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Results 61 - 80 of 523.


Life Sciences - Environment - 23.09.2019
Origin of the diversity of sticklebacks in Lake Constance deciphered
Origin of the diversity of sticklebacks in Lake Constance deciphered
Most recreational fishermen do not take notice of the little threespine stickleback fish - it is too small and spiny to make a good meal. In Lake Constance however, the professional fishermen involuntarily became acquainted with it a few years ago. That's because the stickleback population has exploded in the lake, resulting in half of the fish biomass belonging to this species and them often clogging the fishermen's gill nets.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 20.09.2019
Opinion: Five climate change science misconceptions - debunked
Professor Mark Maslin (UCL Geography) writes about common climate change myths and explains how each can be disproven. The science of climate change is more than 150 years old and it is probably the most tested area of modern science. However the energy industry, political lobbyists and others have spent the last 30 years sowing doubt about the science where none really exists.

Health - Environment - 20.09.2019
Sustainable growth and energy insights: News from the College
Sustainable growth and energy insights: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From new models of Brazilian investment without ecological destruction, to fresh insights into photosynthesis, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Brazil's (and the world's) climate conundrum As one of the world's ten largest economies, Brazil has the potential for a unique model of economic progress.

Environment - 20.09.2019
Preventing climate change cheaper than dealing with its damage
Preventing climate change cheaper than dealing with its damage
World leaders need to urgently accelerate efforts to prevent “profound, if not catastrophic” climate change in future, a distinguished group of scientists has warned. According to their new study published in Science today, acting to reduce climate change would cost much less than repairing the damage it would inflict in coming decades on people, infrastructure and ecosystems.

Environment - Social Sciences - 19.09.2019
How can more walking be encouraged in cities?
A report investigating travel habits in seven European cities reveals environmental and social drivers that make people choose to walk. The new research reveals these include social factors such as how safe people feel and how concerned they are about air pollution, and urban design, such as how connected streets are and how close people are to public transport links.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 19.09.2019
Opinion: How we detected water on a potentially habitable exoplanet for the first time
Angelos Tsiaras (UCL Physics & Astronomy) writes about the methods used to discover water vapour in the atmosphere of K2-18 b, the first potentially habitable planet outside of our solar system. With more than 4,000 exoplanets - planets orbiting stars other than our sun - discovered so far, it may seem like we are on the cusp of finding out whether we are alone in the universe.

Environment - 19.09.2019
Coastal communities highly threatened by rising sea-levels, even with climate change mitigation
An international group of scientists have urgently called on world leaders to accelerate efforts to tackle climate change. Almost every aspect of the planet's environment and ecology is undergoing changes as a result of climate change, some of which are profound if not catastrophic for the future. Rising sea-levels is one of the biggest threats.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.09.2019
Dry run for cropping systems
Dry run for cropping systems
Globe magazine , News By: Michael Keller To safeguard the long-term future of agricultural production in Switzerland, ETH and Agroscope are investigating how resistant the country's crop­ping systems are to drought. The heatwave of 2018 was yet another warning to both farmers and the public on the effects of climate change: in the future, Switzerland will see less and less rain during the summer months.

Environment - Social Sciences - 19.09.2019
Wilderness areas halve extinction risk
The global conservation community has been urged to adopt a specific target to protect the world's remaining wilderness areas to prevent large scale loss of at-risk species. A University of Queensland and CSIRO study has found that wilderness areas - where human impact is minimal or absent - halves the global risk of species extinction.

Environment - 18.09.2019
Shifting the focus of climate-change strategies may benefit younger generations
Strategies to limit climate change that focus on warming in the next couple of decades would leave less of a burden for future generations. Research led by Imperial College London and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Austria, suggests a new underpinning logic for strategies that seek to limit climate change.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 18.09.2019
Dust from a giant asteroid crash caused an ancient ice age
About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze. The seas began to ice over at the Earth's poles, and the new range of temperatures around the planet set the stage for a boom of new species. The cause of this ice age was a mystery, until now: a new study by a group of scientists including a University of Chicago professor argues that the ice age was caused by global cooling, triggered by extra dust in the atmosphere from a giant asteroid collision in outer space.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.09.2019
William Meadow, pioneer in neonatal intensive care and medical ethics, 1948-2019
About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze. The seas began to ice over at the Earth's poles, and the new range of temperatures around the planet set the stage for a boom of new species. The cause of this ice age was a mystery, until now: a new study by a group of scientists including a University of Chicago professor argues that the ice age was caused by global cooling, triggered by extra dust in the atmosphere from a giant asteroid collision in outer space.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.09.2019
Identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
A new study, including scientists from Cardiff University and published today , discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories. If you walk from a river's source to its mouth, you walk a path that descends in elevation. In some rivers, this path will descend steeply out of the uplands, and then flatten out in the lowlands.

Environment - 17.09.2019
Wood that shapes itself
Wood that shapes itself
Researchers from ETH Zurich, Empa and the University of Stuttgart have developed a new technique involving a controlled drying process that makes wooden panels bend into a pre-set shape without the use of any mechanical force. Wood is a renewable resource and a popular, sustainable construction material.

Environment - 17.09.2019
Montreal Protocol prevents depletion of ozone layer, but
Montreal Protocol prevents depletion of ozone layer, but
The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, which celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2017, was the first UN multilateral environmental agreement to be universally ratified (197 Parties by 2008). The aim of this treaty is to protect the stratospheric ozone layer - essential for life on Earth - by phasing out the production and controlling emissions of ozone-depleting substances (chlorofluorocarbons, CFCs).

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.09.2019
Identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and published , discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories. For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence.

Environment - 16.09.2019
Atlantic Ocean may get a jump start from the other side of the world
A key question for climate scientists in recent years has been whether the Atlantic Ocean's main circulation system is slowing down, a development that could have dramatic consequences for Europe and other parts of the Atlantic rim. But a new study suggests help may be on the way from an unexpected source - the Indian Ocean.

Chemistry - Environment - 16.09.2019
Catalyst opens way to sustainable fuels from carbon dioxide
Catalyst opens way to sustainable fuels from carbon dioxide
A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device. If the idea of flying on battery-powered commercial jets makes you nervous, you can relax a little. Researchers have discovered a practical starting point for converting carbon dioxide into sustainable liquid fuels, including fuels for heavier modes of transportation that may prove very difficult to electrify, like airplanes, ships and freight trains.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.09.2019
Yearly snapshot of Saturn helps astronomers monitor the ringed world
Yearly snapshot of Saturn helps astronomers monitor the ringed world
The Hubble Space Telescope's annual snapshot of Saturn reveals a turbulent, dynamic atmosphere with small storms popping into view as others disappear, all framed by the planet's bright, icy rings. Analyzed by Mike Wong of UC Berkeley and Amy Simon of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Hubble portrait is part of a yearly campaign to record the giant planets in the solar system - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune - to track shifting weather patterns and discover new phenomena.

Electroengineering - Environment - 12.09.2019
Low-cost device generates electricity using natural cooling phenomenon
When frost forms on the ground overnight even when temperatures are well above freezing, or water droplets appear on car windshields even on a clear night, the cause is often a phenomenon called radiative sky cooling. In a paper published in the journal Joule, researchers led by a UCLA materials scientist report that they have leveraged the principles behind radiative sky cooling to develop an innovative way to produce renewable energy at night.

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