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Results 81 - 100 of 1280.


Life Sciences - 10.05.2019
Dietary fats entering the brain may explain link between obesity and depression
Obesity and depression have long been linked, with previous clinical studies finding an association between these two conditions. However, until now, the mechanisms of how obesity affects depression and vice versa have not been fully understood. Now, in a new study led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Gladstone Institutes, and published today in Translational Psychiatry , scientists have been able to demonstrate the links between the consumption of diets high in saturated fats that lead to obesity and the development of depression phenotypes.

Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Back to the sources of neural diversity
Back to the sources of neural diversity
By deciphering the genetic programmes of neurons of the cerebral cortex, Swiss and Belgian researchers unravel the mechanisms controlling the genesis of cells in one of the most essential parts of our brain. The cortex is a complex brain region that allows us to perceive the world and interact with objects and beings around us.

Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
New type of highly sensitive vision discovered in deep-sea fish
New type of highly sensitive vision discovered in deep-sea fish
The deep sea is home to fish species that can detect various wavelengths of light in near-total darkness. Unlike other vertebrates, they have several genes for the light-sensitive photopigment rhodopsin, which likely enables these fish to detect bioluminescent signals from light-emitting organs. The findings were published by an international team of researchers led by evolutionary biologists from the University of Basel.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Cancer cells can communicate over longer distances within the body
Cancer cells can communicate over longer distances within the body
EPFL researchers have discovered that cancer cells use exosomes to communicate with each other and send information through the bloodstream. This breakthrough opens up new possibilities for the use of cancer immunotherapy techniques. "It was a huge surprise, we didn't expect to find so many melanoma cancer cell markers in blood exosomes," explains Hubert Girault, who heads up the Laboratory of Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry at EPFL Valais Wallis.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.05.2019
Smart design could prevent drug resistance in new malaria treatments
Smart design could prevent drug resistance in new malaria treatments
Researchers have overcome malaria parasites' resistance to potential new drugs by studying how it evolves. In a paper published today in Cell Chemical Biology , scientists from the Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College London studied malaria parasites resistant to a promising new class of candidate antimalarial drugs.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 09.05.2019
Building-integrated photovoltaics: aesthetic, efficient and widely accepted
Building-integrated photovoltaics: aesthetic, efficient and widely accepted
Within the scope of National Research Programme "Energy Turnaround" (NRP 70), researchers studied photovoltaic systems integrated into the roofs and façades (BIPV) of existing buildings from the point of view of aesthetic, ecological and economic criteria. Their findings: all developers and architects could use this technology for the renovation of existing buildings.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.05.2019
Stem cell scientists clear another hurdle in creating transplant arteries
Jue Zhang, lead author on the paper published in Stem Cell Reports, discusses cell images with Matt Brown, a coauthor on the paper and former postdoctoral researcher at the Morgridge Institute. Morgridge Institute for Research Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death worldwide, and treating it isn't easy.  The disease wreaks havoc on patients' blood vessels and can require complex bypass surgery.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.05.2019
New professor brings precision data to the dairy barn
Joao Dorea, faculty member in the UW-Madison Department of Dairy Science, explains to colleague Victor Cabrera results he observed using an automated computer vision system that was developed to monitor the behavior of dairy calves. Photo by Ted Halbach/UW-Madison Department of Dairy Science The same technology that alerts a self-driving car that there's a pedestrian in the crosswalk could also warn a dairy farmer that a calf is getting sick-even if that calf is mingled among dozens of healthy ones.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 09.05.2019
Rare-Earth metals in the atmosphere of a glowing-hot exoplanet
KELT-9 b is the hottest exoplanet known to date. In the summer of 2018, a joint team of astronomers from the universities of Bern and Geneva found signatures of gaseous iron and titanium in its atmosphere. Now these researchers have also been able to detect traces of vaporized sodium, magnesium, chromium, and the rare-Earth metals scandium and yttrium.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study. Predicting a species' sensitivity to environmental changes, such as deforestation or climate change, is crucial for designing conservation strategies. These predictions are often based on a species' physical traits, and assume that all members of a species will respond the same.

Pedagogy - 09.05.2019
Zweisprachige Kinder zeigen feineres Gespür für Gesprächspartner
Bilingual children adapt to the needs of their communication partners better than monolingual children. According to researchers at the University of Zurich, this is because children growing up bilingually have to manage challenging communication situations more often and deal with the differing communication styles of their parents.

Materials Science - Innovation / Technology - 09.05.2019
Design meets research
Design meets research
In the planned project "Re-FREAM" designers develop new and innovative fashion concepts in cooperation with researchers from all over Europe and completely rethink processes, traditions, production methods as well as design and functionality of clothing. Empa is also involved as a research partner. "We live in the most exciting era of mankind", write the initiators of the "Re-FREAM" project on their website.

Physics - 09.05.2019
Computing faster with quasi-particles
Computing faster with quasi-particles
In collaboration with researchers from Harvard University, researchers from the University of Würzburg have made an important step on the road to topological quantum computers. Now, they present their findings in the renowned scientific journal Nature. Majorana particles are very peculiar members of the family of elementary particles.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 09.05.2019
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
A new network of the world's leading Biofoundries has been launched to drive forward synthetic biology research and industry. The Global Alliance of Biofoundries (GBA) brings together 16 institutions from countries including the UK, US, Japan, Singapore, China, Australia, Denmark and Canada. The London DNA Foundry , based at Imperial College London, is one of the leading founders of the new Global Alliance.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.05.2019
Researchers take a step towards light-based, brain-like computing chip
Researchers take a step towards light-based, brain-like computing chip
New light-based hardware which can store and process information in a similar way to the human brain / Study published in "Nature" journal A technology that functions like a brain? In these times of artificial intelligence, this no longer seems so far-fetched - for example, when a mobile phone can recognise faces or languages.

Agronomy / Food Science - 08.05.2019
Obesity rising faster in rural areas than cities
Obesity rising faster in rural areas than cities
Obesity is increasing more rapidly in the world's rural areas than in cities, according to a new study of global trends in body-mass index (BMI). The research analysed the height and weight data of more than 112 million adults across urban and rural areas of 200 countries and territories between 1985 and 2017.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 08.05.2019
Knowledge for Growth 2019
5 Flemish universities reveal innovative state-of-the-art biotech research No less than 25 technologies in drug screening, therapy development, MedTech, digital health and AI will be showcased or pitched by the five Flemish universities at Europe's leading life sciences conference in Ghent.

Palaeontology - Mathematics - 08.05.2019
Challenges claim that 2-million-year-old fossil is human ancestor
Statistical analysis of fossil data shows that it is unlikely that Australopithecus sediba , a nearly two-million-year-old, apelike fossil from South Africa, is the direct ancestor of Homo , the genus to which modern-day humans belong. The research by paleontologists from the University of Chicago , published this week in Science Advances , concludes by suggesting that Australopithecus afarensis , of the famous "Lucy" skeleton, is still the most likely ancestor to the genus Homo .

Life Sciences - Health - 08.05.2019
Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression
New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.05.2019
’Bad guy’ fibrocytes could help rebuild damaged tissue
Could a blood cell type responsible for scarring and diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis be repurposed to help engineer healthy tissue? A new study by a University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health researcher shows that someday, fibrocytes may be used for regenerative therapies for people who need to have their vocal folds or other tissues rebuilt after damage or loss.