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Results 81 - 100 of 3025.


Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 01.11.2019
Gannets learn to hunt by following their elders
Gannets, the largest seabirds in the North Atlantic, can travel hundreds of miles from their homes just to catch food for their chicks. However, with around a million square miles of ocean to choose from, it has always been a mystery how they decide where is best to search for fish. Now, new research led by the University of Glasgow and published today in the Journal of Avian Biology, offers new insights into why these iconic shaped seabirds choose to hunt the way they do.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 01.11.2019
Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios
Research combining future climate conditions and arsenic-induced soil stresses predicts rice yields could decline about 40 percent by 2100, a loss that would impact about 2 billion people dependent on the global crop. Rice is the largest global staple crop, consumed by more than half the world's population - but new experiments from Stanford University suggest that with climate change, production in major rice-growing regions with endemic soil arsenic will undergo a dramatic decline and jeopardize critical food supplies.

Pharmacology - Health - 01.11.2019
New direction for treatment of aggressive type of breast cancer
Researchers identify path to improve HER2+ breast cancer susceptibility to approved therapies Approximately 15 to 20% of breast cancers are caused by changes in a gene known as HER2, which cause the protein produced by the gene to become constantly active, leading to uncontrolled cell growth. Cancers with these genetic changes are called "HER2-positive" or "HER2+" breast cancers.

Pharmacology - Health - 31.10.2019
Checkpoint inhibitor prolongs survival in pa
The checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) increases the survival time of patients with advanced head and neck cancers, according to a new global study led by Yale Cancer Center (YCC). The data was published today in the journal The Lancet. The findings of the phase 3 study show that, compared to the standard therapy, overall survival was significantly improved for participants with previously untreated recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancers.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.10.2019
Measles causes 'immune amnesia' leaving us vulnerable to other diseases
Measles causes ’immune amnesia’ leaving us vulnerable to other diseases
Scientists have shown how measles causes long-term damage to the immune system, leaving people vulnerable to other infections. The international team, which includes the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Amsterdam and Imperial College London, revealed that the measles virus deletes part of the immune system's memory, removing previously existing immunity to other infections, in both humans and ferrets.

Pharmacology - 31.10.2019
Many take anticoagulants and OTC supplements, which poses risk
FINDINGS Nearly 98% percent of people prescribed direct-acting oral anticoagulants such as apixaban also used over-the-counter products. Of those, 33% took at least one such product that, in combination with the anticoagulants, could cause dangerous internal bleeding. People taking these medications largely lacked knowledge of some potentially serious interactions.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Cytoplasm of scrambled frog eggs organizes into cell-like structures
The cytoplasm of ruptured frog eggs can self-organize into cell-like compartments that retain the ability to undergo divisions. Can scrambled eggs unscramble themselves' Well, sort of. The cytoplasm of ruptured Xenopus frog eggs spontaneously reorganizes into cell-like compartments, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Social Sciences - Politics - 31.10.2019
Hindu kids more apt to echo propaganda that ’Indian equals Hindu’
Muslim and Hindu students at Zenith School in Vadodara in India. (Photo courtesy of Mahesh Srinivasan) With a multi-faith population of some 1.3 billion, India claims to be the world's largest secular democracy. But when it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, the country's Hindu children are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from UC Berkeley.

Physics - Materials Science - 31.10.2019
New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells
New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells
People can be good at hiding strain, and we're not alone. Solar cells have the same talent. For a solar cell, physical strain within its microscopic crystalline structure can interrupt its core function - converting sunlight into electricity - by essentially "losing” energy as heat. For an emerging type of solar cell, known as lead halide perovskites, reducing and taming this loss is key to improving efficiency and putting the perovskites on par with today's silicon solar cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Cognitive differences linked to amyloid at age 70
Cognitive differences linked to amyloid at age 70
People with more harmful amyloid plaques in the brain already score worse than their peers on cognitive tests at age 70, finds a new UCL-led study. Amyloid plaques are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, which typically develops multiple years later, so the new findings, published in Neurology , might show early warning signs before any disease develops.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.10.2019
Removing liver tumors safely, noninvasively and efficiently
Removing liver tumors safely, noninvasively and efficiently
Many liver tumors have long been difficult or impossible to remove. Since 2015, however, it has been possible to treat these tumors by combining noninvasive surgical techniques, radiological imaging and a navigation system. For the first time, a new study by University of Bern and Inselspital, Berne University Hospital has impressively demonstrated the success of this technique.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Milk from Teeth: Dental Stem Cells Can Generate Milk-Producing Cells
Milk from Teeth: Dental Stem Cells Can Generate Milk-Producing Cells
Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Analyzing gut bacteria more accurately
The microorganisms in our intestines could be linked to certain diseases such as Alzheimer's and diabetes. Researchers from the AD-gut consortium have developed a novel method - combining optical DNA mapping and statistics - for accurately distinguishing and rapidly identifying the various species in the microbiota.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.10.2019
Dark Matter Day Q&A with Berkeley Lab Physicist Quentin Riffard
Dark Matter Day Q&A with Berkeley Lab Physicist Quentin Riffard
Quentin Riffard, a project scientist for the LUX-ZEPLIN dark matter detection experiment that is now being installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, shares his experiences in researching dark matter in this Q&A. Today is Dark Matter Day , which is recognized by the Interactions collaboration, an international particle physics communications group.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
With a new Artificial Intelligence method, humans and machines can analyse complex biomedical data
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the USI Institute of Computational Sciences (ICS), and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB), affiliated to USI, have developed a new Artificial Intelligence method that enables the analysis of complex biomedical data. The results of the research have been published in the renowned scientific journal Science advances .

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2019
Analyzing gut bacteria more accurately to make diagnosis
The microorganisms in our intestines could be linked to certain diseases such as Alzheimer's and diabetes. Researchers from the AD-gut consortium have developed a novel method - combining optical DNA mapping and statistics - for accurately distinguishing and rapidly identifying the various species in the microbiota.

Pharmacology - Health - 31.10.2019
Checkpoint inhibitor prolongs survival with certain head and neck cancers
The checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) increases the survival time of patients with advanced head and neck cancers, according to a new global study led by Yale Cancer Center (YCC). The data was published today in the journal The Lancet. The findings of the phase 3 study show that, compared to the standard therapy, overall survival was significantly improved for participants with previously untreated recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancers.

Environment - 30.10.2019
Intact forest loss ’six times worse’ for climate
The impact of losing intact tropical forests is more devastating on the climate than previously thought, according to University of Queensland-led research. The international study has revealed between 2000 and 2013 the clearance of intact tropical forests resulted in a much higher level of carbon being emitted to the atmosphere than first believed - resulting in a 626 per cent increase in the calculated impact on climate.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 30.10.2019
Climate models and geology reveal new insights into the East Asian monsoon
Climate models and geology reveal new insights into the East Asian monsoon
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have used climate models and geological records to better understand changes in the East Asian monsoon over long geologic time scales. Their findings, published today in the journal Science Advances , suggest that the monsoon system's development was more sensitive to changes in geography (especially mountain height) rather than carbon dioxide, and that the monsoon came into existence around 40 million years earlier than previously thought.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.10.2019
Insect decline more extensive than suspected
Insect decline more extensive than suspected
Compared to a decade ago, today the number of insect species on many areas has decreased by about one third. This is the result of a survey of an international research team led by scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The loss of species mainly affects grasslands in the vicinity of intensively farmed land - but also applies to forests and protected areas.

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