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Environment - Life Sciences - 14.11.2019
Evolution can reconfigure gene networks to deal with environmental change
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have unravelled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas' ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes. By mapping networks of genes to the physiological responses of ancient and modern waterfleas (Daphnia), the researchers, based in the University's School of Biosciences , were able to show that a cluster of over 800 genes, many of them involved in metabolic processes, evolved to become "plastic", or flexible.

Environment - 14.11.2019
Rubber in the environment
Rubber in the environment
The tread on the tyre is worn out, new tyres are needed. Everyday life for many drivers. But where do these lost centimetres of tyre tread "disappear" to? As micro-rubbers, they mainly end up in soil and water and, to a small extent, in the air. And the amount of these particles in our environment is anything but small, as Empa researchers have now calculated.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.11.2019
How Multiple Factors of Global Change Affect Soil
Prospective Students Students and Doctorate Alumni and Supporters Continuing Education Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin study effects of multiple global change factors / Findings published in latest issue of "Science" No 343/2019 from Nov 14, 2019 A team of ecologists at Freie Universität Berlin studied soil and how it was affected by multiple factors of global change.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.11.2019
Large storage potential in future ice-free glacier basins
Large storage potential in future ice-free glacier basins
Glaciologists at ETH Zurich and WSL assessed the global water storage and hydropower potential that could be freed up in future as glaciers melt in response to climate change. Global warming will cause substantial glacier retreat for the majority of the world's glaciers over the next few decades. This will not only spell the end for some magnificent natural monuments, but also importantly affect the water cycle.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.11.2019
Climate Change Expected to Shift Location of East Asian Monsoons
Climate Change Expected to Shift Location of East Asian Monsoons
New Berkeley Lab study finds warming climate could lead to profound changes in the subtropical climate More than a billion people in Asia depend on seasonal monsoons for their water needs. The Asian monsoon is closely linked to a planetary-scale tropical air flow which, according to a new study by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), will most likely shift geographically as the climate continues to warm, resulting in less rainfall in certain regions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 13.11.2019
Opportunity makes species
Opportunity makes species
"The people who live around the Eqaluit River in the south-west of Greenland do know that there are char living in the river and its lakes", explains the evolutionary and fish biologist Carmela Dönz. "But they prefer to eat sea fish and take very little notice of the fish stocks in fresh water - which is one of the reasons why the fish appear to have little fear of people." Outside the region, the rivers and lakes along the coastline created by the retreating Greenland glaciers after the last ice age remain largely unknown.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.11.2019
Stalled weather patterns will get bigger due to climate change
Stalled weather patterns will get bigger due to climate change
Rice-led study uncovers relationship between jet stream, atmospheric blocking events Climate change will increase the size of stalled high-pressure weather systems called "blocking events” that have already produced some of the 21st century's deadliest heat waves, according to a Rice University study.

Environment - 12.11.2019
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. This unprecedented loss of biodiversity threatens valuable ecosystems and human well-being. But what is holding us back from putting conservation research into practice? The journal Biological Conservation has published a collection of 14 articles on this topic.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.11.2019
Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up
Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up
As bacteria adapt to hotter temperatures, they speed up their respiration rate and release more carbon, potentially accelerating climate change. By releasing more carbon as global temperatures rise, bacteria and related organisms called archaea could increase climate warming at a faster rate than current models suggest.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.11.2019
Parker Solar Probe Data Released to the Public
Parker Solar Probe Data Released to the Public
Scientific data taken by the Parker Solar Probe are set to be released to the public on Nov 12. The data files being released contain measurements that were taken closer to the Sun than ever before. These unprecedented data promise to revolutionize our understanding of how the solar corona and solar wind work.

Environment - Chemistry - 11.11.2019
Nitrous oxide emissions set to rise in the Pacific Ocean
Nitrous oxide emissions set to rise in the Pacific Ocean
The acidification of the Pacific Ocean in northern Japan is increasing the natural production rate of N2O, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. That's the finding of a study carried out jointly by scientists at EPFL, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology and appearing recently.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.11.2019
"Without Bacteria and Fungi, the Earth Would Look Like Mars"
Our soils filter drinking water and produces food. Soils only carry out these services, because they harbour thousands fungal and bacteria species which work together like the wheels in a clock mechanism. These are the conclusions reached by a study published in the renowned by researchers from Agroscope and the University of Zurich.

Environment - 08.11.2019
Ten Years of Research Through the Resnick Sustainability Institute
WATER RESOURCES Gathering data to prepare California for droughts: California's extensive reservoir system needs to adapt to precipitation levels that are growing less predictable. Data can help, says a Resnick-supported fellow who has created the first empirical statewide model of the California reservoir network.

Environment - Business / Economics - 07.11.2019
Capturing carbon dioxide to make useful products could become big business
Capturing carbon dioxide to make useful products could become big business
Waste carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels could be used to make valuable products such as plastics, fuels and cement, suggests new research. If done correctly, using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) to make useful products would also help offset the costs of mitigating climate change, argue scientists in a review .

Environment - Business / Economics - 06.11.2019
Distributed Solar Prices Fall Annually by 5% to 7%
Distributed Solar Prices Fall Annually by 5% to 7%
Berkeley Lab's Tracking the Sun report details the latest pricing and technology trends for distributed solar systems The latest edition of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) annual Tracking the Sun report finds that prices for distributed solar power systems continued to fall in 2018, that industry practices continued to evolve, and that systems are getting bigger and more efficient.

Environment - 06.11.2019
Wasps as an effective pest control for agriculture
Common wasp species could be valuable at sustainably managing crop pests, finds a new UCL-led experimental study in Brazil. The study, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , found that social wasps are effective predators that can manage pests on two high-value crops, maize and sugarcane.

Environment - Chemistry - 05.11.2019
Deep sea vents had ideal conditions for origin of life
By creating protocells in hot, alkaline seawater, a UCL-led research team has added to evidence that the origin of life could have been in deep-sea hydrothermal vents rather than shallow pools. Previous experiments had failed to foster the formation of protocells - seen as a key stepping stone to the development of cell-based life - in such environments, but the new study, published in  Nature Ecology & Evolution , finds that heat and alkalinity might not just be acceptable, but necessary to get life started.

Environment - 05.11.2019
Satellite tracking shows how ships affect clouds and climate
Satellite tracking shows how ships affect clouds and climate
By matching the movement of ships to the changes in clouds caused by their emissions, researchers have shown how strongly the two are connected. When ships burn fossil fuels, they release airborne particles containing various naturally occurring chemicals, including sulphur. These particles are known to modify certain types of clouds, which can affect climate.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.11.2019
Swordfish as oceanographers? Satellite tags allow research of ocean's 'twilight zone' off Florida
Swordfish as oceanographers? Satellite tags allow research of ocean’s ’twilight zone’ off Florida
Researchers from the University of Washington are using high-tech tags to record the movements of swordfish - big, deep-water, migratory, open-ocean fish that are poorly studied - and get a window into the ocean depths they inhabit. The researchers tagged five swordfish in late August off the coast of Miami: Max , Simone , Anthony , Rex and Oliver.

Environment - 01.11.2019
Palestinian farmers benefit from Birmingham water technology project
Palestinian farmers benefit from Birmingham water technology project
University of Birmingham scientists have worked with international students to produce prototype desalination equipment that could help Palestinian farmers avoid water shortages and grow crops efficiently. The equipment is built from off-the-shelf parts and could be deployed easily and relatively cheaply across the Middle East.

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