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Results 41 - 60 of 522.


Environment - Materials Science - 30.09.2019
Make like a leaf: researchers developing method to convert CO2
Make like a leaf: researchers developing method to convert CO2
University of Sydney researchers are drawing inspiration from leaves to reduce carbon emissions, using nanotechnology to develop a method for 'carbon photosynthesis' that they hope will one day be adopted on an industrial-scale. Professor Jun Huang from the University of Sydney Nano Institute and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is  developing  a carbon capture method that aims to go one step beyond storage, instead converting and recycling carbon dioxide (CO2) into raw materials that can be used to create fuels and chemicals.

Environment - 27.09.2019
From sink to source: turbulence in water releases hormones from sediment
From sink to source: turbulence in water releases hormones from sediment
Natural, human oestrogens, as well as synthetic substances such as the contraceptive pill, pesticides and industrial chemicals, are transported mainly via our wastewater into surface waters. These so-called hormonally active agents can upset the normal hormone balance of aquatic organisms such as fish, and affect their development, health and reproduction.

Environment - 27.09.2019
Sydney rock oysters adapt to climate change
Sydney rock oysters adapt to climate change
Professor Maria Byrne at University of Sydney and Dr Susan Fitzer at University of Stirling in Scotland have discovered Sydney rock oysters can adapt their shells. Sydney rock oysters selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are able to create their own defences and protect themselves from ocean acidification, according to new research published today in Global Change Biology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.09.2019
Scientists connected fragments of pine savanna and new species keep showing up
Before Europeans arrived in America, longleaf pine savannas sprawled across 90 million acres from present-day Florida to Texas and Virginia. Today, thanks to human impacts, less than 3 percent of that acreage remains, and what's left exists in fragmented patches largely isolated from one another. Yet, hundreds of plant and animals species rely on these savannas, from understory grasses and the gopher tortoise, to the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 26.09.2019
Get ready for more interstellar objects, Yale astronomers say
Get ready for more interstellar objects, Yale astronomers say
Gregory Laughlin and Malena Rice weren't exactly surprised a few weeks ago when they learned that a second interstellar object had made its way into our solar system. The Yale University astronomers had just put the finishing touches on a new study suggesting that these strange, icy visitors from other planets are going to keep right on coming.

Environment - Palaeontology - 26.09.2019
Ecosystems take two million years to recover after mass extinctions
Ecosystems take two million years to recover after mass extinctions
It takes ecosystems two million years to recover after a mass extinction and for them to become functional and resilient again, according to new UCL co-led research. The study Hojung Kim and Dr Sarah Alvarez) and academics from Southampton, Frankfurt and California. The team looked at 13 million years' worth of fossil plankton records in the aftermath of near annihilation of ocean plankton, during the Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction, providing a remarkable glimpse into how the marine ecosystem 'reboots'.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 24.09.2019
'Treasure trove' of quake clues could be unearthed by wavy new technique
’Treasure trove’ of quake clues could be unearthed by wavy new technique
Imperial geologists have improved the mapping of underwater rocks, which could lead to better understanding of earthquakes and tsunami hazards. Their technique combines traditional acoustic mapping with a newer method called 2D waveform inversion. This enhanced their view of rocks along a fault line - a break in the Earth's crust - off the east coast of New Zealand's North Island.

Health - Environment - 24.09.2019
First known cases of sudden oak death detected in Del Norte County
Two tanoak trees in Del Norte county tested positive for the pathogen known to cause sudden oak death, reports a team of collaborators from Cal Fire, UC Cooperative Extension and SOD Blitz. (UC Berkeley photo courtesy Matteo Garbelotto) A team of collaborators including the citizen science project SOD Blitz have detected the first cases of the infectious tree-killing pathogen  Phytophthora ramorum in California's Del Norte county.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.09.2019
What wolves’ teeth reveal about their lives
UCLA evolutionary biologist Blaire Van Valkenburgh has spent more than three decades studying the skulls of many species of large carnivores — including wolves, lions and tigers — that lived from 50,000 years ago to the present. She reports today in the journal eLife the answer to a puzzling question.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.09.2019
New satellite looking at how Earth is losing its cool gets the go-ahead
New satellite looking at how Earth is losing its cool gets the go-ahead
A satellite that will measure Earth's energy budget, helping to improve climate change predictions, has been selected as a future mission by ESA. FORUM (Far-infrared Outgoing Radiation Understanding and Monitoring) will measure radiation emitted by Earth into space. This will provide new insight into the planet's energy budget - how much energy it receives from the Sun, how much it retains, and how much it remits to space.

