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Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2019
Gene-editing tool now being used to develop better antibiotics
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jason Peters, (608) 265-6744, jason.peters [at] wisc (p) edu × A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher and his collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2019
Autistic people urgently need access to tailored mental health support
New research has revealed that people diagnosed with autism don't have access to effective mental health support, putting them at risk of self-harm and suicide. Researchers from the University of Nottingham, Coventry University and the University of Cambridge worked with a steering group of Autistic adults to design and carry out the research which has recenlty been published in the journal Autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
A new drug delays motor neurone disease progression and improves cognitive and clinical symptoms according to trial results announced by a spin-out company from the Florey and University of Melbourne. A new drug developed by scientists at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience , and the School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute at the University of Melbourne has dramatically improved clinical and cognitive symptoms of motor neurone disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Brain's 'support cells' help mammals to keep time
Brain’s ’support cells’ help mammals to keep time
'Caretaker' cells which support neurons in the brain play more of an active role in circadian rhythms and animal behaviour than previously thought. Astrocytes are star-shaped nerve cells found in the brain and spinal cord that were thought to support neurons in regulating circadian rhythms - the body's internal 24-hour 'clock'.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.01.2019
New drug against the formation of metastasis
New drug against the formation of metastasis
The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis. It spreads cancer cells throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. The development of metastasis is responsible for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths, and patients with a metastatic disease are considered incurable.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
In all the noise that comprises our national news landscape these days, noise itself doesn't often rise to the level of news. That changed in 2016 when U.S. diplomats stationed in Cuba in October repeatedly reported hearing high-pitched sounds that were followed by hearing loss and other medical symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
UCLA researchers led by Dr. Donald Kohn have created a method for modifying blood stem cells to reverse the genetic mutation that causes a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome called IPEX. The gene therapy, which was tested in mice, is similar to the technique Kohn has used to cure patients with another immune disease, severe combined immune deficiency, or SCID, also known as bubble baby disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Immune system’s front-line defense freezes bacteria in their tracks
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE × In the moments leading up to assault by a short, peculiar peptide, the bacteria are happily growing, their DNA jiggling around the cell in the semi-random motions characteristic of life. Seconds later, the jiggling stops. Life grinds to a halt. Some 100 million peptides - short chunks of amino acids, the basic units of proteins - by the name of LL-37 have invaded the cell, where, with strong electric charges, they've bound tightly to the machinery driving the cell, immobilizing and killing it.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Giving Cas9 an 'on' switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
Giving Cas9 an ’on’ switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
CRISPR-Cas9 is a revolutionary tool in part because of its versatility: created by bacteria to chew up viruses, it works equally well in human cells to do all sorts of genetic tricks, including cutting and pasting DNA, making pinpoint mutations and activating or inactivating a gene. UC Berkeley researchers have now made it even more versatile by giving it an "on" switch, allowing users to keep the Cas9 gene editor turned off in all cells except its designated target.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Researchers of the University of Bern have discovered a new molecular regulatory mechanism in unicellular parasites which has never before been observed. RNA fragments do not act as brakes in the cell apparatus, but on the contrary as "stimulants": they boost protein production after periods of stress.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Speeding up genetic diagnosis of Huntington’s disease
Elongated segments of DNA cause Huntington's disease and certain other disorders of the brain. Researchers have developed a method to determine the length of the mutated genes quickly and easily. People with Huntington's disease suffer from jerky body movements and decreasing mental abilities. The condition usually leads to death 15-20 years after diagnosis.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2019
Potential new way to target norovirus family
Researchers have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how a family of viruses, including the norovirus, initiate infections. The new study which includes norovirus and sapoviruses - highly infectious viruses that can cause outbreaks of diarrhoea and vomiting. It is hoped this research may provide a new target for the development of antiviral drugs to prevent diseases like norovirus.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2019
Tumors are not as addicted to glucose as previously thought
Tumors are not as addicted to glucose as previously thought
Scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered that squamous cell skin cancers do not require increased glucose to power their development and growth, contrary to a long-held belief about cancer metabolism. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the metabolic needs of many different types of cancer, and to the development of new cancer treatments.

Health - 09.01.2019
Birmingham Professors win prestigious Blavatnik Awards
A research paper showing the results of a study led by researchers at the University of Birmingham has been crowned 'UK Research Paper of the Year' in The BMJ Awards 2018. The paper, published in The BMJ last October, described the results of the BUMPES trial which aimed to investigate the most ideal position a first-time mother with a low dose epidural should adopt to increase the chance of a birth without interventions such as forceps or a Caesarean.

Health - 09.01.2019
McGill University helps to inform understanding of cancer risk
McGill University has helped develop a global resource that includes data on thousands of inherited variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The BRCA Exchange was created through the BRCA Challenge, a long-term demonstration project initiated by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) to enhance sharing of BRCA1/BRCA2 data.

Health - Innovation - 08.01.2019
Wireless, battery-free, biodegradable blood flow sensor
Transforming super-sensitive touch sensors, Stanford engineers and medical researchers build a way to wirelessly monitor blood flow after surgery. A new device developed by Stanford University researchers could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery. The sensor, detailed in a paper published Jan.

Health - 07.01.2019
Opioid crisis roadmap overlooks gender
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Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2019
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
Scientists call for increased diversity in genomic research
A growing number of genomic studies have generated important discoveries regarding human health and behaviour, but new research from the University of Oxford suggests that scientific advancement is limited by a lack of diversity. The findings show that the people studied in genetic discovery research continue to be overwhelmingly of European descent, but also for the first time reveal that subjects are concentrated in a handful of countries - the UK, US and Iceland, and have specific demographic characteristics.
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