News 2019


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Results 61 - 80 of 2491.


Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.09.2019
Identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and published , discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories. For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence.

Earth Sciences - 16.09.2019
Geochemists measure new composition of Earth's mantle
Geochemists measure new composition of Earth’s mantle
Researchers suspect greater dynamics than previously assumed between the Earth's surface and its mantle / Study published in 'Nature Geoscience' What is the chemical composition of the Earth's interior? Because it is impossible to drill more than about ten kilometres deep into the Earth, volcanic rocks formed by melting Earth's deep interior often provide such information.

Social Sciences - Administration - 16.09.2019
Finds community-oriented policing improves attitudes toward police
Brief, friendly door-to-door visits by uniformed police officers substantially improve people's attitudes toward the police and increase their trust in law enforcement, according to a new study of community-oriented policing in New Haven. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first randomized, controlled field experiment to test the effects of community-oriented policing on people's opinions of their local police.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.09.2019
Once-common hysterectomy technique linked to worse uterine cancer outcomes
Every year, nearly 700,000 American women have surgery to remove their uterus (hysterectomy) or uterine fibroids (myomectomy). A laparoscopic surgical technique once commonly used in these procedures could be worsening the outcomes for women who have undiagnosed uterine cancer at the time of the procedure, reports a Yale-led study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Astronomy / Space Science - Music - 16.09.2019
Space Station science: learning from Luca
Space Station science: learning from Luca
There is plenty of science on the boil at the International Space Station - including an experiment literally designed to expand our knowledge of the boiling process. Get a glimpse into the experiments ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano has been working on over the past two weeks in this fortnightly spotlight on Space Station science.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 16.09.2019
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today . The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.09.2019
The stellar nurseries of distant galaxies
The stellar nurseries of distant galaxies
An international team headed by UNIGE has discovered that the properties of molecular clouds, and the number of stars they produce, are different depending on whether they are in distant or nearby galaxies. Star clusters are formed by the condensation of molecular clouds, masses of cold, dense gas that are found in every galaxy.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 16.09.2019
New results for the mass of neutrinos
New results for the mass of neutrinos
Apart from photons, the fundamental quanta of light, neutrinos are the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. As they possess a small non-zero mass, these “light-weights of the universe” play a key role in cosmology and particle physics. The most precise scale for neutrinos in the world is the international experiment "KATRIN" at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, in which scientists of the University of Münster are also involved.

Social Sciences - 16.09.2019
Some personality traits are a product of where we live, not who we are
Some personality traits are a product of where we live, not who we are
Qualities such as patience or risk-taking are often thought of as product of an individual's innate character. But a new Yale study of children from four countries suggests many behaviors may not be a product of who you are, but where you are. " We tend to think of qualities like patience as an innate part of who we are but virtually all of what we know about how these behaviors develop comes from children in industrialized societies," said Dorsa Amir , anthropologist and lead author of the Yale study published Sept.

Environment - 16.09.2019
Atlantic Ocean may get a jump start from the other side of the world
A key question for climate scientists in recent years has been whether the Atlantic Ocean's main circulation system is slowing down, a development that could have dramatic consequences for Europe and other parts of the Atlantic rim. But a new study suggests help may be on the way from an unexpected source - the Indian Ocean.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 16.09.2019
Breakthrough in harnessing the power of biological catalysts
The power of nature could soon be used to create day-to-day materials such as paints, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in a much more environmentally friendly way, thanks to a new breakthrough from scientists at Cardiff University. The international team, led by the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, has successfully unlocked the catalytic abilities of enzymes taken from fungi by creating the perfect conditions needed for them to function.

Transport - Business / Economics - 16.09.2019
Americans would rather drive themselves to work than have an autonomous vehicle drive them, study says
Americans would rather drive themselves to work than have an autonomous vehicle drive them, study says
Many Americans use a ride-hailing service - like Uber or Lyft - to get to and from work. It provides the privacy of riding in a personal car and the convenience of catching up on emails or social media during traffic jams. In the future, self-driving vehicles could provide the same service, except without a human driver.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 16.09.2019
KATRIN Cuts the Mass Estimate for the Elusive Neutrino in Half
KATRIN Cuts the Mass Estimate for the Elusive Neutrino in Half
Original release published by the University of Washington. An international team of scientists that includes researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant yet elusive elementary particles in our universe.

Chemistry - Environment - 16.09.2019
Catalyst opens way to sustainable fuels from carbon dioxide
Catalyst opens way to sustainable fuels from carbon dioxide
A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device. If the idea of flying on battery-powered commercial jets makes you nervous, you can relax a little. Researchers have discovered a practical starting point for converting carbon dioxide into sustainable liquid fuels, including fuels for heavier modes of transportation that may prove very difficult to electrify, like airplanes, ships and freight trains.

Pharmacology - Innovation / Technology - 16.09.2019
Drugs cannot escape the NarcoReader
The University of Antwerp is coordinating a European project to increase efficiency in drug detection With the NarcoReader, the University of Antwerp is collaborating with its international partners to develop a high-tech device that is intended to make the detection of drugs quite a bit more efficient.

Chemistry - Innovation / Technology - 16.09.2019
Measuring ethanol's deadly twin
Measuring ethanol’s deadly twin
ETH researchers have developed an inexpensive, handheld measuring device that can distinguish between methanol and potable alcohol. It offers a simple, quick method of detecting adulterated or contaminated alcoholic beverages and is able to diagnose methanol poisoning in exhaled breath. Methanol is sometimes referred to as ethanol's deadly twin.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 16.09.2019
KATRIN cuts the mass estimate for the elusive neutrino in half
KATRIN cuts the mass estimate for the elusive neutrino in half
An international team of scientists has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant, yet elusive, elementary particles in our universe. At the 2019 Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics conference in Toyama, Japan, leaders from the KATRIN experiment reported Sept.

Health - Mathematics - 16.09.2019
Jeanne Calment was indeed the oldest human being
Jeanne Calment was indeed the oldest human being
By combining epidemiology, mathematical modelling and historical investigation, researchers in Geneva, Switzerland and France confirm Jeanne Calment's exceptional longevity, invalidating the conspiracy theories surrounding her. Jeanne Calment, who passed away in 1997 at 122 years and 165 days, still is today the human being who had the longest life.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.09.2019
Childhood behaviour linked to taking paracetamol during pregnancy
A new study by the University of Bristol adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol during pregnancy. The research published today (Monday 16 September) in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology examined whether there were any effects of taking paracetamol in mid-pregnancy and the behaviour of the offspring between the ages of 6 month and 11 years, with memory and IQ tested up until the age of 17.

Physics - 16.09.2019
3Q: Scientists shave estimate of neutrino's mass in half
3Q: Scientists shave estimate of neutrino’s mass in half
Joseph Formaggio explains the discovery that the ghostly particle must be no more than 1 electronvolt, half as massive as previously thought. Prof. Joseph Formaggio speaks with Clara Moskowitz of Scientific American about how an international team of researchers (including MIT scientists) has found that a neutrino cannot weigh more than one electron volt.

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