News 2019


Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 81 - 100 of 2491.


Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2019
No limits for UQ’s Tall Poppies
Developing diagnostic tests for ovarian cancer and finding better treatments for schizophrenia are among the pursuits of five University of Queensland researchers honoured in the 2019 Young Tall Poppy Science Awards. The annual awards - presented on Friday (September 13) - recognise outstanding young scientists demonstrating excellence in both research and science communication.

Music - Life Sciences - 13.09.2019
Reveals the role of childhood vision behind associations between shapes and sounds
Reveals the role of childhood vision behind associations between shapes and sounds
How do our senses, like vision, hearing, and touch, work together to create the perception of the world around us' A new study by scientists at Universitšt Hamburg finds that commonly found associations between shapes and sounds might rely on childhood vision. The results were published in the journal Psychological Science.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.09.2019
Summit to tackle tricky problems of aging and dementia
The second annual Aging, Research, and Technology Innovation Summit on Tuesday will gather researchers, entrepreneurs, policymakers, and health care workers to address some of the biggest challenges posed by neurodegenerative diseases. (UC Berkeley photo by Malachi Tran) Human life expectancy has more than doubled over the last century, and this sudden leap in longevity is triggering major shifts in our politics, economy and society - not to mention our personal health.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 13.09.2019
MRI-guided biopsy best for determining future risk of prostate cancer
E very year, tens thousands of men in the United States are diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer. Most are told that they don't need treatment other than “active surveillance” to monitor their slow-growing tumors. Now, UCLA physicians have shown that the best way to proceed with this is by starting out with an MRI-guided prostate biopsy.

Social Sciences - 13.09.2019
Most Britons think EU immigration rules would provide "enough control"
Most British adults, including a majority of Leave voters, think existing EU rules would provide "enough control" over EU immigration, according to a UCL and University of Cambridge survey conducted by YouGov. Crucially, the survey revealed that few people are aware of restrictions the UK could enforce under existing EU free movement regulations.

Psychology - 13.09.2019
Emotional rape victims seen as more believable
Distressed rape complainants are perceived to be more credible than those who control their emotions, a University of Queensland study has found. UQ School of Psychology PhD candidate Faye Nitschke said the findings were alarming, given that emotion is not related to honesty or accuracy. “On average, only nine per cent of rape allegations made to police in Australia, the United States and Europe proceed to trial,” Ms Nitschke said.

Social Sciences - 13.09.2019
Asset ownership key to understanding class in the 21st Century
Asset ownership key to understanding class in the 21st Century
With wealth inequality in Australia showing no sign of slowing, it is now a person's assets - rather than their employment status - that operates as the key decider and distributor of their life chances, argue University of Sydney researchers in a new paper. Social scientists Professor Lisa Adkins , Associate Professor Melinda Cooper and Professor Martijn Konings have spent the past 18 months researching the relationship between asset ownership and new forms of inequality , as part of the University of Sydney's flagship FutureFix arts and social sciences research.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.09.2019
Yearly snapshot of Saturn helps astronomers monitor the ringed world
Yearly snapshot of Saturn helps astronomers monitor the ringed world
The Hubble Space Telescope's annual snapshot of Saturn reveals a turbulent, dynamic atmosphere with small storms popping into view as others disappear, all framed by the planet's bright, icy rings. Analyzed by Mike Wong of UC Berkeley and Amy Simon of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Hubble portrait is part of a yearly campaign to record the giant planets in the solar system - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune - to track shifting weather patterns and discover new phenomena.

Electroengineering - Environment - 12.09.2019
Low-cost device generates electricity using natural cooling phenomenon
When frost forms on the ground overnight even when temperatures are well above freezing, or water droplets appear on car windshields even on a clear night, the cause is often a phenomenon called radiative sky cooling. In a paper published in the journal Joule, researchers led by a UCLA materials scientist report that they have leveraged the principles behind radiative sky cooling to develop an innovative way to produce renewable energy at night.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.09.2019
Interstellar 2.0
Interstellar 2.0
Astronomers have spotted an object that looks likely to be a very rare visitor from outside our Solar System. If confirmed, this unusual body would be only the second interstellar object ever detected passing through our neighbourhood. Like the fascinating cigar-shaped 'Oumuamua , which flew by in 2017, this bright object is also a comet, yet it cuts a very different shape in the sky.

