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Environment - 07.10.2019
China is on track to meet its ultra-low emissions goals for 2020
Polluting emissions from Chinese thermal power plants declined significantly between 2014 and 2017, according to research involving UCL. The reductions are important in helping to control China's national emissions which could lead to an improvement in air quality and considerable health benefits. A team of experts from the UK and China analysed emissions from coal, oil, natural gas and biomass power plants, with a focus on coal-fired power plants as the major contributors to ambient air pollution.

Environment - 07.10.2019
Explores how to make conservation initiatives more contagious
Research shows conservation initiatives often spread like diseases, helping scientists and policymakers design programmes more likely to be taken up. The study, led by researchers at Imperial College London, modelled how conservation initiatives are adopted across regions and countries until they reach ‘scale' - at a level where they can have real impact on conserving or improving biodiversity.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.10.2019
Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures
Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures
Scientists at Stanford have identified molecules that tough microbes use to survive in warming waters, opening a window more broadly into studying conditions in ancient seas. Solving a decades-old mystery, Stanford researchers have discovered proteins that enable hardy microbes called archaea to toughen up their membranes when waters are overly warm.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 07.10.2019
Ancient oasis once existed on Mars
Ancient oasis once existed on Mars
New findings from the ChemCam instrument show a dynamic Martian climate LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 7, 2019-The surface of Mars was once home to shallow, salty ponds that went through episodes of overflow and drying, according to a paper published today . These findings result from an analysis of rocks enriched in mineral salts in Gale Crater, a 100-mile-wide dry lakebed, performed with the ChemCam instrument, which sits atop NASA's Curiosity rover and shoots Martian rocks with a laser to determine their chemical make-up.

Environment - Health - 07.10.2019
The impact of ambient air pollution on hospital admissions
Air pollution is the centre of debate on many fronts, from air protection measures involving road traffic, to technological innovations to reduce harmful emissions.

Materials Science - Environment - 07.10.2019
The Wood Paradox
The Wood Paradox
It can be deformed as required and is three times stronger than natural wood: the wood material developed by Marion Frey, Tobias Keplinger and Ingo Burgert at Empa and ETH Zurich has the potential to become a high-tech material. In the process, the researchers remove precisely the part of the wood that gives it its stability in nature: lignin.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.10.2019
New report shows British wildlife is continuing to decline at an alarming rate
New report shows British wildlife is continuing to decline at an alarming rate
The UK's wildlife is continuing to decline, according to a new report co-authored by a University of Sussex Professor. The State of Nature 2019 report finds that, since rigorous scientific monitoring began in the 1970s, there has been a 13% decline in average abundance across wildlife studied. Butterflies and moths have been particularly hard hit with numbers of butterflies down by 17% and moths down by 25%.

Environment - 03.10.2019
Research contributes to international climate change guidelines
The International Panel on Climate Change has used University of Queensland research to update its National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Guideline for the first time in 13 years. UQ's Advanced Water Management Centre has spent a decade researching greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater systems, both in lab-scale and full-scale, in close collaboration with its many utility partners.

Transport - Environment - 03.10.2019
The right carbon tax to reduce the impact of transport in Switzerland
Using macroeconomic modeling, EPFL researchers have identified the most effective carbon tax for Switzerland to meet the Paris Agreement targets: a uniform levy on gasoline, diesel fuel and heating oil, rising steadily to 1.70 francs per liter by 2050.  The Swiss transport sector has become the country's leading CO2 emitter, accounting for 41% of total emissions.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 02.10.2019
Nearly a decade in the making, exoplanet-hunting instrument installed in Hawaii
Atop a dormant volcano in Hawaii, an extremely delicate instrument-designed to help scientists find distant worlds-is scattered across the floor in hundreds of pieces. "Imagine trying to assemble one of those huge LEGO sets, except there's no instruction book; you've done it once before, but then you had to take it all apart and put it in little bags," said Jacob Bean, associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of Chicago.

