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Results 81 - 100 of 1805.


Life Sciences - Health - 10.07.2019
The battle between virus and host cell
The battle between virus and host cell
Würzburg Scientists have precisely followed the activity of thousands of genes in individual cells for hours. For the first time, they were able to show why some cells are successfully infected by viruses, whereas others are not. When viruses enter our bodies - such as during an influenza or a gastrointestinal infection - the processes within the infected cells change: In the worst case, the virus takes the helm and reprograms the cell to its advantage.

Physics - 10.07.2019
Physics Professor’s Research Sheds Light on the Mass of Sound
Most of us normally think that sound travels through the air without shape or substance. A recent study building on research conducted by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Physics Riccardo Penco has shown that sound waves actually have a small amount of mass that is in a possibly exotic form.

Health - 09.07.2019
Changes in Mosquito Behaviour Could Result in Millions of Additional Malaria Cases
Changes in Mosquito Behaviour Could Result in Millions of Additional Malaria Cases
Bed nets and indoor residual spraying with insecticides are key interventions to protect people in their homes from mosquito bites, thereby preventing malaria transmission. A remaining challenge is the transmission that occurs outdoors. A new study found that the proportion of outdoor mosquito bites in sub-Saharan Africa has increased.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 09.07.2019
Upside-down 3D-printed skin and bone, for humans to Mars
Upside-down 3D-printed skin and bone, for humans to Mars
3D printing human tissue could help keep astronauts healthy all the way to Mars. An ESA project has produced its first bioprinted skin and bone samples. These state-of-the-art samples were prepared by scientists from the University Hospital of Dresden Technical University (TUD) , part of the project consortium together with OHB System AG as the prime contractor, and life sciences specialist Blue Horizon.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.07.2019
Coral reefs shifting away from equator
Coral reefs shifting away from equator
Coral reefs are retreating from equatorial waters and establishing new reefs in more temperate regions, according to new research published July 4 in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. The researchers found that the number of young corals on tropical reefs has declined by 85% - and doubled on subtropical reefs - during the last four decades.

Life Sciences - 09.07.2019
Social Networks of Protein Pieces
Computer scientists at Freie Universität Berlin design a method for computer-aided modeling and simulation of large proteins and other biomolecules No 210/2019 from Jul 09, 2019 Two computational scientists at Freie Universität Berlin are changing the way large proteins modeled inside computers by combining machine learning, an area of artificial intelligence, with statistical physics.

Life Sciences - Physics - 09.07.2019
Tungsten as interstellar radiation shielding?
Tungsten as interstellar radiation shielding?
Metallophilic microorganisms could benefit from the heavy metal in harsh survival conditions A boiling point of 5900 degrees Celsius and diamond-like hardness in combination with carbon: tungsten is the heaviest metal, yet has biological functions - especially in heat-loving microorganisms. A team led by Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna report for the first time rare microbial-tungsten interactions at the nanometer range.

Environment - 09.07.2019
Can't Take the Heat? 'Cool Walls' Can Reduce Energy Costs, Pollution
Can’t Take the Heat? ’Cool Walls’ Can Reduce Energy Costs, Pollution
If these walls could talk, they might tell you that cutting energy costs and pollution may be as easy as giving them a fresh coat of lighter, more reflective paint. A study by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) modeled several different types and ages of homes, retail stores, and office buildings in cities across California and the U.S., and found that in many places sunlight-reflecting "cool" exterior walls can save as much or more energy than sunlight-reflecting cool roofs.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 09.07.2019
Making sense of science
A University of Sussex professor has helped draw up new guidance to aid European policymakers in making better informed decisions on issues of complex scientific evidence. Professor Andy Stirling has contributed to the new report Making Sense of Science by Science Advice for Policy by European Advisors (SAPEA) which brings together outstanding expertise in engineering, humanities, medicine, natural and social sciences from over 100 academies, young academies and learned societies across Europe.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.07.2019
On-demand control of terahertz and infrared waves
On-demand control of terahertz and infrared waves
Researchers from the University of Geneva and the University of Manchester have confirmed experimentally the theory of very strong magneto-optical resonance in graphene. The ability to control infrared and terahertz waves using magnetic or electric fields is one of the great challenges in physics that could revolutionise opto-electronics, telecommunications and medical diagnostics.

