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Results 41 - 60 of 944.


Health - Pharmacology - 30.09.2019
Identifies therapeutic target for high blood pressure in the lungs
FINDINGS Researchers have identified a potential new therapeutic target for those who have high blood pressure in the lungs, or what is known as pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis, a lung disease in which lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred. The discovery helps explain the previously unknown mechanism behind the development of pulmonary hypertension in people with pulmonary fibrosis.

Health - Psychology - 30.09.2019
Does being a ’superwoman’ protect African American women’s health?
A new UC Berkeley study explores how being a "strong black woman” affects the health of African American women coping with racial discrimination. (AP photo by Ivan Gener) The stereotype of the "strong black woman" is more than just a cultural trope: Many black women in America report feeling pressured to act like superwomen, projecting themselves as strong, self-sacrificing, and free of emotion to cope with the stress of raceand gender-based discrimination in their daily lives.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 30.09.2019
Artificial intelligence improves biomedical imaging
Artificial intelligence improves biomedical imaging
ETH researchers use artificial intelligence to improve quality of images recorded by a relatively new biomedical imaging method. This paves the way towards more accurate diagnosis and cost-effective devices. Scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have used machine learning methods to improve optoacoustic imaging.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
A triple drug combination has been used to extend the lifespan of fruit flies by 48% in a new study led by UCL and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing. The three drugs are all already in use as medical treatments: lithium as a mood stabiliser, trametinib as a cancer treatment and rapamycin as an immune system regulator.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.09.2019
Method discovered to reactivate tumour fighting genes ’silenced’ by cancer
Scientists at UCL have developed a method to reactivate 'tumour suppressor' genes, which are switched off by cancer cells - a finding which could lead to new targeted biotherapies for cancer. In the study, published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology , researchers at UCL Cancer Institute and the Cancer Research UK UCL Centre aimed to identify ways to block the function of a regulatory protein called PRC2 (Polycomb repressive complex 2).

Health - Psychology - 26.09.2019
Abused or neglected children are four times more likely to develop serious mental illness
A study by the University of Birmingham has shown that children who have experienced child abuse or neglect are four times more likely to develop serious mental illness such as psychoses, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Researchers studied GP records dating between 1995 and 2018 of 217,758 patients aged under 18 who had experienced, or were suspected to have experienced, childhood maltreatment or related concerns, and then compared them to the records of 423,410 patients who had not.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2019
Potential diagnostic tool, treatment for Parkinson’s disease
In human cell cultures, countering a defect that appears to be nearly universal among patients with Parkinson's disease prevents death in the cells whose loss causes the disease. Investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine have pinpointed a molecular defect that seems almost universal among patients with Parkinson's disease and those at a high risk of acquiring it.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2019
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
Researchers have identified 44 genes linked to age-related hearing loss, giving a much clearer understanding of how the condition develops, in a new study led by UCL and King's College London. In the study, published today in The  American Journal of Human Genetics , researchers analysed the genetic data from over 250,000 participants of the UK Biobank aged 40-69 years to see which genes were associated with people who had reported having or not having hearing problems on questionnaire.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2019
"Push-pull" Dynamic in Brain Network is Key to Stopping Seizures
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that the spreading of seizures through the brain can be suppressed depending on the amount of pressure within the brain, an important discovery that may revolutionize the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting people of all ages.

Health - Materials Science - 26.09.2019
On the road to safe nanomedicine
On the road to safe nanomedicine
Tiny particles that can fight cancer or that can easily pass through any interface within our body are a great promise for medicine. But there is little knowledge thus far about what exactly will happen to nanoparticles within our tissues and whether or not they can cause disease by themselves. Within an international research consortium, Empa scientists have now developed guidelines that should enable the safe development of nanoparticles for medical use.

Health - Psychology - 25.09.2019
Teens sleep 43 more minutes per night after combo of two treatments
Stanford researchers increased how long teens slept with light therapy, used to reset their circadian clocks, combined with cognitive behavioral therapy to motivate them to go to bed earlier.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.09.2019
Adult fly intestine could help understand intestinal regeneration
Adult fly intestine could help understand intestinal regeneration
Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are exposed to diverse types of environmental stresses such as bacteria and toxins, but the mechanisms by which epithelial cells sense stress are not well understood. New research by the universities of Bristol, Heidelberg and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have found that Nox-ROS-ASK1-MKK3-p38 signaling in IECs integrates various stresses to facilitate intestinal regeneration.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.09.2019
Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics
Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics
A new type of vaccine that can be stored at warmer temperatures, removing the need for refrigeration, has been developed for mosquito-borne virus Chikungunya in a major advance in vaccine technology. The findings, published in Science Advances today [Wednesday 25 September], reveal exceptionally promising results for the Chikungunya vaccine candidate, which has been engineered using a synthetic protein scaffold that could revolutionise the way vaccines are designed, produced and stored.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.09.2019
Researchers identify rare inherited immune disease
When a 9-year-old girl with anemia, breathing problems, and recurrent infections sought help for her mysterious ailments, Yale researchers and their collaborators at the National Institutes of Health sequenced her genes to pinpoint a cause. What they discovered was not only a new disease but unexpected new roles for a gene that affects the immune system.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.09.2019
Cancer: the origin of genetic mutations
Cancer: the origin of genetic mutations
By linking DNA replication failures in cancer cells to their genetic instability, researchers at UNIGE unveil a mutation mechanism that is essential for cancer development. When a cell divides into two daughter cells, it must replicate its DNA according to a very specific scenario. In the presence of some disruptive elements, however, cancer cells are unable to perform this operation optimally; replication then takes place more slowly and less efficiently.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 24.09.2019
Artificial intelligence may be as effective as health professionals at diagnosing disease, finds study
Artificial intelligence (AI) appears to detect diseases from medical imaging with similar levels of accuracy as health-care professionals, according to research led by the University of Birmingham and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust. The research, the first systematic review and meta-analysis synthesising all the available evidence from scientific literature, was published today in The Lancet Digital Health .

Life Sciences - Health - 24.09.2019
Achilles’ heel identified in several neurodegenerative diseases
A Stanford research team has identified an oddball way brain cells spread inflammation in several neurodegenerative diseases - and an approach that could counter them all. Many neurodegenerative diseases have a common feature that may make them amenable to the same treatment, investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 24.09.2019
UCL plays significant role in pioneering data research centres
UCL is a key partner in four of seven new centres announced by Health Data Research UK. The data hubs, to be set up across the UK from October this year, will speed up research for new medicines, treatments and health technologies to support quicker diagnosis and save lives. They will promote better use of health data by linking up different types of data and making it more easily accessible and user-friendly for research, while maintaining strict controls around data privacy and consent.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.09.2019
Some high-cholesterol genes differ between countries
Some high-cholesterol genes differ between countries
Some of the genes that predict the risk of high cholesterol don't apply to people from Uganda the same as they do in European populations, finds a new UCL-led study. The new  Nature Communications  study adds to evidence that genetic research involved in drug development and risk prediction testing might not apply equally to non-European populations.

Health - 24.09.2019
Affordable Care Act slashed uninsured rate among people with diabetes
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provided health insurance for an estimated 1.9 million people with diabetes, according to a newly published study. In 2009 and 2010, 17 percent of adults who were under age 65 and had diabetes were uninsured. After the ACA took effect, that percentage declined by 12 percentage points and by 27 percentage points among those with low income.

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