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Health - Pharmacology - 28.01.2019
Hepatitis C programmes could save 1.5 million deaths by 2030
Hepatitis C programmes could save 1.5 million deaths by 2030
Imperial scientists have published the first global estimates to determine the impact of improved prevention, diagnosis and treatment for hepatitis C. A comprehensive package of prevention, screening, and treatment interventions could avert 15.1 million new hepatitis C infections and 1.5 million cirrhosis and liver cancer deaths globally by 2030 - equal to an 81% reduction in incidence and a 61% reduction in deaths compared with 2015, according to the first study to model hepatitis C interventions globally published in The Lancet.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2019
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
Cancer: A mutation that breaks gene interplay in 3D
EPFL scientists have discovered how a mutated gene can affect the three-dimensional interactions of genes in the cell, leading to various forms of cancer. Inside the cell, DNA is tightly wrapped around proteins and packed in a complex, 3D structure that we call "chromatin". Chromatin not only protects our genetic material from damage, but also organizes the entire genome by regulating the expression of genes in three dimensions, unwinding them to be presented to the cell's gene-expression machinery and then winding them back in.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
A solid scaffolding for our cells
A solid scaffolding for our cells
UNIGE researchers have discovered the fundamental role of the Not1 protein, which allows proteins to find each other and assemble at a precise pace, in the right place and at the right time. To perform properly the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines".

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
"Stop, do not eat fat anymore!"
During fat ingestion , if everything works in our body, an enzyme from the intestine transmits to the brain (through the production of molecules) the message "stop, I am not hungry anymore". This gut-brain axis maintains a balanced food intake. Researchers from the UCLouvain were able to target this enzyme.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
Whopping big viruses prey on human gut bacteria
Viruses plague bacteria just as viruses like influenza plague humans. Some of the largest of these so-called bacteriophages have now been found in the human gut, where they periodically devastate bacteria just as seasonal outbreaks of flu lay humans low, according to a new study led by UC Berkeley scientists.

Social Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
Even a one-hour 'planting party' can lift spirits, build skills among women in prison
Even a one-hour ’planting party’ can lift spirits, build skills among women in prison
Both the study's idea and its outcomes were straightforward: Organize a short houseplant-potting workshop for incarcerated women and see if it improved their moods. The answer was yes - a finding reported in December 2018 in the International Journal of Prisoner Health. But what is more nuanced, the study's lead author says, are the lessons we can extrapolate from what otherwise may seem like a simple, one-off event.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.01.2019
Phone or video call therapy improves health anxiety and saves money
A new study by mental health experts has found that easy-access, remotely-delivered psychological treatment can significantly reduce extreme health anxiety in people who repeatedly go to the doctor, or hospital emergency departments.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
Sleep loss heightens pain sensitivity, dulls brain's painkilling response
Sleep loss heightens pain sensitivity, dulls brain’s painkilling response
When we're in pain, we have a hard time sleeping. But how does poor sleep affect pain? For the first time, UC Berkeley scientists have answered that question by identifying neural glitches in the sleep-deprived brain that can intensify and prolong the agony of sickness and injury. Their findings, published Jan.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
How the Body Fights Cancer and Intruders
How the Body Fights Cancer and Intruders
The human body's immune system is like a vast team of special agents. Certain cells called T cells each individually specialize in recognizing a particular intruder, such as the influenza virus or salmonella. Determining a given T cell's target is a critical step in designing personalized treatments for cancers and developing vaccines.

Physics - Health - 28.01.2019
16 Elements: Berkeley Lab's Contributions to the Periodic Table
16 Elements: Berkeley Lab’s Contributions to the Periodic Table
In celebration of the 150th anniversary of the periodic table, a look at how far it's come and where it's headed. A century ago, the periodic table looked much different than it does today. It had empty spots for elements that had not yet been found, and ended at uranium (element 92), the heaviest known element until 1940.

