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Health - Pharmacology - 24.01.2019
New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs
New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs
Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a "master regulator" of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals. As reported , a global research team led by the University of Bristol studied how the activity of the enzyme GSK3 (Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3) affects the function of podocyte cells, which are crucial in enabling the kidneys to filter blood.

Health - 24.01.2019
Vegetable and fish diet linked to lower high blood pressure risk in pregnancy
A diet rich in vegetables and fish is associated with a lower risk of developing high blood pressure, and a related condition known as pre-eclampsia. These findings were suggested in a large study published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics. The results also show that a Western diet - high in potatoes, meat, white bread and margarine - increase the odds of developing these conditions during pregnancy.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.01.2019
Needle and syringe programmes are highly cost-effective at preventing hepatitis C transmission
Needle and syringe programmes are highly cost-effective at preventing hepatitis C transmission
Providing clean injecting equipment through needle and syringe programmes is a highly cost-effective way of preventing hepatitis C (HCV) transmission among people who inject drugs and could save millions of pounds in infection treatment costs in the UK, according to research led by the University of Bristol and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.01.2019
Canada, EU, and Africa combine to allow researchers to analyze health data on the largest, most diverse scale
A patient develops a rare condition and needs answers, so their clinician searches frantically to find patients with similar, rare, symptoms and similar possible causes. To understand the mechanisms of one debilitating disease, a medical researcher tries to separate the "signal" of causes of that disease, in particular, from the "noise" of natural biological variation of human lives and conditions.

Health - 23.01.2019
Assessing the airborne survival of bacteria in aerosol droplets from coughs and sneezes
Assessing the airborne survival of bacteria in aerosol droplets from coughs and sneezes
The airborne transmission of diseases including the common cold, influenza and tuberculosis is something that affects everyone with an average sneeze or cough sending around 100,000 contagious germs into the air at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour. New research led by scientists from the University of Bristol and published today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface , outlines a new technique that, for the first time, examines directly the environmental factors that control the transmission of disease to the level of a single aerosol particle and a single bacterium.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2019
Heart disease risk begins in the womb, study in sheep suggests
Heart disease risk begins in the womb, study in sheep suggests
Offspring whose mothers had a complicated pregnancy may be at greater risk of heart disease in later life, according to a new study in sheep. The research, led by a team at the University of Cambridge, suggests that our cards may be marked even before we are born.

Health - 22.01.2019
Aspirin cuts heart attack risk but increases chance of dangerous bleeding
Regular aspirin should not be recommended for preventing heart attack and stroke in people without cardiovascular disease. The use of aspirin in patients without cardiovascular disease should not be routinely recommended Dr Sean Zheng Lead author This is the latest finding from scientists at Imperial College London, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association .

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2019
Scientists engineer new CRISPR platform for DNA targeting
Scientists engineer new CRISPR platform for DNA targeting
CRISPR team harnesses new Cas12b enzyme for use in eukaryotic cells, adding to the CRISPR toolbox. A team that includes the scientist who first harnessed the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 and other systems for genome editing of eukaryotic organisms, including animals and plants, has engineered another CRISPR system, called Cas12b.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.01.2019
Toddlers in the driving seat at the Lapworth Museum
The deaths of thousands of women from bleeding after childbirth could be prevented by a new drug which does not need to be stored in a refrigerator, according to research conducted in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. Led by the World Health Organisation (WHO) , the study found the 'heat stable' drug, called carbetocin, is as effective at preventing haemorrhaging as oxytocin - the medication which is the first choice treatment in countries such as the UK.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.01.2019
First major study on community hospitals argues policy makers need to focus on social value to patients and communities
UK vitamin D supplementation policy needs to change to protect the health and lives of babies, pregnant women and dark skinned individuals, say University of Birmingham researchers as they today highlighted the death of a baby and serious ill health of two others due to a vitamin D deficiency. The death of six-month-old Noah Thahane, who died following complications of heart failure caused by severe Vitamin D deficiency, was entirely preventable, concluded Dr Wolfgang Högler and PhD doctoral researcher Dr Suma Uday in research published today in BMC Pediatrics.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.01.2019
Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease
Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.

Health - Innovation - 21.01.2019
Finds three major failings in some apps used for the diagnosis of skin cancer
In the scramble to bring successful apps for the diagnosis of skin cancer to market there is a concern that a lack of testing is risking public safety, according to research led by the University of Birmingham. The research, outlined at the British Association of Dermatologists' Annual Meeting in Edinburgh , reviewed the medical literature on skin cancer apps to explore the number of apps on the market, ascertain how accurate they are, and what the benefits and limitations of these technological solutions are.

Health - Administration - 21.01.2019
Tragic death of six month old baby highlights need for policy overhaul regarding vitamin D supplementation
UK vitamin D supplementation policy needs to change to protect the health and lives of babies, pregnant women and dark skinned individuals, say University of Birmingham researchers as they today highlighted the death of a baby and serious ill health of two others due to a vitamin D deficiency. The death of six-month-old Noah Thahane, who died following complications of heart failure caused by severe Vitamin D deficiency, was entirely preventable, concluded Dr Wolfgang Högler and PhD doctoral researcher Dr Suma Uday in research published today in BMC Pediatrics.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.01.2019
Transformational Green Heart project is completed
The deaths of thousands of women from bleeding after childbirth could be prevented by a new drug which does not need to be stored in a refrigerator, according to research conducted in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. Led by the World Health Organisation (WHO) , the study found the 'heat stable' drug, called carbetocin, is as effective at preventing haemorrhaging as oxytocin - the medication which is the first choice treatment in countries such as the UK.

Health - 18.01.2019
To investigate a common Caesarean birth complication
Obstetricians, midwives and women who've had babies by Caesarean section are taking part in a new study to find out which technique is best used by the surgeon if the baby's head is found to be stuck in the pelvis at the time of Caesarean delivery. Around 15% of babies are delivered by emergency C-section in the UK and the problem of 'impacted fetal head' occurs in about 1.5% of these operations - that's around 1,500 babies who have to be manoeuvred very carefully to release their head from the pelvis.

Health - 17.01.2019
One quarter of prisoners have suffered traumatic brain injury
A quarter of all Scottish prisoners have been hospitalised with a traumatic brain injury at some point in their lives, according to new research. ‌ The study, led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Scottish Prison Service and published today in PLOS ONE, also estimates that 10% of prisoners have suffered a severe head injury in their lives, or multiple head injuries that are likely to lead to a persistent disability.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2019
Ers discover the brain cells that make pain unpleasant
Pain sensation and the emotional experience of pain are not the same, and now, in mice, scientists at Stanford have found the neurons responsible for the latter. If you step on a tack, neurons in your brain will register two things: that there's a piercing physical sensation in your foot, and that it's not pleasant.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2019
Finds elevated levels of stress hormone linked to housing type and tenure
A new study examining UK housing data and health outcomes has indicated a link between people living in the private rental sector having higher levels of a stress hormone. The findings, led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Essex, are published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2019
Scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting'T cells
Scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting’T cells
A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells — which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab — into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells. The technique uses structures called artificial thymic organoids, which work by mimicking the environment of the thymus, the organ in which T cells develop from blood stem cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2019
New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis and save the NHS money
Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found. In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.
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