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Electroengineering



Results 1 - 7 of 7.


Physics - Electroengineering - 21.02.2019
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
Physicists have discovered a new effect, which makes it possible to create excellent thermal insulators which conduct electricity. Such materials can be used to convert waste heat into electrical energy. Every day we lose valuable energy in the form of waste heat - in technical devices at home, but also in large energy systems.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.02.2019
The holy grail of nanowire production
The holy grail of nanowire production
EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels.

Electroengineering - Physics - 15.02.2019
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
EPFL researchers have developed a compact and efficient medium-frequency transformer. Their device is poised to enhance the flexibility and efficiency of tomorrow's smart grids and DC power distribution networks. An EPFL-made prototype has been thoroughly tested and presented in several tutorials designed for experts from the academic and industrial worlds.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.02.2019
Giving keener
Giving keener "electric eyesight" to autonomous vehicles
On-chip system that detects signals at sub-terahertz wavelengths could help steer driverless cars through fog and dust. Autonomous vehicles relying on light-based image sensors often struggle to see through blinding conditions, such as fog. But MIT researchers have developed a sub-terahertz-radiation receiving system that could help steer driverless cars when traditional methods fail.

Physics - Electroengineering - 12.02.2019
Los Alamos teams with Oak Ridge, EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security tech
Los Alamos teams with Oak Ridge, EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security tech
Quantum science comes to energy grid network protection Oak Ridge and Los Alamos national laboratory researchers collaborated with Chattanooga utility EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security technology. Back row, from left: EPB's Ken Jones, Manager, Fiber Design; Nick Peters, ORNL senior scientist and leader of the laboratory's Quantum Communications team; and ORNL researcher Phil Evans.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.02.2019
’Magnetic graphene’ switches between insulator and conductor
Researchers have found that certain ultra-thin magnetic materials can switch from insulator to conductor under high pressure, a phenomenon that could be used in the development of next-generation electronics and memory storage devices.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 28.01.2019
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Device made from flexible, inexpensive materials could power large-area electronics, wearables, medical devices, and more. Imagine a world where smartphones, laptops, wearables, and other electronics are powered without batteries. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have taken a step in that direction, with the first fully flexible device that can convert energy from Wi-Fi signals into electricity that could power electronics.