News 2019


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Results 61 - 80 of 3025.


Life Sciences - Psychology - 04.11.2019
Stressed to the max? Deep sleep can rewire the anxious brain
Anxiety keeps us awake, but deep sleep can soothe the anxious brain, according to new study. (iStockphoto) When it comes to managing anxiety disorders, William Shakespeare's Macbeth had it right when he referred to sleep as the "balm of hurt minds." While a full night of slumber stabilizes emotions, a sleepless night can trigger up to a 30% rise in anxiety levels, according to new research from UC Berkeley.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.11.2019
Swordfish as oceanographers? Satellite tags allow research of ocean's 'twilight zone' off Florida
Swordfish as oceanographers? Satellite tags allow research of ocean’s ’twilight zone’ off Florida
Researchers from the University of Washington are using high-tech tags to record the movements of swordfish - big, deep-water, migratory, open-ocean fish that are poorly studied - and get a window into the ocean depths they inhabit. The researchers tagged five swordfish in late August off the coast of Miami: Max , Simone , Anthony , Rex and Oliver.

Computer Science / Telecom - 04.11.2019
Machine Learning Algorithms Help Predict Traffic Headaches
Machine Learning Algorithms Help Predict Traffic Headaches
U rban traffic roughly follows a periodic pattern associated with the typical "9 to 5" work schedule. However, when an accident happens, traffic patterns are disrupted. Designing accurate traffic flow models, for use during accidents, is a major challenge for traffic engineers, who must adapt to unforeseen traffic scenarios in real time.

Life Sciences - Physics - 04.11.2019
Scientists capture dynamic brain in action
Scientists routinely capture images of the brain in action by focusing on single molecules, cells, or circuits. But visualizing how these tiny units interact to create complex behavior has been a daunting task. Now, in a collaborative, multi-lab effort, researchers at Yale University have developed a way to leverage a pair of microscopic technologies to provide a glimpse of the entire brain at work in real time.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.11.2019
Light-based 'tractor beam' assembles materials at the nanoscale
Light-based ’tractor beam’ assembles materials at the nanoscale
Modern construction is a precision endeavor. Builders must use components manufactured to meet specific standards - such as beams of a desired composition or rivets of a specific size. The building industry relies on manufacturers to create these components reliably and reproducibly in order to construct secure bridges and sound skyscrapers.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.11.2019
Reveals how brain injury can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder in U.S. military members frequently follows a concussion-like brain injury. Until now, it has been unclear why. A UCLA team of psychologists and neurologists reports that a traumatic brain injury causes changes in a brain region called the amygdala; and the brain processes fear differently after such an injury.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.11.2019
Scientists spy unstable semiconductors
Scientists from Cardiff University have, for the first time, spotted previously unseen “instabilities” on the surface of a common compound semiconductor material. The findings could potentially have profound consequences for the development of future materials in the electronic devices that power our daily lives.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 04.11.2019
From cone snail venom to pain relief
From cone snail venom to pain relief
Conotoxins are bioactive peptides found in the venom that marine cone snails produce for prey capture and defense. They are used as pharmacological tools to study pain signalling and have the potential to become a new class of analgesics. To date, more than 10,000 conotoxin sequences have been discovered.

Social Sciences - 04.11.2019
Youth mental health: right level of care needed, first time
Sydney researchers detail a youth mental health model - the result of years of work from the Brain and Mind Centre - based on their findings that the common 'stepped care' approach may be too little, too late. A model of care emphasising early access to assessment for young people needing mental health care, and the ongoing provision of stage-appropriate and effective, multidisciplinary interventions, has been proposed by a group of researchers from the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.11.2019
Synthetic phages with programmable specificity
Synthetic phages with programmable specificity
ETH researchers are using synthetic biology to reprogram bacterial viruses - commonly known as bacteriophages - to expand their natural host range. This technology paves the way for the therapeutic use of standardized, synthetic bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections. Bacteriophages ("phages" for short) are viruses that infect bacteria.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.11.2019
Researchers identify certain gut bacteria that may be involved in causing bowel cancer
People who have a certain type of bacteria in their guts may be at greater risk of developing bowel cancer. The findings were presented by University of Bristol researcher, Dr Kaitlin Wade, at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow today [4 Nov]. While there is increasing evidence that the make-up of the gut microbiome plays a role in the human health and the body's susceptibility to disease including an association between the microbiome and bowel cancer, very few have provided convincing evidence for causality.

