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Astronomy / Space Science - Event - 10.10.2019
This Nobel Prize makes EPFL's astrophysicists proud
This Nobel Prize makes EPFL's astrophysicists proud
In 2002, EPFL awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa to Michel Mayor, an astronomer at the University of Geneva, for discovering the first exoplanet. This past Tuesday, Mayor, along with colleague Didier Quéloz and the American scientist James Peebles, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Transport - Event - 07.10.2019
Imperial academics discuss air quality with Government's Transport department
Imperial academics discuss air quality with Government’s Transport department
Imperial academics presented their research on air quality and emissions to the Government's Department for Transport. The event was organised jointly as part of the department 's learning and development series, and The Forum , Imperial's policy engagement programme. Dr Audrey de Nazelle , from Imperial's Centre for Environmental Policy, and Dr Marc Stettler , at the Centre for Transport Studies, led the event alongside the Department for Transport's Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor Phil Blythe.

Transport - Event - 07.10.2019
UK needs 'joined-up health and transport policy', academics tell Government
UK needs ’joined-up health and transport policy’, academics tell Government
Imperial academics presented their research on air quality and emissions to the Government's Department for Transport. The event was organised jointly as part of the department 's learning and development series, and The Forum , Imperial's policy engagement programme. Dr Audrey de Nazelle , from Imperial's Centre for Environmental Policy, and Dr Marc Stettler , at the Centre for Transport Studies, led the event alongside the Department for Transport's Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor Phil Blythe.

Event - Life Sciences - 27.06.2019
Conversation boosts women’s participation at scientific meetings
Not only are women underrepresented at scientific meetings, they participate less than men in question-and-answer sessions, self-limiting their involvement and participation. But a public discussion of the problem helps. Recently, some prominent men in science have publicly declared they wouldn't attend scientific meetings that don't adequately represent women, but a new study suggests the problem isn't just representation - women also don't participate at the same level as men, even when they are well represented.

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