 days a year in Switzerland's cloudiest regions and up to 240 days in its sunniest. Solar cookers - or solar-powered ovens - can be used to cook foods at low temperatures (60-120°C) for anywhere from 30 minutes up to four hours.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 15.11.2019
Weed diversity mitigates crop yield losses
Weed diversity mitigates crop yield losses
Scientists from Inra and the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna (Italy) have shown that not all weed communities (spontaneous vegetation) generate crop yield losses, even in unweeded conditions, and that high weed diversity is associated to a reduced risk of important crop yield losses. Published in Nature Sustainability , these results provide new grounds for sustainable weed management.