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Results 81 - 100 of 784.


Social Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
Bristol provides first long-term look at predictors of suicide attempts
Bristol provides first long-term look at predictors of suicide attempts
Academics at the University of Bristol have taken the first long-term look at potential factors that could lead to suicide attempts in high-risk young people. Published in The Lancet Psychiatry today (Thursday 14 March) researchers examined questionnaire data from 16 and 21 year olds who are part of Bristol's Children of the 90s study, concentrating on those who'd thought about suicide.

Linguistics / Literature - 14.03.2019
Diet-Induced Changes Favor Innovation in Speech Sounds
Diet-Induced Changes Favor Innovation in Speech Sounds
Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as "f" in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers at the University of Zurich has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history.

Environment - 14.03.2019
Sweet Baby Rays
Alumnus uncovers first-known manta ray nursery Gliding through the water with the slow hypnotic beat of their fins, the otherworldly manta rays are a perfect combination of size and grace. These plankton-eating marvels can reach up to 23 feet in wingspan as adults. Yet despite being so conspicuous, these gentle giants are notoriously hard to access and study, so major knowledge gaps remain in their basic biology, ecology and life history.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
Novel YSPH framework helps identify genes associated with disease
A powerful analytical tool, known as UTMOST, developed by Hongyu Zhao, Ph.D., the Ira V. Hiscock Professor of Biostatistics at the Yale School of Public Health, and colleagues could allow researchers to design therapeutic drugs that more effectively combat disease. Zhao explained the framework's purpose and potential in identifying genetic associations to disease in a recent interview.

Physics - 14.03.2019
Sea Quark Surprise Reveals Deeper Complexity in Proton Spin Puzzle
Sea Quark Surprise Reveals Deeper Complexity in Proton Spin Puzzle
Berkeley Lab researchers contribute to new results from STAR experiment that show antiquarks' contribution to proton spin depends on 'flavor' Note: This press release is adapted from a release produced by Brookhaven National Laboratory. View the original release. New data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) add detail - and complexity - to an intriguing puzzle that scientists have been seeking to solve: how the building blocks that make up a proton contribute to its spin.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
New approach to stroke treatment could minimize brain damage
A new treatment for a common type of stroke may soon be possible, thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers. In a study published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine , researchers successfully used a new approach that significantly minimized brain damage caused by stroke in mouse models.

Business / Economics - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.03.2019
Managers in global supply chains need to do more to tackle modern slavery
More needs to be done to tackle modern slavery in supply chains in Brazil - one of the world's biggest suppliers of beef and an important source of timber. Whilst some businesses in Brazil are already putting measures in place to tackle modern slavery in their supply chains, there is a lack of consistency in approach, action is voluntary, and initiatives are frequently limited to specific communities or locations, according to new research.

Physics - Music - 14.03.2019
Exotic
Exotic "second sound" phenomenon observed in pencil lead
At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports. The next time you set a kettle to boil, consider this scenario: After turning the burner off, instead of staying hot and slowly warming the surrounding kitchen and stove, the kettle quickly cools to room temperature and its heat hurtles away in the form of a boiling-hot wave.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 14.03.2019
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth’s ice ages
Major tectonic collisions near the equator have caused three ice ages in the last 540 million years. Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages - periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps.

Environment - 14.03.2019
What ancient poop reveals about the rise and fall of civilizations
What ancient poop reveals about the rise and fall of civilizations
The pre-Columbian city of Cahokia was once among the most populous and bustling settlements north of Mexico. Nestled along the Mississippi River in what is now southern Illinois, its tens of thousands of inhabitants fished, farmed, traded and thrived. But by 1400 A.D., Cahokia's population had dwindled to virtually nothing.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
New cause for concern over weedkiller glyphosate
New research from McGill University reveals an overlooked impact that the widely used herbicide glyphosate may be having on the environment. First commercialized by Monsanto under the name Roundup, glyphosate has come under scrutiny in the past, mostly in relation to its potential toxicity. This new research, published recently in the Ecological Society of America's Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, focuses not on direct health risks associated with the herbicide, but on its contribution to environmental phosphorus levels, an issue that has yet to receive much attention.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
Uncovering Uncultivated Microbes in the Human Gut
Uncovering Uncultivated Microbes in the Human Gut
A tree's growth is dependent on nutrients from the soil and water, as well as the microbes in, on, and around the roots. Similarly, a human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles.

Computer Science / Telecom - 14.03.2019
Handling trillions of supercomputer files just got simpler
Handling trillions of supercomputer files just got simpler
Exascale file system Delta FS breaks the "the metadata bottleneck" by handling extreme numbers of files and amounts of data with unprecedented performance Gary Grider, left, and Brad Settlemyer discuss the new Los Alamos and Carnegie Mellon software product, DeltaFS, released to the software distribution site GitHub this week.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 14.03.2019
Thanking and Apologizing: Talk That Isn’t Cheap
We place a high value on teaching children to say "thank you" and "I'm sorry." As adults, these simple words are central to many social interactions.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.03.2019
A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target
A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target
Study suggests an alternative way to treat tumors that are dependent on the cancer-promoting Myc protein. One of the most common cancer-promoting genes, known as Myc, is also one of the most difficult to target with drugs. Scientists have long tried to develop drugs that block the Myc protein, but so far their efforts have not been successful.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer's symptoms
Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer’s symptoms
Noninvasive treatment improves memory and reduces amyloid plaques in mice. By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients. This noninvasive treatment, which works by inducing brain waves known as gamma oscillations, also greatly reduced the number of amyloid plaques found in the brains of these mice.

Innovation / Technology - Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
Two EPFL spin-offs reach the finals of an international competition
Two EPFL spin-offs reach the finals of an international competition
EPFL spinoffs Lumendo and Gliapharm are among 80 deep-tech startups from around the world that have qualified for the finals of the Hello Tomorrow Challenge in Paris tomorrow. The finalists will pitch their company to a jury of technology specialists and investors. In addition to vying for cash prizes, the startups are gaining valuable visibility.

Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
Research leads to new discoveries about the Mary Rose
A Cardiff University archaeologist has revealed new insights into the origins of the crew on board the Mary Rose, the flagship of Henry VIII's navy. The scientific findings of Dr Richard Madgwick, Lecturer in Archaeological Science, suggest that crew members on the Tudor warship, which sank in 1545, may have come from as far away as southern Europe and perhaps even Africa.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.03.2019
Keeping track of fragrances
Keeping track of fragrances
Fragrances are added in a wide variety of consumer products - cosmetics, detergents, cleaning agents, and air fresheners. If incompletely eliminated in wastewater treatment plants, they can end up in rivers and lakes. Companies are therefore required to perform an environmental risk assessment before fragrance compounds are used in final products.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.03.2019
How marine snow cools the planet
How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers in the School of Geosciences have mapped out how carbonate formations have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Adriana Dutkiewicz warns global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. University of Sydney scientists have modelled how carbonate accumulation from 'marine snow' in oceans has absorbed carbon dioxide over millennia and been a key driver in keeping the planet cool for millions of years.