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Results 61 - 80 of 128.


Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2019
Potential new way to target norovirus family
Researchers have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how a family of viruses, including the norovirus, initiate infections. The new study which includes norovirus and sapoviruses - highly infectious viruses that can cause outbreaks of diarrhoea and vomiting. It is hoped this research may provide a new target for the development of antiviral drugs to prevent diseases like norovirus.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.01.2019
Shows single atoms can make more efficient catalysts
Detailed observations of iridium atoms at work could help make catalysts that drive chemical reactions smaller, cheaper and more efficient. Catalysts are chemical matchmakers: They bring other chemicals close together, increasing the chance that they'll react with each other and produce something people want, like fuel or fertilizer.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.01.2019
X-ray pulse detected near event horizon as black hole devours star
X-ray pulse detected near event horizon as black hole devours star
Pulse pattern suggests distant black hole must be spinning at least at 50 percent the speed of light. On Nov. 22, 2014, astronomers spotted a rare event in the night sky: A supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy, nearly 300 million light-years from Earth, ripping apart a passing star. The event, known as a tidal disruption flare, for the black hole's massive tidal pull that tears a star apart, created a burst of X-ray activity near the center of the galaxy.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2019
Tumors are not as addicted to glucose as previously thought
Tumors are not as addicted to glucose as previously thought
Scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered that squamous cell skin cancers do not require increased glucose to power their development and growth, contrary to a long-held belief about cancer metabolism. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the metabolic needs of many different types of cancer, and to the development of new cancer treatments.

Innovation / Technology - 09.01.2019
Batteries predicted to become the cheapest option for storing electricity
Batteries predicted to become the cheapest option for storing electricity
By 2050, batteries based on lithium-ion will be the cheapest way to store electricity, such as from solar or wind farms, according to a new study. The new research calculates the cost of storing energy with different technologies, including large-scale batteries and pumped-storage hydroelectricity, and predicts those costs into the future.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
After mapping millions of galaxies, Dark Energy Survey finishes data collection
For the past six years, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has been part of an international effort to create an unprecedented survey of distant galaxies and better understand the nature of dark energy-the mysterious force accelerating the expansion of the universe. After scanning about a quarter of the southern skies over 800 nights, the Dark Energy Survey finished taking data on Jan.

Earth Sciences - 09.01.2019
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
The nutrient cycles that underpin how carbon is stored and released from two of Greenland's glaciers is significantly affected by subglacial weathering, a new study has found, shedding further light on the geochemistry of meltwaters. The study, led by a team of isotope geochemists and glaciologists from the University of Bristol, measured the geochemical signature of the silica released from the Leverett Glacier in Southwest Greenland and the Kiattuut Sermiat in South Greenland.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar
Astronomers observe evolution of a black hole as it wolfs down stellar
Halo of highly energized electrons around the black hole contracts dramatically during feeding frenzy. On March 11, an instrument aboard the International Space Station detected an enormous explosion of X-ray light that grew to be six times as bright as the Crab Nebula, nearly 10,000 light years away from Earth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Magnetar Mysteries in our Galaxy and Beyond
Magnetar Mysteries in our Galaxy and Beyond
In a new Caltech-led study, researchers from campus and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have analyzed pulses of radio waves coming from a magnetar-a rotating, dense, dead star with a strong magnetic field-that is located near the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy. The new research provides clues that magnetars like this one, lying in close proximity to a black hole, could perhaps be linked to the source of "fast radio bursts," or FRBs.

Environment - 09.01.2019
Is using drones to tackle climate change
Is using drones to tackle climate change
A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests. The findings of the study - ‘ A view from above: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles provide a new tool for assessing liana infestation in tropical forest canopies' , have been published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.01.2019
Nanocrystals Get Better When They Double Up With MOFs
Nanocrystals Get Better When They Double Up With MOFs
Researchers develop design rules for self-assembling 2D nanocrystal/metal-organic framework-based materials for energy storage and catalysis applications VIDEO: Simulation of self-assembling 2D nanocrystal/MOF superstructure. (Credit: Jeff Urban et al./Berkeley Lab) Out of the box, crystalline MOFs (metal-organic frameworks) look like ordinary salt crystals.

Chemistry - Innovation / Technology - 09.01.2019
Viennese Scientists develop promising new type of polymers
Viennese Scientists develop promising new type of polymers
S-PPV polymers are suitable for use in a wide range of applications, from solar cells through to medicine but, until recently, they were almost impossible to produce. Now, a new synthetic method has been patented. Organic polymers can nowadays be found in solar cells, sensors, LEDs and in many other technical applications.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.01.2019
XMM-Newton captures final cries of star shredded by black hole
XMM-Newton captures final cries of star shredded by black hole
Astronomers using ESA's XMM-Newton space observatory have studied a black hole devouring a star and discovered an exceptionally bright and stable signal that allowed them to determine the black hole's spin rate. Black holes are thought to lurk at the centre of all massive galaxies throughout the Universe, and are inextricably tied to the properties of their host galaxies.

Mathematics - 09.01.2019
Census data could be used to improve city neighbourhoods
A new analysis of the 2011 census has revealed that social differences among city populations significantly influence how neighbourhoods take shape. Researchers hope that their insights could help councils to make better planning decisions. Dr Thilo Gross and Dr Edmund Barter in the Department of Engineering Mathematics at the University of Bristol, used a new algorithm to gain insight into city neighbourhood characteristics, starting with Bristol.

Astronomy / Space Science - Administration - 09.01.2019
Canada’s CHIME telescope detects second repeating fast radio burst
A Canadian-led team of scientists has found the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) ever recorded. FRBs are short bursts of radio waves coming from far outside our Milky Way galaxy. Scientists believe FRBs emanate from powerful astrophysical phenomena billions of light years away.

Health - 09.01.2019
McGill University helps to inform understanding of cancer risk
McGill University has helped develop a global resource that includes data on thousands of inherited variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The BRCA Exchange was created through the BRCA Challenge, a long-term demonstration project initiated by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) to enhance sharing of BRCA1/BRCA2 data.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 09.01.2019
Achieving goals in the lab and on the pitch
Achieving goals in the lab and on the pitch
Senior Anthony Badea, a physics major and varsity soccer player, investigates the beginnings of the universe. Anthony Badea got hooked on physics during his senior of high school in Irvine, California. He used to fall asleep watching interviews and speeches by public figures in science like astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and string theorist Michio Kaku.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.01.2019
Citizen scientists help discover new exoplanet in ’habitable zone’
A new planet roughly twice the size of Earth has been discovered located within the "habitable zone"-the range of distances from a star where liquid water may exist on the planet's surface. A research team that included a UChicago graduate student confirmed the finding after volunteer citizens flagged a crucial piece of evidence in data from NASA's Kepler spacecraft.

Materials Science - 08.01.2019
Rare metals from e-waste
Rare metals from e-waste
This year, beautifully wrapped laptops, mobile phones or even new TV sets lay under numerous Christmas trees. They are enthusiastically put into use - and the old electronic devices are disposed of. The e-waste contains resources such as neodymium, indium and gold. What happens to the valuable materials' And how much rare metal is contained in mobile phones, computers and monitors that are still in use today? Empa researchers have investigated these questions.

Computer Science / Telecom - 08.01.2019
Imperial experts create robot helper to understand and respond to human movement
Researchers at Imperial have created a new robot controller using game theory, allowing the robot to learn when to assist a human. The past decade has seen robots work increasingly with humans - for example in manufacturing, assistive devices for physically impaired individuals, and in surgery. However, robots cannot currently react in a personalised way to individual users, which limits their usefulness to humans.