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Health - Pharmacology - 01.02.2019
New vaccine for malaria developed at IME could be more effective
Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago have developed an innovative new system for delivering a malaria vaccine that shows promise in its effectiveness. By developing a vaccine that targets specific cells in the immune system, they have seen a much greater immune and antibody response to the vaccine.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2019
Microbes hitched to insects provide a rich source of new antibiotics
A Cyphomyrmex ant. These fungus-growing ants harbored a microbe that made the newly discovered antibiotic cyphomycin. Photo by Alex Wild Medicine was transformed in the 20th century by the discovery and development of antibiotics, the vast majority of which came from one source: soil bacteria. But we seem to have tapped out that supply.

Health - 01.02.2019
Cancer immunologist hosts live Q&A on Reddit
Dr Jessica Strid discussed her research on how the immune system controls skin cancer in a live 'Ask Me Anything' (AMA) session on Reddit. Dr Strid who is a senior lecturer in Imperial's Faculty of Medicine , held her session on the social news aggregation, rating, and discussion website on Tuesday 29 January.

Health - Social Sciences - 01.02.2019
Risks of eating disorders revealed from childhood
Risks of eating disorders revealed from childhood
Researchers in Geneva, Switzerland and the United States highlight the link between abnormal body weight in very young children and a higher risk of developing eating disorders in adolescence. Eating disorders - anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or bine eating disorder - usually start in adolescence and often leave young patients and their families helpless.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2019
Genetic testing gives answers on developmental disorders during pregnancy
Research carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has found that genetic testing improves the diagnoses of abnormalities in developing babies that are picked up during ultrasound scans. The research, published today in The Lancet , was carried out by the University of Birmingham's Institute of Metabolism and Systems, Wellcome Sanger Institute, University of Cambridge, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) and their collaborators.

Health - 31.01.2019
How Type 1 Diabetes Gradually Destroys Insulin Production
How Type 1 Diabetes Gradually Destroys Insulin Production
Using the new Imaging Mass Cytometry method, Zurich researchers have investigated the pancreas of healthy organ donors and those with type 1 diabetes. The study shows that many beta cells, which normally produce insulin, are still present in the early stages of the disease, but look very different. These beta cells could potentially be rescued for the benefit of the patient and the progression of the disease could be slowed down or even stopped.

Health - Environment - 31.01.2019
Scientifically Proven: Air Pollution Harms Health
Scientifically Proven: Air Pollution Harms Health
The debate on air quality standards for ambient air pollutants such as nitrogen oxide, particulate matter and ozone has revived in Germany last week. The International Society for Environmental Epidemiology and the Environment and Health Committee of the European Respiratory Society have now issued a statement on the debate of the effects of air pollution on health.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2019
What the NFL can tell us about longevity: There’s no need to act your age
There are many ways to frame the forces that shape this Sunday's Super Bowl - East Coast vs. West Coast, dynasty (the New England Patriots) vs. upstarts (the Los Angeles Rams). But there's an even more stark contrast in the matter of age. That is, we have 40-something quarterback Tom Brady for the Patriots vs.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2019
Bacteria promote lung tumor development
Bacteria promote lung tumor development
Antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs may help combat lung cancer. MIT cancer biologists have discovered a new mechanism that lung tumors exploit to promote their own survival: These tumors alter bacterial populations within the lung, provoking the immune system to create an inflammatory environment that in turn helps the tumor cells to thrive.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.01.2019
Statin therapy reduces cardiovascular disease risk in older people
Statin therapy reduces major vascular events, such as heart attacks and strokes, in people of all ages, including those over the age of 75, according to a new study published in The Lancet. The study assessed the effects of statins in nearly 187,000 people who had taken part in 28 large clinical trials.

Health - 31.01.2019
New method may better predict the best treatment for burn wounds
Technique involves use of non-invasive digital infrared imaging According to the World Health Organization, approximately 180 000 deaths every year are caused by burns, with the majority occurring in lowand middle-income countries. Upon arriving at the emergency room with a burn, the patient undergoes a clinical inspection to assess both the severity of the lesion in relation to the affected area of the body and the depth of the injury (1st, 2nd or 3rd-degree burns).

Life Sciences - Health - 30.01.2019
Skin colour and neurodevelopment are not linked
The latest findings from the international INTERGROWTH-21st Project, that has monitored healthy, urban children from educated families across four continents from early pregnancy to 2 years of age, show that human neurodevelopment is not influenced by the colour of an individual's skin.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.01.2019
Led team uncovers critical new clues about what goes awry in brains of people with autism
Led team uncovers critical new clues about what goes awry in brains of people with autism
A team of UCLA-led scientists has discovered important clues to what goes wrong in the brains of people with autism — a developmental disorder with no cure and for which scientists have no deep understanding of what causes it. The new insights involve RNA editing — in which genetic material is normal, but modifications in RNA alter nucleotides, whose patterns carry the data required for constructing proteins.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2019
Set of genes predicts severity of dengue
Stanford researchers have identified 20 genes that can predict an individual's likelihood of developing a severe form of dengue fever with about 80 percent accuracy. There's no such thing as a "good" case of dengue fever, but some are worse than others, and it's difficult to determine which patients will make a smooth recovery and which may find their condition life-threatening.

Health - Environment - 30.01.2019
Into age-related eye disease to investigate genetic risk factors
Over 60s residents of an East Yorkshire town are being offered the chance to play an important role in the future development of personalised treatments for age-related eye disease. The Bridlington Eye Assessment Project (BEAP), led by The University of Nottingham, is appealing for people to take part in research that aims to more accurately predict how many patients are likely to be affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and those who are at a greater risk due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.01.2019
New doctoral programme will reinvigorate forest research
University of Birmingham researchers, with industry partners including health technology companies Dignio and Datatrial, have been awarded 1.1 million by UK Research & Innovation (UKRI)'s Innovate UK, to investigate patients' experience of cell and gene therapies. The funding has been provided as part of the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund's Medicines Manufacturing programme.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2019
Fungal infection affecting frogs' future
Fungal infection affecting frogs’ future
Researchers have identified how a fungal skin infection is wiping out our native frog species at an alarming rate. The University of Queensland-led team investigated the chytrid fungus ( Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis ), which affects more than 500 species worldwide and is hampering frog conservation.

Health - Physics - 30.01.2019
Ingestible, expanding pill monitors the stomach for up to a month
Ingestible, expanding pill monitors the stomach for up to a month
Soft, squishy device could potentially track ulcers, cancers, and other GI conditions over the long term. The inflatable pill is embedded with a sensor that continuously tracks the stomach's temperature for up to 30 days. If the pill needs to be removed from the stomach, a patient can drink a solution of calcium that triggers the pill to quickly shrink to its original size and pass safely out of the body.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.01.2019
No-Deal Brexit will severely impact NHS delivery across devolved jurisdictions -report reveals
In the case of a ‘No-Deal' scenario, it appears inevitable that there will be some impact on NHS delivery of services, recruitment of healthcare professionals and access to medicines. Very clear contingency planning may ameliorate some of the impact, reveals a new report by the academic group ‘ The UK in a Changing Europe' , which includes researchers from the University of Birmingham.

Pharmacology - Health - 29.01.2019
New target for gastric cancer therapies
New target for gastric cancer therapies
Cardiff University researchers have uncovered new information about the underlying mechanisms for gastric cancer, providing hope of potential new therapies in the future. The team, at the University's European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, found they could stop gastric cells dividing and growing by deleting a particular cell-surface receptor implicated in the function of stem cells.

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