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Results 61 - 80 of 1280.


Life Sciences - Environment - 14.05.2019
Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe. Bleaching occurs when the symbiotic relationship between coral and algae breaks down - corals under environmental stress disconnect from their algae partners, which means they lose their energy source.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 13.05.2019
Space Station science looking at Earth
Space Station science looking at Earth
13 May 2019 In this edition of our bi-weekly update on European research run on the International Space Station, we're taking our cue from the Living Planet Symposium - the largest conference on Earth Observation taking place this week in Milan, Italy - and focusing on our own planet. Marine traffic Many of the experiments that run on the International Space Station do not require astronaut intervention after the initial setup and periodic check-ups.

Pharmacology - 13.05.2019
Biomarker reveals PTSD sufferers at risk of suicide
The risk of suicide among individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is much higher than the general population, but identifying those individuals at greatest risk has been difficult. However, a team at Yale has discovered a biological marker linked to individuals with PTSD who are most likely to think about suicide, the researchers report May 13 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Health - Environment - 13.05.2019
Flu virus’ best friend: low humidity
Yale researchers have pinpointed a key reason why people are more likely to get sick and even die from flu during winter months: low humidity. While experts know that cold temperatures and low humidity promote transmission of the flu virus, less is understood about the effect of decreased humidity on the immune system's defenses against flu infection.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.05.2019
Extreme cold could reveal herpesvirus infection dynamics
Extreme cold could reveal herpesvirus infection dynamics
Researchers don't know much about how viruses like those that cause chicken pox infect cells. A super-cold form of electron microscopy could change that, potentially paving the way for new treatments and vaccines. The funny thing about the virus that causes chicken pox is that no one knows for sure how it or many of its herpesvirus cousins invade and infect cells.

Environment - 13.05.2019
Joining forces on Earth science to benefit society
Joining forces on Earth science to benefit society
13 May 2019 With human activity leaving its indelible mark on the landscape and affecting the climate, our natural world is changing faster than at any other time in history. Science is fundamental to understanding environmental change so that these huge challenges can be tackled. To ensure a more efficient approach on Earth-system science and to bring direct benefits to society, ESA and the European Commission are working to join forces.

Pedagogy - 13.05.2019
What happens when your picky toddler becomes a teen?
Toddlers who are picky about their food are not deficient in essential nutrients compared to their peers when they are teenagers. However, the few children who were persistent picky eaters, those who were less able to change and adapt their eating habits, showed pronounced differences in food intake at the age of 13, including a higher intake of sugar, according to new research published in Nutrition.

Health - 13.05.2019
For-profit dialysis provider charges private insurers four times more than government payers
FINDINGS Private insurers covering people receiving treatment for dialysis paid four times more than government insurance programs such as Medicare paid for the same service. The study found that government programs paid, on average, $248 per dialysis session, compared with $1,041 per session for people with private insurance.

Environment - 13.05.2019
Green Energy Nudges Come With a Hidden Cost
All across the United States, many households receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy. At most companies, employees are automatically enrolled in 401(k) plans unless they choose to opt-out, helping employees easily save for retirement. Such policies aim to "nudge" people toward making better choices, both for their future selves and for others.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 13.05.2019
Concludes Glassy Menagerie of Particles in Beach Sands Near Hiroshima is Fallout Debris from A-Bomb Blast
Concludes Glassy Menagerie of Particles in Beach Sands Near Hiroshima is Fallout Debris from A-Bomb Blast
Mario Wannier, a career geologist with expertise in studying tiny marine life, was methodically sorting through particles in samples of beach sand from Japan's Motoujina Peninsula when he spotted something unexpected: a number of tiny, glassy spheres and other unusual objects. Wannier, who is now retired, had been comparing biological debris in beach sands from different areas in an effort to gauge the health of local and regional marine ecosystems.