Environment - Materials Science - 30.09.2019
Reveals how hurricanes affect life below the surface
In early October 2016, a tropical storm named Nicole formed in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. It roamed for six days, intensifying to a powerful hurricane with 140 mph winds, before hitting the island of Bermuda as a Category 3 storm. Hurricanes like Nicole can cause significant damage to human structures on land, and often permanently alter terrestrial landscapes.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.09.2019
Collapse of desert birds due to heat stress
As temperatures rise, desert birds need more water to cool off at the same time as deserts are becoming drier, setting some species up for a severe crash, if not extinction, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. The team that last year documented a collapse of bird communities in Mojave Desert over the last century - 29 percent of the 135 bird species that were present 100 years ago are less common and less widespread today - has now identified a likely cause: heat stress associated with climate change.

Environment - Materials Science - 30.09.2019
New treatment prevents wildfires
New treatment prevents wildfires
Scientists and engineers worked with state and local agencies to develop and test a long-lasting, environmentally benign fire-retarding material. If used on high-risk areas, the simple, affordable treatment could dramatically cut the number of fires that occur each year. A preventive treatment developed by Stanford researchers could greatly reduce the incidence and severity of wildfires.

Environment - 30.09.2019
How Does Climate Change Affect Mountainous Watersheds That Give Us Our Water?
How Does Climate Change Affect Mountainous Watersheds That Give Us Our Water?
The image of huge chunks of ice breaking away from glaciers and ice sheets, then floating out to sea in Earth's most remote places, may be the most iconic symbol of a warming planet. And while most people will never see these familiar phenomena up close, what's happening within some of the iciest settings still affects people and regions thousands of miles away.

Environment - Materials Science - 30.09.2019
Make like a leaf: researchers developing method to convert CO2
Make like a leaf: researchers developing method to convert CO2
University of Sydney researchers are drawing inspiration from leaves to reduce carbon emissions, using nanotechnology to develop a method for 'carbon photosynthesis' that they hope will one day be adopted on an industrial-scale. Professor Jun Huang from the University of Sydney Nano Institute and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is  developing  a carbon capture method that aims to go one step beyond storage, instead converting and recycling carbon dioxide (CO2) into raw materials that can be used to create fuels and chemicals.

Environment - 27.09.2019
From sink to source: turbulence in water releases hormones from sediment
From sink to source: turbulence in water releases hormones from sediment
Natural, human oestrogens, as well as synthetic substances such as the contraceptive pill, pesticides and industrial chemicals, are transported mainly via our wastewater into surface waters. These so-called hormonally active agents can upset the normal hormone balance of aquatic organisms such as fish, and affect their development, health and reproduction.

Environment - 27.09.2019
Sydney rock oysters adapt to climate change
Sydney rock oysters adapt to climate change
Professor Maria Byrne at University of Sydney and Dr Susan Fitzer at University of Stirling in Scotland have discovered Sydney rock oysters can adapt their shells. Sydney rock oysters selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are able to create their own defences and protect themselves from ocean acidification, according to new research published today in Global Change Biology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.09.2019
Scientists connected fragments of pine savanna and new species keep showing up
Before Europeans arrived in America, longleaf pine savannas sprawled across 90 million acres from present-day Florida to Texas and Virginia. Today, thanks to human impacts, less than 3 percent of that acreage remains, and what's left exists in fragmented patches largely isolated from one another. Yet, hundreds of plant and animals species rely on these savannas, from understory grasses and the gopher tortoise, to the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 26.09.2019
Get ready for more interstellar objects, Yale astronomers say
Get ready for more interstellar objects, Yale astronomers say
Gregory Laughlin and Malena Rice weren't exactly surprised a few weeks ago when they learned that a second interstellar object had made its way into our solar system. The Yale University astronomers had just put the finishing touches on a new study suggesting that these strange, icy visitors from other planets are going to keep right on coming.

Environment - Palaeontology - 26.09.2019
Ecosystems take two million years to recover after mass extinctions
Ecosystems take two million years to recover after mass extinctions
It takes ecosystems two million years to recover after a mass extinction and for them to become functional and resilient again, according to new UCL co-led research. The study Hojung Kim and Dr Sarah Alvarez) and academics from Southampton, Frankfurt and California. The team looked at 13 million years' worth of fossil plankton records in the aftermath of near annihilation of ocean plankton, during the Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction, providing a remarkable glimpse into how the marine ecosystem 'reboots'.

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