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Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
Volcano cliffs can affect monitoring data
New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and co-authored by the University of Bristol reveals that sharp variations of the surface of volcanoes can affect data collected by monitoring equipment. The surfaces of many volcanoes feature steep walls or cliffs. These are often part of calderas - large craters left by a previous collapse - but can also be caused by the volcano ‘rifting' - or splitting - or sector collapse, when part of the side of the volcano slides away.

Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
A young researcher at EPFL has demonstrated that the viscosity of fluids present in faults has a direct effect on the force of earthquakes. Fault zones play a key role in shaping the deformation of the Earth's crust. All of these zones contain fluids, which heavily influence how earthquakes propagate.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 21.03.2019
What can machine learning tell us about the solid Earth?
What can machine learning tell us about the solid Earth?
Scientists are training machine learning algorithms to help shed light on earthquake hazards, volcanic eruptions, groundwater flow and longstanding mysteries about what goes on beneath the Earth's surface. Scientists seeking to understand Earth's inner clockwork have deployed armies of sensors listening for signs of slips, rumbles, exhales and other disturbances emanating from the planet's deepest faults to its tallest volcanoes.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 14.03.2019
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth’s ice ages
Major tectonic collisions near the equator have caused three ice ages in the last 540 million years. Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages - periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.03.2019
How marine snow cools the planet
How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers in the School of Geosciences have mapped out how carbonate formations have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Adriana Dutkiewicz warns global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. University of Sydney scientists have modelled how carbonate accumulation from 'marine snow' in oceans has absorbed carbon dioxide over millennia and been a key driver in keeping the planet cool for millions of years.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 13.03.2019
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain - with people and animals travelling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals. The study, led by Dr Richard Madgwick of Cardiff University, is the most comprehensive to date and examined the bones of 131 pigs, the prime feasting animals, from four Late Neolithic (c.

Earth Sciences - 13.03.2019
Researchers unravel mysteries of Earth's inner core
Researchers unravel mysteries of Earth’s inner core
Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) are unlocking some of the secrets of the Earth's inner core by adapting and further developing a technique used in hospitals around the world. Tomography is the imaging process used in x-rays and ultrasounds, and involves waves passing through the body, before bouncing off body tissue and back to a receiver.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.03.2019
Rescuing geologic and climate records
Rescuing geologic and climate records
Postdoc Daniel Ibarra recently traveled to the Philippines to collect cave deposits that are considered key to understanding changes in climate during ancient times. Scattered throughout the Philippines are many caves containing precious geological formations that hold key information about past climate.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 06.03.2019
Fossilised palm leaves give new insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet
Fossilised palm leaves give new insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet
A team of scientists from the UK and China have uncovered new evidence, using recently-discovered 25-million-year-old fossilised palm leaves, that Tibet's geography was not as 'high and dry' as previously thought. The new research, co-authored by academics from the University of Bristol's School of Geographical Sciences , suggests that central Tibet must have been no higher than 2.3km with large lakes fringed with subtropical vegetation and deep, hidden valleys.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 06.03.2019
Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out
Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out
Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike, new research, co-authored by the University of Bristol, has found. Scientists largely agree that an asteroid impact, possibly coupled with intense volcanic activity, wiped out the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period 66 million years ago.

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 06.03.2019
Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out
Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out
Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike. Scientists largely agree that an asteroid impact, possibly coupled with intense volcanic activity, wiped out the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period 66 million years ago. Dinosaurs were likely not doomed to extinction until the end of the Cretaceous, when the asteroid hit.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 04.03.2019
Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved
Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved
Research led by the University of Washington proposes a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery. The study is published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Earth Sciences - 01.03.2019
'Amazing snapshots' plumb volcanic depths
’Amazing snapshots’ plumb volcanic depths
Research shedding light on the internal “plumbing” of volcanoes may help scientists better understand volcanic eruptions and unrest. The University of Queensland-led study analysed crystals in Italy's famous Mount Etna to reveal how quickly magma moves to the surface. Dr Teresa Ubide , from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences , said the research would provide a better understanding of volcanic systems and improve frameworks for monitoring volcanoes.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 28.02.2019
First evidence of planet-wide groundwater system on Mars
First evidence of planet-wide groundwater system on Mars
Mars Express has revealed the first geological evidence of a system of ancient interconnected lakes that once lay deep beneath the Red Planet's surface, five of which may contain minerals crucial to life. Mars appears to be an arid world, but its surface shows compelling signs that large amounts of water once existed across the planet.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 27.02.2019
Thousands of tiny quakes shake Antarctic ice at night
Stay overnight on an Antarctic ice shelf, and you may feel the shaking from thousands of tiny quakes as the ice re-forms after melting during the day. In a recent study , UChicago scientists placed seismometers on the McMurdo Ice Shelf and recorded hundreds of thousands of tiny "ice quakes" that appear to be caused by pools of partially melted ice expanding and freezing at night.

Earth Sciences - 22.02.2019
Copernicus Sentinel-1 reveals shared plumbing led to Agung awakening
Copernicus Sentinel-1 reveals shared plumbing led to Agung awakening
When Mount Agung in Indonesia erupted in 2017, the search was on to find out why it had stirred. Thanks to information on ground deformation from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, scientists now have more insight into the volcano's hidden secrets that caused it to reawaken. After lying dormant for more than 50 years, Mount Agung on the Indonesian holiday island of Bali rumbled back to life in November 2017, with smoke and ash causing airport closures and stranding thousands of visitors.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 22.02.2019
Diving into Earth's interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation
Diving into Earth’s interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation
Understanding the global carbon cycle provides scientists with vital clues about the planet's habitability. It's the reason why the Earth has a clement stable climate and a low carbon dioxide atmosphere compared to that of Venus, for instance, which is in a runaway greenhouse state with high surface temperatures and a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.02.2019
Using AI to avert 'environmental catastrophe'
Using AI to avert ’environmental catastrophe’
A new Centre at the University of Cambridge will develop AI techniques to help address some of the biggest threats facing the planet.  These datasets represent a transformation in the way we can study and understand the Earth and environment, as we assess and find solutions to environmental risk Simon Redfern Funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), the Centre for Doctoral Training in Application of Artificial Intelligence to the study of Environmental Risks (AI4ER) is one of 16 new Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs) announced today.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 21.02.2019
Asteroid or volcanos' Apportioning blame for the dinosaur extinction
Asteroid or volcanos’ Apportioning blame for the dinosaur extinction
Based on new data published today in the journal Science , it seems increasingly likely that an asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago reignited massive volcanic eruptions in India, half a world away from the impact site in the Caribbean Sea. But it leaves unclear to what degree the two catastrophes contributed to the near-simultaneous mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs and many other forms of life.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 20.02.2019
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history - the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University and colleagues from Mexico have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows.