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Environment - 10.09.2019
Treating more wastewater with less energy
Treating more wastewater with less energy
More and more people are moving to cities and agglomerations in Switzerland, which is putting extreme pressure on some wastewater treatment plants: Because they are having to treat greater volumes of wastewater, their energy consumption is skyrocketing. And some WTPs are close to reaching capacity. Together with various project partners from industry, Eawag has now been testing out a new kind of technology for the past six months at the Sihltal WTP.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 09.09.2019
First day of dinosaur extinction recorded in rocks at asteroid impact site
First day of dinosaur extinction recorded in rocks at asteroid impact site
Researchers probing the impact that wiped out the dinosaurs find evidence of wildfires and tsunami in the rocks at ground zero. An international team led by University of Texas and including Imperial College London researchers analysed more than 130 metres of rock that had built up over just one day - the day after the asteroid struck.

Environment - Innovation - 09.09.2019
Interest rates are a decisive factor for competitive renewables
Renewable energy has become competitive - and one often-overlooked reason is the reduced cost of financing. Researchers from ETH Zurich and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) have modelled different scenarios in order to investigate the impact of rising interest rates on renewable energy.

Environment - 09.09.2019
Lightning ’superbolts’ form over oceans from November to February
The lightning season in the Southeastern U.S. is almost finished for this year, but the peak season for the most powerful strokes of lightning won't begin until November, according to a newly published global survey of these rare events. A University of Washington study maps the location and timing of "superbolts” - bolts that release electrical energy of more than 1 million Joules, or a thousand times more energy than the average lightning bolt, in the very low frequency range in which lightning is most active.

Environment - Chemistry - 09.09.2019
New Investigation Cuts Through the Haze Surrounding
New Investigation Cuts Through the Haze Surrounding "Smoke-Free" Tobacco Products
Scientists find that the potentially harmful emissions from a trendy smoking alternative are comparable to electronic cigarettes A class of alternative tobacco product called heat-not-burn is quickly gaining in popularity across the globe. The product manufacturers claim that these battery-operated devices produce a "clean," nicotine-laden vapor that contains fewer irritant and carcinogenic chemicals than a conventional cigarette - and are therefore a less harmful option for tobacco users.

Environment - 09.09.2019
Human influence on groundwater quality
Human influence on groundwater quality
Eawag researchers have identified the major anthropogenic threats and their chief origins in a review article. Intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, the pharmaceutical industry, poor wastewater infrastructure, lack of water-quality data as well as lack of awareness of the meaning of groundwater as a renewable resource are among the most urgent problems.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 09.09.2019
Satellites reveal peatland fire susceptibility
Satellites reveal peatland fire susceptibility
Fires in Southeast Asian peatlands release huge amounts of carbon, along with deadly smoke. Now, new satellite measurements of soil moisture may offer a promising approach to reducing those fires and their widespread haze. When large areas of carbon-rich soil catch fire, the blaze emits massive amounts of carbon into the atmosphere and creates a thick haze some residents of Southeast Asia know all too well.

Computer Science / Telecom - Environment - 06.09.2019
Machine learning and its radical application to severe weather prediction
In the last decade, artificial intelligence ("AI”) applications have exploded across various research sectors, including computer vision, communications and medicine. Now, the rapidly developing technology is making its mark in weather prediction. The fields of atmospheric science and satellite meteorology are ideally suited for the task, offering a rich training ground capable of feeding an AI system's endless appetite for data.

Environment - Business / Economics - 05.09.2019
Five cool things about our environmental research
From decarbonising heat to food security and water sustainability, we're working to bring about improvements that will benefit nature and the well-being of the planet. Durham's research is having an impact on the environment and potentially all of our lives. In fact, it's hard to imagine a more important research focus for us than the environment given that all life depends upon it.

Environment - 04.09.2019
Natural ways of cooling cities
Natural ways of cooling cities
ETH scientists have been researching the effect of precipitation and population size on rising temperatures in cities compared with the surrounding countryside. They have found that more green spaces can help to lower temperatures in urban zones - but not everywhere. Urban heat islands are a phenomenon where the temperature in a city is noticeably higher than in the surrounding rural area.

Environment - 04.09.2019
Putting a price on carbon pollution alone unlikely to help reach climate goals
Researchers show that carbon taxes alone cannot reduce emissions enough to reach the Paris Agreement targets. The Paris Agreement, signed in 2015, requires nations to collectively limit global warming to 2°C by 2100, and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5°C.

Environment - 04.09.2019
Climate change impacts Wisconsin’s inland lakes
By Jennifer A. Smith Wisconsin's abundant inland lakes form a significant part of our state's identity, economy and how residents and visitors alike relax and have fun. However, like the Great Lakes that border Wisconsin, inland lakes-of which Wisconsin has more than 15,000-face threats due to climate change.

Environment - 04.09.2019
How California Wildfires Can Impact Water Availability
How California Wildfires Can Impact Water Availability
New Berkeley Lab study uses supercomputers to analyze hydrological changes in a California watershed following a wildfire. In recent years, wildfires in the western United States have occurred with increasing frequency and scale. Climate change scenarios in California predict prolonged periods of drought with potential for conditions even more amenable to wildfires.

Health - Environment - 04.09.2019
Climate increasingly a mainstream health issue
Sydney has led a new Lancet comment on global warming and health; its publication came ahead of the latest declaration on climate as a health emergency, this time by the Australian Medical Association. Our experts explain why. The growing impact of climate on human health has prompted the Australian Medical Association to highlight climate change as a human health "emergency", it was  reported this week.

Environment - Electroengineering - 03.09.2019
River under current
River under current
Switzerland is proud of its strongly developed use of hydropower. This covers almost 60% of the country's electricity needs. The production of around 36 terawatt hours (TWh) per year is now to be increased by a further 3 TWh by 2050 as part of the energy strategy. Eawag, the water research institute, is today presenting internal and external experts at the Swiss Museum of Transport in Lucerne on the challenges this poses for water bodies and the approaches society can take to meet these challenges.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.09.2019
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat
New research has found that habitat loss is a major concern for hundreds of Australian bird species, and south-eastern Australia has been the worst affected. The Threatened Species Recovery Hub study, featuring University of Queensland scientists, found that half of all native bird species have each lost almost two-thirds of their natural habitat across Victoria, parts of South Australia and New South Wales.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.09.2019
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat loss
Native birds in South-eastern Australia worst affected by habitat loss
New research has found that habitat loss is a major concern for hundreds of Australian bird species, and south-eastern Australia has been the worst affected. The Threatened Species Recovery Hub study, featuring University of Queensland scientists, found that half of all native bird species have each lost almost two-thirds of their natural habitat across Victoria, parts of South Australia and New South Wales.

Environment - Business / Economics - 03.09.2019
A blueprint for the EU's ecological transition
Two EPFL researchers have contributed to a discussion paper for new members of the European Parliament, published ahead of the resumption of parliamentary business this week. In their chapter, they suggest that reversing the tide of deindustrialization and redistributing industrial activities in Europe could cut energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the long run.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 02.09.2019
Vintage film of Antarctic glaciers hints at early ice shelf collapse
Vintage film of Antarctic glaciers hints at early ice shelf collapse
Digitised archival film has revealed part of Thwaites Glacier is melting faster than thought, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected. Newly digitised vintage film has doubled how far back scientists can peer into the history of ice in Antarctica, and revealed that an ice shelf on Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is being thawed by a warming ocean more quickly than previously thought.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 02.09.2019
Vintage film reveals Antarctic glacier melting
Newly available archival film has revealed the eastern ice shelf of Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is melting faster than previous estimates, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected. Newly digitized vintage film has doubled how far back scientists can peer into the history of underground ice in Antarctica, and revealed that an ice shelf on Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is being thawed by a warming ocean more quickly than previously thought.
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