Pharmacology - Health - 28.01.2019
Leading climate change scientist outlines effects of increasing global temperatures on Birmingham and the rest of the world
The deaths of thousands of women from bleeding after childbirth could be prevented by a new drug which does not need to be stored in a refrigerator, according to research conducted in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. Led by the World Health Organisation (WHO) , the study found the 'heat stable' drug, called carbetocin, is as effective at preventing haemorrhaging as oxytocin - the medication which is the first choice treatment in countries such as the UK.

Pharmacology - Health - 28.01.2019
Helping kids manage side effects of allergy treatments
Stanford psychologists find that a positive mindset can make children less anxious about mild but uncomfortable symptoms that arise during treatment for peanut allergies. For children undergoing immunotherapy - a promising treatment for peanut allergies - uncomfortable side effects can induce anxiety, perhaps to the point of skipping doses or dropping treatment entirely.

Earth Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
New method to determine how safe buildings are after an earthquake
New method to determine how safe buildings are after an earthquake
EPFL scientists have developed a new method for evaluating building safety after an earthquake, helping residents return to their homes more quickly. Deciding when it's safe for a building's residents to move back in after an earthquake is a major challenge and responsibility for civil engineers. Not only do they have to evaluate whether the building could collapse, but also whether it could withstand aftershocks of the same magnitude.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2019
Genetically sequencing DNA could yield patient care insights
Increasingly, the words "genetics" and "genome" are making their way into news stories about health and medicine. Doctors talk about scientific research-how there may be links between gene mutations in your DNA and an increased risk of cancer or heart disease-but it all seems far away, like something that's not quite connected to your own health and well-being right now.

Health - Computer Science - 25.01.2019
Filling the gaps in a patient's medical data
Filling the gaps in a patient’s medical data
Neural network assimilates multiple types of health data to help doctors make decisions with incomplete information. MIT researchers have developed a model that can assimilate multiple types of a patient's health data to help doctors make decisions with incomplete information. The field of "predictive analytics" holds promise for many health care applications.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.01.2019
Revolutionising the way manufacturing is done
A research paper showing the results of a study led by researchers at the University of Birmingham has been crowned 'UK Research Paper of the Year' in The BMJ Awards 2018. The paper, published in The BMJ last October, described the results of the BUMPES trial which aimed to investigate the most ideal position a first-time mother with a low dose epidural should adopt to increase the chance of a birth without interventions such as forceps or a Caesarean.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.01.2019
Promising results in the fight against Ebola
Promising results in the fight against Ebola
A Phase 1 clinical trial to test the safety of an antibody to use against Ebola outbreak has been successfully concluded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland (U.S.A.).

Life Sciences - Health - 24.01.2019
Slim people have a genetic advantage when it comes to maintaining their weight
Slim people have a genetic advantage when it comes to maintaining their weight
In the largest study of its kind to date, Cambridge researchers have looked at why some people manage to stay thin while others gain weight easily. They have found that the genetic dice are loaded in favour of thin people and against those at the obese end of the spectrum. It's easy to rush to judgement and criticise people for their weight, but the science shows that things are far more complex Sadaf Farooqi More than six in ten adults in the UK are overweight, and one in four adults is obese.

Health - Art and Design - 24.01.2019
Increasing murder rate is erasing gains in life expectancy among Mexican men, UCLA research reports
Increasing murder rate is erasing gains in life expectancy among Mexican men, UCLA research reports
The murder rate in Mexico increased so dramatically between 2005 and 2015 that it partially offset expected gains in life expectancy among men there, according to a new study by a UCLA public health researcher. "It's common to see news reports about the toll that drugand gang-related murders are taking in Mexico," said Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, co-author of the study and associate professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

Health - 24.01.2019
Sea air helps against cancer and cholesterol
Sea air helps against cancer and cholesterol
Breathing in sea air helps to beat cancer and to prevent a high cholesterol, research shows by Ghent University and the Flanders Marine Institute. Have you ever heard of sea spray? That's what researchers call vaporized sea water in the air. Sea spray contains natural substances produced by algae and bacteria, which are good for your health.