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Results 81 - 100 of 128.


Chemistry - Physics - 08.01.2019
Nanophysicists developed a high-performance organic phototransistor
Nanophysicists developed a high-performance organic phototransistor
Converting light into electrical signals is essential for a number of future applications including imaging, optical communication and biomedical sensing. Researchers from the University of Münster have now developed a new molecular device enabling to detect light and translate it with high efficiency to detectable electronical current.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 08.01.2019
Wireless, battery-free, biodegradable blood flow sensor
Transforming super-sensitive touch sensors, Stanford engineers and medical researchers build a way to wirelessly monitor blood flow after surgery. A new device developed by Stanford University researchers could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery. The sensor, detailed in a paper published Jan.

Environment - 08.01.2019
A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future
Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists at the University of Oxford has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017. Over the past century, increased greenhouse gas emissions have given rise to an excess of energy in the Earth system.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 08.01.2019
Anticancer Drugs Formed through Molecular Evolution
Scientists at Freie Universität Explore Alternative Routes to Drugs against Tumor Cells / Findings published in online journal "Nature Communications" No 002/2019 from Jan 08, 2019 Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin have discovered an alternative route to drugs against tumor cells. The group led by Jörg Rademann from the Institute of Pharmacy examined the protein STAT5, which is responsible for the aggressive growth of human leukemia cells.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2019
Longer siesta on bright days
Longer siesta on bright days
Insects and mammals have special sensors for different light intensities. These sensors selectively influence the circadian clocks and thereby control daily activity patterns. Increasing sunlight intensity extends the sleep duration and results in a longer midday siesta which delays the resumption of activity to the evening.

Environment - 07.01.2019
Producing more solar power in wintertime thanks to snow
Producing more solar power in wintertime thanks to snow
Installing photovoltaic panels in high mountains could significantly reduce the power deficit experienced by this renewable energy in winter, according to a joint study by the WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF and EPFL. The Swiss Energy Strategy 2050 reflects the decision to abandon nuclear power in the medium term.

Health - 07.01.2019
Opioid crisis roadmap overlooks gender
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Astronomy / Space Science - 07.01.2019
TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet
TESS discovers its third new planet, with longest orbit yet
Measurements indicate a dense, gaseous, "sub-Neptune" world, three times the size of Earth. NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, TESS, has discovered a third small planet outside our solar system, scientists announced this week at the annual American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle.

Physics - 07.01.2019
New way of switching exotic properties on and off in topological material
SLAC/Stanford team discovers new way of switching exotic properties on and off in topological material SLAC/Stanford team discovers new way of switching exotic properties on and off in topological material Ultrafast manipulation of material properties with light could stimulate the development of novel electronics, including quantum computers.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
A growing number of genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity.  The findings show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a handful of countries - the UK, US and Iceland, and have specific demographic characteristics.

Health - 07.01.2019
Recent report places Glasgow as UK lead in pancreatic cancer research
A recent report has revealed that half of the top dozen UK pancreatic cancer researchers are based in Glasgow, with all six being affiliated with the University of Glasgow. The analysis, from the expertscape.com, confirms Glasgow's position as a leading centre of excellence for pancreatic cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New material could ’drive wound healing’ using the body’s inbuilt healing system
Imperial researchers have developed a new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
New materials could ’drive wound healing’ by harnessing natural healing methods
Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores , and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 07.01.2019
Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?
Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?
Science + Technology UCLA psychologists' experiments demonstrate severe limitations of 'deep learning' machines Stuart Wolpert How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, a team of UCLA cognitive psychologists reports in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.01.2019
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Remembering to take medication is vital for managing long term health conditions such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or multiple conditions. Latest research from the University of Cambridge suggests that using interactive voice response (IVR) technology supports patients to take their medicine as prescribed.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 07.01.2019
Gene map offers osteoporosis hope
An atlas of genetic markers may hold the key to unlocking new treatments for osteoporosis, thanks to University of Queensland researchers. The team identified more than 500 genetic markers which determine bone mineral density, one of the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis. Researchers hope the atlas will lead to the development of treatments by highlighting a select set of genes.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2019
Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm
Multiple miscarriages may be linked to the poor quality of a man's sperm, suggests new research. The early-stage study, from scientists at Imperial College London , investigated the sperm quality of 50 men whose partners had suffered three or more consecutive miscarriages.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.01.2019
Tiny satellites could be
Tiny satellites could be "guide stars" for huge next-generation telescopes
Researchers design CubeSats with lasers to provide steady reference light for telescopes investigating distant planets. There are more than 3,900 confirmed planets beyond our solar system. Most of them have been detected because of their "transits" - instances when a planet crosses its star, momentarily blocking its light.

History / Archeology - 04.01.2019
Ancient urban villa with shrine for ancestor worship discovered in Egypt
Excavation work led by the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute team has unearthed a large urban villa dating back to the early New Kingdom, about 1500-1450 B.C.E. The findings at the site of Tell Edfu in southern Egypt include a large hall containing a rare and well-preserved example of a domestic shrine dedicated to family ancestors.

Physics - 04.01.2019
Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics
Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics
After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices. They were the first to control exciton flows at room temperature. And now, the team of scientists from EPFL's Laboratory of Nanoscale Electronics and Structures (LANES) has taken their technology one step further.