Physics - 09.07.2019
A connection between quantum correlations and spacetime geometry
A connection between quantum correlations and spacetime geometry
Researchers of the Academy explore the consequences of locality for measurements distributed in spacetime. Their article has now been published in the Nature journal "Quantum Information". Locality is a fundamental principle behind all physical interactions. It says that each physical system can only interact with other systems in its immediate vicinity, so that interactions between two distant objects must be mediated by an intermediary.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 08.07.2019
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
Researchers have developed world-leading Compound Semiconductor (CS) technology that can drive future high-speed data communications. A team from Cardiff University worked to innovate an ultrafast and highly sensitive ‘avalanche photodiode' (APD) that creates less electronic ‘noise' than its silicon rivals.

Electroengineering - 08.07.2019
No escape for mosquitoes
No escape for mosquitoes
Venus flytraps are capable of detecting the movements of even the smallest insects. This mechanism protects the plant against starving from hyperactivity as a new study conducted by scientists from Würzburg and Cambridge reveals. Physically bound to a specific location, plants have to devise special ways to secure their supply of vital nutrients.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2019
Sports playbook helps doctors predict cancer patient outcomes
Using in-game win probability techniques, Stanford researchers devised a way to predict a cancer patient's outcome at any point during treatment. The approach could also inform treatment decisions. In this season of global soccer competitions and hotly contested political primaries, bookies and pundits are scouring every evolving scrap of information and sifting through mountains of data in an effort to predict the outcome of the next game or election.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.07.2019
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Einstein's theory of General Relativity is world famous - but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form. Physicists at Durham University created huge supercomputer simulations of the universe to test an alternative theory. Our researchers found that f(R)-gravity - a so-called Chameleon Theory - could also explain the formation of structures in the cosmos.

Environment - 08.07.2019
Cave droplets provide window into past climates
The chemistry of drip waters that form stalagmites and stalactites in caves around the world have given researchers an insight into our past climate. In the first ever global analysis of cave drip water, an international team, led by Andy Baker at UNSW Australia and including scientists from Cardiff University, have explored how stalagmites and stalactites can show how groundwater resources have recharged in the past.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2019
Researchers probe cell division defects to gain insight into cancer
From bugs to plants to animals, for all living things to grow they must create more cells. To do so, each existing cell, whether in an embryo or an adult, receives cues to copy its chromosomes - large pieces of DNA that contain each cell's entire genetic code. In a carefully and elegantly controlled process, each cell then divides into two.

Health - Materials Science - 08.07.2019
The most successfull flat share in the world
The most successfull flat share in the world
Biofilms are enormously resistant accumulations of germs, which can cause serious problems, especially in hospitals. Like a single large creature, they can spread within wounds or colonize implants or biomedical products. With novel materials and surfaces researchers intend to combat the sturdy pathogens.

Health - Materials Science - 08.07.2019
Why do bones fail?
Can analytical methods from materials science help us better understand human bones' A research team at Empa in Thun is pursuing precisely this approach. Osteoporosis is a wide­spread disease. Every third woman and every fifth man are affected by bone loss with ad­vanc­ing age. A frequent consequence of this is a fracture of the femoral neck - a painful injury that massively impairs the quality of life of those affected.

Materials Science - Health - 08.07.2019
Deceptively real
The human heart still poses great challenges to modern medicine. More than ten million people in Europe suffer from heart failure, and quite a few of them need a donor organ. Artificial heart pumps are used to bridge the waiting time, but complications are not uncommon. The "Zurich Heart" project, in which Empa is a partner, is developing solutions.