Pharmacology - Health - 13.05.2019
Researchers identify faster, more effective drug combination regimens to treat tuberculosis
Tuberculosis is a potentially deadly though curable disease. Each year about 10 million people develop active cases, and 1.6 million people die. In addition, about 1.7 billion people around the world are infected with TB bacteria, which can lie dormant for weeks to years, then become active and cause disease in up to 10 percent of those who are infected.

Environment - Materials Science - 13.05.2019
Microplastics in freshwaters
Microplastics in freshwaters
Sea birds dying in agony with a belly full of plastic garbage; plastic accumulations as big as islands: Virtually everyone has seen pictures like these today. But there are also plastic particles that are barely visible to the eye - microplastics. The danger posed by these tiny particles has hardly been researched to date.

Health - Environment - 13.05.2019
Daily doses of vitamin D are unreachable during Swiss winter
A study funded by the SNSF shows that in winter, weak sunlight prevents the Swiss population from producing sufficient levels of vitamin D. Too much sun increases the risk of skin cancer. But moderate exposure is required to produce vitamin D. This substance is essential for bone health and may also play a role in preventing respiratory infections, autoimmune diseases and certain types of cancer.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 13.05.2019
How Venus and Mars can teach us about Earth
How Venus and Mars can teach us about Earth
13 May 2019 One has a thick poisonous atmosphere, one has hardly any atmosphere at all, and one is just right for life to flourish - but it wasn't always that way. The atmospheres of our two neighbours Venus and Mars can teach us a lot about the past and future scenarios for our own planet. Rewind 4.6 billion years from the present day to the planetary construction yard, and we see that all the planets share a common history: they were all born from the same swirling cloud of gas and dust, with the newborn Sun ignited at the centre.

Health - 13.05.2019
Common food additive found to affect gut microbiota
Experts call for better regulation of a common additive in foods and medicine, as research reveals it can impact the gut microbiota and could lead to inflammatory bowel diseases or colorectal cancer. University of Sydney research provides new evidence that nanoparticles, which are present in many food items, may have a substantial and harmful influence on human health.

Health - 13.05.2019
Pre-drinking not just for the young
Instead of slowing down, New Zealanders appear to increase their pre-drinking after the age of 30, a University of Queensland study has found. Researchers explored the international pre-drinking habits of a convenient sample of respondents from 27 countries to determine the role of sex and age on the behaviour.

Life Sciences - Environment - 13.05.2019
Discovery unleashes growth in salty soils
Discovery unleashes growth in salty soils
A hormone produced by stressed plants could combat damage caused by salty soils, considerably increasing plant growth. A team of researchers from The University of Queensland and Western Sydney University has identified a naturally-occurring chemical in plants - known as 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, or ACC - that reduces the symptoms of salt stress when applied to soil.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.05.2019
Chemists take a closer look at the spot where water meets air
Chemists take a closer look at the spot where water meets air
Water, despite its central place in so many processes vital to life on Earth, remains a chemical mystery in many respects. One of those mysteries is the nature of water at the exact point where it comes into contact with air. A study published April 18 by researchers at Yale University and the University of Washington offers a new level of observation and analysis.

Innovation / Technology - 10.05.2019
Public’s Dread of Nuclear Power Limits its Deployment
In the ongoing effort to decarbonize U.S. energy production, one energy source often attracts great controversy. Nuclear power has been a part of the American energy portfolio since the 1950s and generates one in every five kilowatt-hours of electricity produced in the country. Still, for a number of reasons, including the association between radiation and cancer, the general public has long felt a significant dread about it.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.05.2019
Remarkable fish see colour in deep, dark water
Remarkable fish see colour in deep, dark water
Fish living up to 1500 metres below the surface have developed surprisingly diverse vision that could help them determine predator from prey in the dimly-lit depths of their fish-eats-fish world. An international research team involving University of Queensland scientists believes the deep-sea discovery that fish could see colour in the dark shines new light on the evolution of vision in vertebrates, including humans.