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Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 04.02.2019
Colliding Exoplanets
There are currently about 2000 confirmed exoplanets with radii less than about three Earth-radii, and measurements of their densities reveal an astonishing diversity. Some have densities lower than Neptune which is made mostly of volatiles (materials less dense than metal and rock, but Neptune has almost four times the Earth's radius), while others appear to have rock-like densities, as high as the Earth's or higher.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 04.02.2019
Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Climate-driven changes in phytoplankton communities will intensify the blue and green regions of the world's oceans. Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 01.02.2019
Stanford spurs AI navigation for space rendezvous software
A Stanford engineer is helping to develop an AI-based navigation system that would enable the space-borne equivalent of tow trucks to find and rescue satellites from so-called graveyard orbits. (Image credit: Pixabay) Stanford researchers are developing an AI-powered navigation system to direct spaceborne 'tow trucks' designed to restart or remove derelict satellites circling aimlessly in graveyard orbits.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.01.2019
Knighthood for groundbreaking UofG astrophysicist
A pioneering University of Glasgow researcher who helped deliver the historic first detection of gravitational waves has received a knighthood in recognition of his contribution to physics and astronomy. James Hough, Research Professor in Natural Philosophy in the School of Physics and Astronomy, was made a Knight Bachelor of the British Empire by the Duke of Cambridgeduring a ceremony at Buckingham Palace today (Thursday 31 January).

Computer Science / Telecom - Astronomy / Space Science - 30.01.2019
Engineers program marine robots to take calculated risks
Algorithm could help autonomous underwater vehicles explore risky but scientifically-rewarding environments. We know far less about the Earth's oceans than we do about the surface of the moon or Mars. The sea floor is carved with expansive canyons, towering seamounts, deep trenches, and sheer cliffs, most of which are considered too dangerous or inaccessible for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) to navigate.

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.01.2019
Active galaxies point to new physics of cosmic expansion
Active galaxies point to new physics of cosmic expansion
Investigating the history of our cosmos with a large sample of distant 'active' galaxies observed by ESA's XMM-Newton, a team of astronomers found there might be more to the early expansion of the Universe than predicted by the standard model of cosmology. According to the leading scenario, our Universe contains only a few percent of ordinary matter.

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.01.2019
Black holes shed light on expanding Universe
Black holes shed light on expanding Universe
Scientists are using supermassive black holes to measure the expansion of the early Universe. The researchers, including our astronomers here at Durham University, think that their measurements show the Universe might be growing more rapidly than previously thought. Supermassive black holes give off radiation as they feed and are some of the brightest points of light in space.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.01.2019
How to Escape a Black Hole: Simulations Provide New Clues to What's Driving Powerful Plasma Jets
How to Escape a Black Hole: Simulations Provide New Clues to What’s Driving Powerful Plasma Jets
Black holes are known for their voracious appetites, binging on matter with such ferocity that not even light can escape once it's swallowed up. Less understood, though, is how black holes purge energy locked up in their rotation, jetting near-light-speed plasmas into space to opposite sides in one of the most powerful displays in the universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.01.2019
When Black Holes Collide
When Black Holes Collide
One of the most cataclysmic events to occur in the cosmos involves the collision of two black holes. Formed from the deathly collapse of massive stars, black holes are incredibly compact-a person standing near a stellar-mass black hole would feel gravity about a trillion times more strongly than they would on Earth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.01.2019
Seeing double could help resolve dispute about how fast the universe is expanding
Seeing double could help resolve dispute about how fast the universe is expanding
Science + Technology Team led by two UCLA astronomers uses split images of quasars to produce a new estimate of the Hubble constant Christopher Crockett The question of how quickly the universe is expanding has been bugging astronomers for almost a century. Different studies keep coming up with different answers — which has some researchers wondering if they've overlooked a key mechanism in the machinery that drives the cosmos.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.01.2019
Mystery orbits in outermost reaches of solar system not caused by 'Planet Nine', say researchers
Mystery orbits in outermost reaches of solar system not caused by ’Planet Nine’, say researchers
The strange orbits of some objects in the farthest reaches of our solar system, hypothesised by some astronomers to be shaped by an unknown ninth planet, can instead be explained by the combined gravitational force of small objects orbiting the Sun beyond Neptune, say researchers.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.01.2019
Saturn hasn't always had rings
Saturn hasn’t always had rings
One of the last acts of NASA's Cassini spacecraft before its death plunge into Saturn's hydrogen and helium atmosphere was to coast between the planet and its rings and let them tug it around, essentially acting as a gravity probe. Precise measurements of Cassini's final trajectory have now allowed scientists to make the first accurate estimate of the amount of material in the planet's rings, weighing them based on the strength of their gravitational pull.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.01.2019
Scientists Team Up With Industry to Mass-Produce Detectors for Next-Gen Cosmic Experiment
Scientists Team Up With Industry to Mass-Produce Detectors for Next-Gen Cosmic Experiment
Berkeley Lab researcher leads effort to take specialized superconducting sensor-making processes into commercial production Chasing clues about the infant universe in relic light known as the cosmic microwave background, or CMB, scientists are devising more elaborate and ultrasensitive detector arrays to measure the properties of this light with increasing precision.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.01.2019
UW research instrument returns from 22,000-mile seaward journey
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 1/15/19 × A portable research lab known as SPARCLET, developed at UW-Madison, traveled aboard the research vessel Thomas G. Thompson for two months to aid in a study aimed at better understanding how pollutants and turbulent conditions over the Philippine Sea affect the region and influence global weather.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.01.2019
Measurement of five flashes from the depths of the universe
Measurement of five flashes from the depths of the universe
First-time precise measurement of gamma-ray bursts conducted successfully from a space station A detector called POLAR, developed at PSI, has been sent to outer space to collect data. In September 2016, the device was launched into Earth orbit on board the newest Chinese space station. From that vantage point, POLAR recorded so-called gamma-ray bursts flashing in the far reaches of the universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.01.2019
Ricocheting Black Hole Jet Discovered by Chandra
Astronomers have discovered behavior by a jet from a giant black hole that has never been seen before. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory they have observed a jet that bounced off a wall of gas and then punched a hole in a cloud of energetic particles. This behavior can tell scientists more about how jets from black holes interact with their surroundings.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.01.2019
Double Star System Flips Planet-Forming Disk into Pole Position
Harvard & Smithsonian has found the first confirmed example of a double star system that has flipped its surrounding disc to a position that leaps over the orbital plane of those stars. The international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) to obtain high-resolution images of the Asteroid belt-sized disc.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
ESA's high-energy space telescopes Integral and XMM-Newton have helped to find a source of powerful X-rays at the centre of an unprecedentedly bright and rapidly evolving stellar explosion that suddenly appeared in the sky earlier this year. The ATLAS telescope in Hawaii first spotted the phenomenon, since then named AT2018cow, on 16 June.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Signatures of a 'messy' star that made its companion go supernova
Signatures of a ’messy’ star that made its companion go supernova
Many stars explode as luminous supernovae when, swollen with age, they run out of fuel for nuclear fusion. But some stars can go supernova simply because they have a close and pesky companion star that, one day, perturbs its partner so much that it explodes. These latter events can happen in binary star systems, where two stars attempt to share dominion.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Data captured by ESA's galaxy-mapping spacecraft Gaia has revealed for the first time how white dwarfs, the dead remnants of stars like our Sun, turn into solid spheres as the hot gas inside them cools down. This process of solidification, or crystallisation, of the material inside white dwarfs was predicted 50 years ago but it wasn't until the arrival of Gaia that astronomers were able to observe enough of these objects with such a precision to see the pattern revealing this process.
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