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 04.11.2019
Discriminating diets of meat-eating dinosaurs
Discriminating diets of meat-eating dinosaurs
A big problem with dinosaurs is that there seem to be too many meat-eaters. From studies of modern animals, there is a feeding pyramid, with plants at the bottom, then plant-eaters, and then meat-eaters at the top. A new study by scientists at the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences , published in the journal Palaeontology, shows that dinosaurian meat-eaters, the theropod dinosaurs, specialised a great deal, and so broadened their food base.

Earth Sciences - 04.11.2019
New way to date rocks
A new way to date a common mineral could help pinpoint ore deposits and improve mineral exploration globally, according to University of Queensland scientists. The researchers have identified a new reference material and used a state-of-the-art instrument to better date rock formations in central Asia.

Environment - 01.11.2019
Palestinian farmers benefit from Birmingham water technology project
Palestinian farmers benefit from Birmingham water technology project
University of Birmingham scientists have worked with international students to produce prototype desalination equipment that could help Palestinian farmers avoid water shortages and grow crops efficiently. The equipment is built from off-the-shelf parts and could be deployed easily and relatively cheaply across the Middle East.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.11.2019
Shows heavy smoking can have a damaging effect on facial ageing
Heavy smoking may have a causal effect on facial ageing, according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study searched across 18,000 traits from the UK Biobank cohort to identify those that may be affected by how heavily someone smokes. As well as recognising several known adverse effects such as on lung health, the research also found heavy smoking could influence appearance.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.11.2019
New MOF Can Take On Toxic Sulfur Dioxide Gas
New MOF Can Take On Toxic Sulfur Dioxide Gas
An international team has developed a robust material that can selectively take in toxic sulfur dioxide gas at record concentrations and preserve it for use in chemical production. The researchers verified its performance using a combination of techniques that included X-ray experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Advanced Light Source (ALS).

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 01.11.2019
Perfectly Raw or Cooked to Perfection? How Food Preparation Affects the Gut Microbiome
Perfectly Raw or Cooked to Perfection? How Food Preparation Affects the Gut Microbiome
Study reveals intriguing first look at differences caused by eating raw vs cooked meat and vegetables The gut microbiome undergoes rapid and dramatic changes in species composition and gene expression when the host switches between eating cooked or raw vegetables, according to a team of scientists led by UC San Francisco and Harvard University.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.11.2019
Gaming Protein Structures: X-Ray Studies Confirm Power of Crowdsourcing
Gaming Protein Structures: X-Ray Studies Confirm Power of Crowdsourcing
The unique ways in which proteins fold dictate their interplay with diseases and medicines, so understanding their twists and turns is key to designing effective drugs. While new drug design is serious work, discovering how proteins fold can be fun, too: A crowdsourcing game called Foldit allows players to try different fold configurations for points and rankings.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.11.2019
New Glasgow Cancer Tests for research and clinical trials
The Glasgow Precision Oncology Laboratory (GPOL) at the University of Glasgow has developed a ground-breaking new cancer test for research and clinical trials that could ultimately change the way cancer medicine is delivered. The Glasgow Cancer Tests are a suite of affordable solid tumour and blood cancer tests, developed specifically to enable patients to benefit from real-world precision medicine-based cancer treatments.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 01.11.2019
A bird in the nest and moving to Mars: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From bird-chick recognition, to Mars explorations, here is some quick-read news from across the College. A bird in the nest Passerine (or ‘perching') birds do not differentiate between the chicks in their nest - meaning they potentially raise chicks that aren't theirs, such as those that are the product of a cheating partner.

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