Pharmacology - Health - 12.09.2019
Antibiotics reduce survival rates in cancer patients taking immunotherapy
Antibiotics reduce survival rates in cancer patients taking immunotherapy
Cancer patients on immunotherapy fare worse if they have recently taken antibiotics, with their response and overall survival rate 'crashing'. The findings come from a study of almost 200 cancer patients in the UK taking a type of immunotherapy called checkpoint inhibitors, part of the standard treatment pathway for cancer patients on the NHS.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.09.2019
Bone marrow may be the missing piece of the fertility puzzle
A woman's bone marrow may determine her ability to start and sustain a pregnancy, report Yale researchers in PLOS Biology. The study shows that when an egg is fertilized, stem cells leave the bone marrow and travel via the bloodstream to the uterus, where they help transform the uterine lining for implantation.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.09.2019
Statins could protect older patients from severe pneumonia
Statins could be used to treat older patients admitted to hospital with a severe type of pneumonia, researchers at the University of Birmingham have found. A clinical trial, led by the University of Birmingham's Institute of Inflammation and Ageing , set out to determine if giving a high dose of a statin called simvastatin over a short period would improve immune system function for older adults who had been hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia with sepsis.

Computer Science / Telecom - 12.09.2019
First Earth observation satellite with AI ready for launch
First Earth observation satellite with AI ready for launch
A few months from now will see the launch of the first European satellite to demonstrate how onboard artificial intelligence can improve the efficiency of sending Earth observation data back to Earth. Dubbed -Sat, or PhiSat, this revolutionary artificial intelligence technology will fly on one of the two CubeSats that make up the FSSCat mission - a Copernicus Masters winning idea.

Health - 12.09.2019
A high-precision instrument for ophthalmologists
A high-precision instrument for ophthalmologists
EPFL scientists have helped develop a microscopic glass device that doctors could use to inject medicine into retinal veins with unprecedented accuracy. Their instrument meets an important need in eye surgery, delivering exceptional stability and precision. A team of researchers presented a breakthrough device for eye surgery at EPFL Neuch‚tel's Research Day on 11 September.

Pharmacology - Physics - 12.09.2019
A Single Dose for Good Measure: How an Anti-Nuclear-Contamination Pill Could Also Help MRI Patients
A Single Dose for Good Measure: How an Anti-Nuclear-Contamination Pill Could Also Help MRI Patients
Same pill designed to treat radiation poisoning could double as an anti-gadolinium-toxicity pill for MRI patients injected with commonly used contrast dye, says Berkeley Lab chemist W hen chemist Rebecca Abergel and her team at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) successfully developed an anti-radiation-poisoning pill in 2014 , they hoped it would never have to be used.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.09.2019
Type 2 diabetes is not just about insulin
Type 2 diabetes is not just about insulin
By showing that the liver can produce glucose autonomously, researchers at UNIGE explain how type 2 diabetes can develop in overweight people even without insulin resistance. In Switzerland, more than 400,000 people suffer from type 2 diabetes, a serious metabolic disorder that is constantly increasing.

Environment - Microtechnics - 12.09.2019
"Flying fish" robot can dive and fly
A bio-inspired bot uses water from the environment to create a propelling gas and launch itself from the water's surface. The robot had been developed by researchers at Imperial College London. It can travel 26 meters through the air after take-off and could be used to collect water samples in hazardous and cluttered environments, such as during flooding or when monitoring ocean pollution, report the team lead by Mirko Kovac, who also heads the joint "Materials and Technology Center of Robotics" at Empa, in the latest issue of "Science Robotics".

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.09.2019
Gloomy forecast for the Aletsch Glacier
Gloomy forecast for the Aletsch Glacier
The largest glacier in the Alps is visibly suffering the effects of global warming. ETH researchers have now calculated how much of the Aletsch Glacier will still be visible by the end of the century. In the worst-case scenario, a couple patches of ice will be all that's left. Every year, it attracts thousands of visitors from around the world: as the largest ice flow in the Alps, the Great Aletsch Glacier is a major tourism draw in the Swiss region of Upper Valais, second only to the Matterhorn.

Pharmacology - 12.09.2019
Casts doubt on accuracy of mobile drug testing devices
Casts doubt on accuracy of mobile drug testing devices
Research at the University of Sydney Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics suggests the devices currently used return both false positives and false negatives. New research conducted by the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics at the University of Sydney calls into question the reliability of the two devices that are currently being used for mobile drug testing (MDT) in NSW and other Australian states.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |