News 2019

« BACK

Earth Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 52.
1 2 3 Next »


Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 16.05.2019
Geologists discover previously unknown region of the Earth's mantle
Geologists discover previously unknown region of the Earth’s mantle
The Bermuda Islands - a very special terrain in the middle of the western Atlantic Ocean, not only for its white beaches, but also because the archipelago is at the top of a 4,570-metre high volcano that died out about 30 million years ago. An international team of researchers has now taken a closer look at this geological peculiarity and geochemically examined the magma rock under Bermuda for the first time.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.05.2019
3D Earth in the making
3D Earth in the making
15 May 2019 A thorough understanding of the 'solid Earth' system is essential for deciphering the links between processes occurring deep inside Earth and those occurring nearer the surface that lead to seismic activity such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, the rise of mountains and the location of underground natural resources.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 13.05.2019
Concludes Glassy Menagerie of Particles in Beach Sands Near Hiroshima is Fallout Debris from A-Bomb Blast
Concludes Glassy Menagerie of Particles in Beach Sands Near Hiroshima is Fallout Debris from A-Bomb Blast
Mario Wannier, a career geologist with expertise in studying tiny marine life, was methodically sorting through particles in samples of beach sand from Japan's Motoujina Peninsula when he spotted something unexpected: a number of tiny, glassy spheres and other unusual objects. Wannier, who is now retired, had been comparing biological debris in beach sands from different areas in an effort to gauge the health of local and regional marine ecosystems.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 08.05.2019
In Nature: Just One-Third of the World’s Longest Rivers Remain Free-Flowing
Channels McGill University News and Events o Only 37% of the world's longest rivers remain free-flowing o Nearly 60,000 large dams exist worldwide, with more than 3,700 currently planned or under construction o Climate change is a growing threat to river health worldwide, both from direct impacts and as countries increasingly turn to hydropower as a renewable energy option Just over one-third (37%) of the world's 246 longest rivers remain free-flowing, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Nature .

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 02.05.2019
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 tonne giants so successful? A new study, published in Paleobiology, shows that their special adaptations in teeth and jaws and in their head crests were crucial, and provides new insights into how these innovations evolved.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 24.04.2019
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Around three years ago, researchers on an Antarctic expedition, including Münster University palaeobotanist Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur , made an incredible discovery in northern Victoria Land. They found the 200 million-year-old footprint of an extinct reptile. The researchers have now published their findings from the hand-sized footprint in the journal “Polar Research”.

Earth Sciences - 18.04.2019
Data mining digs up hidden clues to major California earthquake triggers
Data mining digs up hidden clues to major California earthquake triggers
Comprehensive new earthquake catalog includes 10 times more quakes than previously identified, with a more detailed picture of stresses and structures in the earth A historic image of quake damage in Long Beach, California, 1933. CREDIT: W.L. Huber, USGS (Public domain) It's very difficult to unpack what triggers larger earthquakes because they are infrequent, but with this new information about a huge number of small earthquakes, we can see how stress evolves in fault systems.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2019
Historic logging site shows first human-caused bedrock erosion along an entire river
Historic logging site shows first human-caused bedrock erosion along an entire river
Geologic time is supposed to be slow, and the most solid object should be bedrock. But new University of Washington research upends both concepts: Effects of logging show that human activity can significantly erode bedrock, causing geology to fast forward. The study, published April 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , focuses on the Teanaway River, a picturesque river in central Washington state.

Earth Sciences - 08.04.2019
Melting Glaciers Causing Sea Levels to Rise at Ever Greater Rates
Melting Glaciers Causing Sea Levels to Rise at Ever Greater Rates
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic as well as ice melt from glaciers all over the world are causing sea levels to rise. Glaciers alone lost more than 9,000 billion tons of ice since 1961, raising water levels by 27 millimeters, an international research team under the lead of UZH have now found.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 01.04.2019
Mars Express matches methane spike measured by Curiosity
Mars Express matches methane spike measured by Curiosity
1 April 2019 A reanalysis of data collected by ESA's Mars Express during the first 20 months of NASA's Curiosity mission found one case of correlated methane detection, the first time an in-situ measurement has been independently confirmed from orbit. Reports of methane in the martian atmosphere have been intensely debated, with Mars Express contributing one of the first measurements from orbit in 2004, shortly after its arrival at the Red Planet.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 29.03.2019
North Dakota site shows wreckage from same object that killed the dinosaurs
North Dakota site shows wreckage from same object that killed the dinosaurs
Newly discovered evidence in North Dakota sheds new light on what happened when a giant meteorite struck planet Earth, 66 millions of years ago. On that day, violent ground shaking first raised giant waves in the waters of an inland sea. Then tiny beads began to fall, created from molten rock cooling at the edge of space to make glassy beads.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 29.03.2019
66 million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor
66 million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor
The beginning of the end started with violent shaking that raised giant waves in the waters of an inland sea in what is now North Dakota. Then, tiny glass beads began to fall like birdshot from the heavens. The rain of glass was so heavy it may have set fire to much of the vegetation on land. In the water, fish struggled to breathe as the beads clogged their gills.

Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
Volcano cliffs can affect monitoring data
New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and co-authored by the University of Bristol reveals that sharp variations of the surface of volcanoes can affect data collected by monitoring equipment. The surfaces of many volcanoes feature steep walls or cliffs. These are often part of calderas - large craters left by a previous collapse - but can also be caused by the volcano ‘rifting' - or splitting - or sector collapse, when part of the side of the volcano slides away.

Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
A young researcher at EPFL has demonstrated that the viscosity of fluids present in faults has a direct effect on the force of earthquakes. Fault zones play a key role in shaping the deformation of the Earth's crust. All of these zones contain fluids, which heavily influence how earthquakes propagate.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 21.03.2019
What can machine learning tell us about the solid Earth?
What can machine learning tell us about the solid Earth?
Scientists are training machine learning algorithms to help shed light on earthquake hazards, volcanic eruptions, groundwater flow and longstanding mysteries about what goes on beneath the Earth's surface. Scientists seeking to understand Earth's inner clockwork have deployed armies of sensors listening for signs of slips, rumbles, exhales and other disturbances emanating from the planet's deepest faults to its tallest volcanoes.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 14.03.2019
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth’s ice ages
Major tectonic collisions near the equator have caused three ice ages in the last 540 million years. Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages - periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.03.2019
How marine snow cools the planet
How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers in the School of Geosciences have mapped out how carbonate formations have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Adriana Dutkiewicz warns global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. University of Sydney scientists have modelled how carbonate accumulation from 'marine snow' in oceans has absorbed carbon dioxide over millennia and been a key driver in keeping the planet cool for millions of years.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 13.03.2019
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain - with people and animals travelling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals. The study, led by Dr Richard Madgwick of Cardiff University, is the most comprehensive to date and examined the bones of 131 pigs, the prime feasting animals, from four Late Neolithic (c.

Earth Sciences - 13.03.2019
Researchers unravel mysteries of Earth's inner core
Researchers unravel mysteries of Earth’s inner core
Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) are unlocking some of the secrets of the Earth's inner core by adapting and further developing a technique used in hospitals around the world. Tomography is the imaging process used in x-rays and ultrasounds, and involves waves passing through the body, before bouncing off body tissue and back to a receiver.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.03.2019
Rescuing geologic and climate records
Rescuing geologic and climate records
Postdoc Daniel Ibarra recently traveled to the Philippines to collect cave deposits that are considered key to understanding changes in climate during ancient times. Scattered throughout the Philippines are many caves containing precious geological formations that hold key information about past climate.
1 2 3 Next »