News 2019

« BACK

Astronomy/Space Science



Results 81 - 100 of 234.


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.07.2019
Hunting for
Hunting for "ghost particles": Neutrino observatory at the South Pole will be extended
For almost ten years, scientists from all over the world have been using the large-scale experiment "IceCube" to search for neutrinos in the permanent ice of the South Pole. Neutrinos are the smallest particles that reach Earth as cosmic rays. Now the participating researchers, among them Prof. Alexander Kappes from the University of Münster, are pleased about a huge upgrade of the laboratory, which should contribute to measuring the properties of neutrinos much more accurately than before.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.07.2019
Some Assembly Required: Scientists Piece Together the Largest U.S.-Based Dark Matter Experiment
Some Assembly Required: Scientists Piece Together the Largest U.S.-Based Dark Matter Experiment
M ost of the remaining components needed to fully assemble an underground dark matter-search experiment called LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) arrived at the project's South Dakota home during a rush of deliveries in June. When complete, LZ will be the largest, most sensitive U.S.-based experiment yet that is designed to directly detect dark matter particles.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.07.2019
New measure of Hubble constant adds to mystery about universe’s expansion rate
University of Chicago scientists have made a new measurement of how fast the universe is expanding-using an entirely different kind of star than previous endeavors. That value falls in the center of a hotly debated question in astrophysics that may call for an entirely new model of the universe. Scientists have known for almost a century that the universe is expanding, but the exact number for how fast it's going has remained stubbornly elusive.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.07.2019
Using ’mooncrete’ for building blocks on the moon
College of Engineering associate professor Ali Ghahremaninezhad (right) is testing different biopolymers to determine which would be most effective in turning lunar soil into a hardened, concrete-type substance. Photo: Evan Garcia/University of Miami College of Engineering associate professor Ali Ghahremaninezhad (right) is testing different biopolymers to determine which would be most effective in turning lunar soil into a hardened, concrete-type substance.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.07.2019
New Findings on Early Bombardment of the Earth and Moon and Their Development
Freie Universität Researchers Contribute to International Study Published in Nature No 215/2019 from Jul 12, 2019 How did the Earth evolve from a fireball about 4.5 billion years ago to a habitable world? The key to this question lies in the early history of our planet, when the bombardment with cosmic bodies slowly declined.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 11.07.2019
Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets
Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets
In recent years, the idea of life on other planets has become less far-fetched. NASA announced June 27 that it will send a vehicle to Saturn's icy moon Titan , a celestial body known to harbor surface lakes of methane and an ice-covered ocean of water, boosting its chance for supporting life. On Earth, scientists are studying the most extreme environments to learn how life might exist under completely different settings, like on other planets.

Astronomy / Space Science - 11.07.2019
Moon-forming disk discovered around distant planet
Moon-forming disk discovered around distant planet
Astronomers report first observations of a circumplanetary disk Using Earth's most powerful array of radio telescopes, astronomers have made the first observations of a circumplanetary disk of gas and dust like the one that is believed to have birthed the moons of Jupiter. The find, reported online today in Astrophysical Journal Letters, adds to the intriguing story of planet PDS 70 c, a still-forming gas giant about 370 light years from Earth that was first revealed last month in visible light images.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 09.07.2019
Upside-down 3D-printed skin and bone, for humans to Mars
Upside-down 3D-printed skin and bone, for humans to Mars
3D printing human tissue could help keep astronauts healthy all the way to Mars. An ESA project has produced its first bioprinted skin and bone samples. These state-of-the-art samples were prepared by scientists from the University Hospital of Dresden Technical University (TUD) , part of the project consortium together with OHB System AG as the prime contractor, and life sciences specialist Blue Horizon.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.07.2019
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Einstein's theory of General Relativity is world famous - but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form. Physicists at Durham University created huge supercomputer simulations of the universe to test an alternative theory. Our researchers found that f(R)-gravity - a so-called Chameleon Theory - could also explain the formation of structures in the cosmos.