Environment - 24.09.2019
A new satellite to understand how Earth is losing its cool
Following a rigorous selection process, ESA has selected a new satellite mission to fill in a critical missing piece of the climate jigsaw. By measuring radiation emitted by Earth into space, FORUM will provide new insight into the planet's radiation budget and how it is controlled. The Far-infrared Outgoing Radiation Understanding and Monitoring (FORUM) mission was one of two concepts competing to be ESA's ninth Earth Explorer mission.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 24.09.2019
Lead found in turmeric
Some spice processors in Bangladesh use an industrial lead chromate pigment to imbue turmeric with a bright yellow color prized for curries and other traditional dishes, elevating blood lead levels in Bangladeshis. It's billed as a health booster and healing agent, but it may be the source of cognitive defects and other severe ailments.

Environment - 24.09.2019
Ensuring coastal resilience for the Bahamas
Ensuring coastal resilience for the Bahamas
A new Stanford-led study provides information on how to invest in natural coastal ecosystems that the Bahamian government, community leaders and development banks are applying in post-disaster recovery and future storm preparation in the Bahamas. As new hurricanes gain strength in the Atlantic, residents of the Bahamas have barely begun recovering from destroyed villages and flooded streets brought by Hurricane Dorian's battering this month.

Environment - 24.09.2019
Better working environment in road construction
Better working environment in road construction
Brooding heat, hot fumes and noisy machines - asphalting roads is hard work. Empa researchers have analysed whether and how much harmful emissions are produced when regular "hot asphalt" or so-called warm asphalt is laid. The result: the more ecological warm asphalt also outperforms the conventional method in terms of emissions.

Environment - 24.09.2019
Achieving environmental sustainability seen as coming at a cost
International research has shown that most people believe achieving environmental sustainability could hamper improvements to quality of life. Dr Charlie Crimston from UQ's School of Psychology said the study indicated that convincing people about our realistic prospects of creating a more environmentally, economically and socially sustainable world may be a major challenge.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.09.2019
Astonishing diversity of sticklebacks discovered in Lake Constance
Astonishing diversity of sticklebacks discovered in Lake Constance
Most recreational fishermen do not take notice of the little threespine stickleback fish - it is too small and spiny to make a good meal. In Lake Constance however, the professional fishermen involuntarily became acquainted with it a few years ago. That's because the stickleback population has exploded in the lake, resulting in half of the fish biomass belonging to this species and them often clogging the fishermen's gill nets.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 23.09.2019
UCL to form closer ties with the European Space Agency
A memorandum of collaboration to be agreed by UCL and the European Space Agency (ESA) is one of the most comprehensive to date between ESA and a university and builds on existing close co-operation on missions to study space weather and other phenomena in space. The memorandum, due to be signed by Jan Woerner, Director General of ESA, and David Price, UCL Vice-Provost (Research), will cover a swathe of topics ranging from planetary science to space policy, governance and security.

Environment - 23.09.2019
Los Alamos team sets sail for Arctic on year-long research expedition
Los Alamos team sets sail for Arctic on year-long research expedition
As part of MOSAiC field campaign, environmental researchers will operate a suite of instruments 24/7 as ship drifts in ice for the winter The data collected has the potential to transform our understanding of the way the Arctic is responding to climate change-so important to improving our ability to predict global climate impacts of a rapidly changing Arctic environment.

Environment - 23.09.2019
Daylight levels affect our thermal perception
Daylight levels affect our thermal perception
A pioneering study carried out at EPFL shows that the amount of daylight in a room can influence our thermal comfort and how well we tolerate heat or cold. The findings could be used to improve existing building standards and decrease energy consumption.  The difference between reality and our perception of reality has long intrigued Western philosophers.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.09.2019
Origin of the diversity of sticklebacks in Lake Constance deciphered
Origin of the diversity of sticklebacks in Lake Constance deciphered
Most recreational fishermen do not take notice of the little threespine stickleback fish - it is too small and spiny to make a good meal. In Lake Constance however, the professional fishermen involuntarily became acquainted with it a few years ago. That's because the stickleback population has exploded in the lake, resulting in half of the fish biomass belonging to this species and them often clogging the fishermen's gill nets.

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