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Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 04.02.2019
Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Much of the surface ocean will shift in color by end of 21st century
Climate-driven changes in phytoplankton communities will intensify the blue and green regions of the world's oceans. Climate change is causing significant changes to phytoplankton in the world's oceans, and a new MIT study finds that over the coming decades these changes will affect the ocean's color, intensifying its blue regions and its green ones.

Environment - 04.02.2019
Global well-being in coming decades hinges on non-material factors
To improve people's well-being as much as possible in coming decades, policy makers should look beyond narrow economic calculations and prioritize non-material factors when making big decisions. That's the takeaway from a study, published Jan. 11 , which draws on global well-being surveys over the past decade to project potential levels of world happiness in 2050.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.02.2019
Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony
The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories (UKOTs), is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found. The findings provide fresh evidence of the fragility of marine ecosystems and lend weight to the scientific case for creating the Ascension Island Ocean Sanctuary (AIOS), set to be one of the largest fully protected reserves in the Atlantic Ocean.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.02.2019
How plants cope with iron deficiency: Botany
How plants cope with iron deficiency: Botany
Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, animals and also for humans. It is needed for a diverse range of metabolic processes, for example for photosynthesis and for respiration. If a person is lacking iron, this leads to a major negative impact on health. Millions of people around the globe suffer from iron deficiency each year.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.02.2019
Evolution, illustrated
What do you get when you put together several tons of steel plates, hundreds of mice, a few evolutionary and molecular biologists and a tiny Nebraska town near the South Dakota border? Would you believe one of the most complete pictures ever of vertebrate evolution? Led by Rowan Barrett, Canada Research Chair in Biodiversity Science at McGill University and Hopi Hoekstra, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular and Cellula

Health - Environment - 31.01.2019
Scientifically Proven: Air Pollution Harms Health
Scientifically Proven: Air Pollution Harms Health
The debate on air quality standards for ambient air pollutants such as nitrogen oxide, particulate matter and ozone has revived in Germany last week. The International Society for Environmental Epidemiology and the Environment and Health Committee of the European Respiratory Society have now issued a statement on the debate of the effects of air pollution on health.

Environment - 31.01.2019
Researchers solve the riddle of our most unique fish
Researchers solve the riddle of our most unique fish
A great mystery around one of our most unique fish species has been solved by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU). Scientists knew Lungfish shared some traits with humans - such as the ability to breathe air through lungs - but a new study proves they also have a similar life span, potentially up to 80 years.

Environment - 31.01.2019
Monitoring gas dynamics in a deep geological repository
Monitoring gas dynamics in a deep geological repository
The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, lying to the north of Saint-Ursanne in the canton of Jura, is located at a depth of around 300 metres underground. At this site, various long-term experiments are being carried out as part of efforts to develop an operating plan for the safe disposal of radioactive waste.

Environment - 30.01.2019
Extreme rainfall events are connected across the world
Extreme rainfall events are connected across the world
An analysis of satellite data has revealed global patterns of extreme rainfall, which could lead to better forecasts and more accurate climate models. Extreme rainfall - defined as the top five percent of rainy days - often forms a pattern at the local level, for example tracking across Europe. But new research reveals that there are also larger-scale global patterns to extreme rainfall events.

Health - Environment - 30.01.2019
Into age-related eye disease to investigate genetic risk factors
Over 60s residents of an East Yorkshire town are being offered the chance to play an important role in the future development of personalised treatments for age-related eye disease. The Bridlington Eye Assessment Project (BEAP), led by The University of Nottingham, is appealing for people to take part in research that aims to more accurately predict how many patients are likely to be affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and those who are at a greater risk due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.01.2019
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution
A genetic analysis of sticklebacks shows that isolated populations in similar environments develop in comparable ways. The basis for this is already present in the genome of their genetic ancestors. Evolutionary biologists from the University of Basel and the University of Nottingham report these insights in the journal Evolution Letters.

Environment - 28.01.2019
Space technology predicts droughts several months in advance
Scientists from ANU have used new space technology to predict droughts and increased bushfire risk up to five months in advance. ANU researcher Siyuan Tian said the team knew they needed to move into space to get closer to understanding the complex nature of drought. They used data from multiple satellites to measure water below the Earth's surface with unprecedented precision, and were able to relate this to drought impacts on the vegetation several months later.

Environment - Transport - 28.01.2019
Emissions targets for transport sector can’t be met using natural gas alone
Using natural gas fuel with other methods could help road freight and shipping industries meet targets, says new Imperial College London white paper. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) - the United Nations' organisation for shipping - seeks to at least halve greenhouse gas emissions from ships by 2050 compared to 2008 levels.

Environment - 28.01.2019
Four Burning Questions for Harriet Kuhnlein, Professor Emerita, Commissioner, Lancet Report on Obesity
The Lancet commission on Obesity published a report today on the joint pandemics of obesity, undernutrition, and climate change. In the report, the commissioners point to the fact that malnutrition in all its forms, including undernutrition and obesity, is by far the biggest cause of ill-health and premature death globally.

Environment - 25.01.2019
Inequality promotes deforestation in Latin America
Inequality promotes deforestation in Latin America
Agricultural expansion is the main cause of deforestation in Latin America. Improvements in agricultural productivity can either enable forest conservation, or promote more deforestation. A new University of Bern study highlights the role played by inequality: high inequality leads to more deforestation, while lower inequality improves the long-term protection of remaining tropical forests.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.01.2019
'Noisy' gene atlas to help explain how plants survive environmental change
’Noisy’ gene atlas to help explain how plants survive environmental change
As parents of identical twins will tell you, they are never actually identical, even though they have the same genes. This is also true in the plant world. Now, new research by the University of Cambridge is helping to explain why 'twin' plants, with identical genes, grown in identical environments continue to display unique characteristics all of their own.

Environment - 25.01.2019
Eating Out, Breathing In
Researchers find exhaust from restaurants contribute significantly to air pollution Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University recently followed their noses to test how much air pollution comes from restaurants. "Restaurant food-cooking emissions are a major, if not the major, driver of spatial variability of organic aerosol," said Ellis Robinson, a postdoctoral researcher at Carnegie Mellon's Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies (CAPS).

Environment - 24.01.2019
Web application helps urban planners design cities
EPFL researchers have developed a web-based software program that takes a whole new approach to urban planning. Planners simply enter the various objectives they want to achieve - in terms of built density, quality of life, cost, use of renewable energy, etc. and the program generates the best possible variants for their city.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.01.2019
It’s a bird-eat-bird world
Baby birds and eggs are on the menu for at least 94 species of animals in Australia's forests and woodlands, according to new research from The University of Queensland. PhD candidate Graham Fulton reviewed 177 existing bird studies across the country, identifying Australia's most prolific nest predators and the factors affecting nest attacks.

Environment - Business / Economics - 23.01.2019
The double-edged sword of palm oil
Researchers have found strong evidence that oil palm production gains in Cameroon are coming from extensification instead of intensification. Possible solutions for reversing the trend include improving crop and processing yields by using more high-yielding seed types, replanting old plantations and upgrading milling technologies.
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