Astronomy / Space Science - Materials Science - 28.06.2019
When CubeSats meet asteroid
When CubeSats meet asteroid
ESA's Hera mission for planetary defence, being designed to survey the smallest asteroid ever explored, is really three spacecraft in one. The main mothership will carry two briefcase-sized CubeSats, which will touch down on the target body. A French team has been investigating what might happen at that initial instant of alien contact.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 20.06.2019
Spaceship Concordia
Spaceship Concordia
Science for the benefit of space exploration does not only happen off planet. While some studies require the weightless isolation of the International Space Station, another location provides the right conditions for investigating the consequences of spaceflight, and it is right here on Earth. The 2018 crew of Concordia research station in Antarctica recently returned to the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne to wrap up their time as researchers and subjects at Earth's most remote outpost.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 19.06.2019
Abundance of gases in Enceladus's ocean are a potential fuel - if life is there to consume it
Abundance of gases in Enceladus’s ocean are a potential fuel - if life is there to consume it
The subsurface ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus probably has higher than previously known concentrations of carbon dioxide and hydrogen and a more Earthlike pH level, possibly providing conditions favorable to life, according to new research from planetary scientists at the University of Washington.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.06.2019
Scientists use X-rays from faraway galaxy cluster to reveal secrets of plasma
Most visible matter in the universe doesn't look like our textbook picture of a nucleus surrounded by tethered electrons. Out beyond our borders, inside massive clusters, galaxies swim in a sea of plasma-a form of matter in which electrons and nuclei wander unmoored. Though it makes up the majority of the visible matter in the universe, this plasma remains poorly understood; scientists do not have a theory that fully describes its behavior, especially at small scales.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.06.2019
Scientists use atoms to simulate quantum physics in curved spacetimes
Black holes fascinate the public and scientists alike because they are where it all breaks down: matter, unlucky stars and space flotsam, and our understanding of physics. And while scientists have chipped away at their mysteries-from capturing the first image of one , to detecting the ripples in space-time they create when colliding-key parts of understanding black holes have escaped them.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.06.2019
Melting a satellite, a piece at a time
Melting a satellite, a piece at a time
Researchers took one of the densest parts of an Earth-orbiting satellite, placed it in a plasma wind tunnel then proceeded to melt it into vapour. Their goal was to better understand how satellites burn up during reentry, to minimise the risk of endangering anyone on the ground. Taking place as part of ESA's Clean Space initiative, the fiery testing occurred inside a plasma wind tunnel, reproducing reentry conditions, at the DLR German Aerospace Center's site in Cologne.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.06.2019
Gemini Planet Imager analyzes 300 stars
Gemini Planet Imager analyzes 300 stars
Analysis from halfway through the Gemini Planet Imager's planetary survey hints that our solar system may have rare qualities which could possibly be related to the habitability of Earth. Over the past four years, an instrument attached to a telescope in the Chilean Andes - known as the Gemini Planet Imager - has set its gaze on 531 stars in search of new planets.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 11.06.2019
Science from the Space Station
Science from the Space Station
In the age of social media, no new experience goes undocumented. On Earth, we fill our camera rolls with weekends away, social events and time spent with family and friends. But just imagine how many photos you might take if you lived and worked in space. With its incredible outlook on Earth below, the Cupola is a favourite spot for astronauts onboard the International Space Station.

Astronomy / Space Science - Innovation / Technology - 11.06.2019
Hera asteroid mission's brain to be radiation-hard and failure-proof
Hera asteroid mission’s brain to be radiation-hard and failure-proof
At the heart of ESA's Hera mission to the double Didymos asteroids will be an onboard computer intended to be failure-proof. Designed to operate up to 490 million km away from Earth and withstanding four years of harsh radiation exposure, Hera's computer must run smoothly without locking up or crashing - on pain of mission failure, while pushing the limits of onboard autonomy.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 11.06.2019
Dwarf planet Ceres: a new form of volcanism found
Dwarf planet Ceres: a new form of volcanism found
An international research team solves the mystery of how the mountain Ahuna Mons on Ceres was probably formed / Study in "Nature Geoscience" The scientists could hardly believe their eyes when they first saw this formation on the images acquired by their Framing Camera on board the Dawn space probe: a symmetrical mountain over 4000 metres tall and with steep, smooth sides rising over the crater-strewn surface of.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.06.2019
Technique pulls interstellar magnetic fields within easy reach
The formation of stars in the turbulent billows of gas and dust of the Orion Molecular Cloud, depicted in an illustration based on data from the European Space Agency's Planck satellite. ESA and the Planck Collaboration A new, more accessible and much cheaper approach to surveying the topology and strength of interstellar magnetic fields - which weave through space in our galaxy and beyond, representing one of the most potent forces in nature - has been developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |