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History / Archeology - Religions - 09.09.2019
Skeletons yield clues about 19th-century immigrant life in New Haven
Skeletons yield clues about 19th-century immigrant life in New Haven
On July 12, 2011, a human bone was discovered jutting from a drainage trench at a construction site at Yale New Haven Hospital. The New Haven police and state coroner were called, but it was no crime scene. Michael Massella, a security officer on duty at the hospital, contacted his co-worker Anthony Griego, a retired New Haven police officer and local historian.

History / Archeology - Environment - 30.08.2019
Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew
Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew
Humans had caused significant landcover change on Earth up to 4000 years earlier than previously thought, University of Queensland researchers have found. The School of Social Sciences ' Dr Andrea Kay said some scientists defined the Anthropocene as starting in the 20th century, but the new research showed human-induced landcover change was globally extensive by 2000BC.

History / Archeology - Environment - 30.08.2019
Sydney expertise helps reveal Earth’s early transformation
University of Sydney experts are among a global group of 250 archaeologists who have contributed to a groundbreaking assessment of ancient land use. Professor Peter Hiscock and Dr Patrick Faulkner from the University's Department of Archaeology are members of the ArchaeoGLOBE project , a global group of hundreds of archaeologists sharing knowledge on human land use across the globe over the past 10,000 years.

Environment - History / Archeology - 29.08.2019
Crowdsourced archaeology shows how humans have influenced Earth for thousands of years
Crowdsourced archaeology shows how humans have influenced Earth for thousands of years
This time-lapse map shows how extensive agriculture (noncontinuous cultivation, or the "beginnings" of farming) spread as a percentage of land use. To highlight land use in Oceania, four groups of islands are represented by icons. Nicolas Gauthier/Arizona State University Humans' ability to transform the natural environment is often considered a modern phenomenon, from increasing deforestation, soil erosion and greenhouse gas emissions.

History / Archeology - Religions - 28.08.2019
German Research Foundation awards funding to a University of Münster excavation project
German Research Foundation awards funding to a University of Münster excavation project
For more than 20 years, the staff of the Asia Minor Research Centre at the Department of Ancient History of Münster University has been investigating the cultural legacy of the ancient city of Doliche in south-eastern Turkey. The German Research Foundation (DFG) is now funding the project with around 800,000 euros for a further three years.

History / Archeology - 21.08.2019
New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle
New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle
Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject of continued debate and archaeological manipulation. The mysterious skeleton and associated grave goods, including a sword and two knives, were identified as Viking by the Nazis, as a Slavonic warrior by the Soviets and became part of the Czech independence movement in more recent years.

History / Archeology - 16.08.2019
Understanding ourselves and our past
Since the earliest civilizations, people have recorded their thoughts and experiences through storytelling, art, philosophy and other forms of expression. Studying these works - collectively known as the humanities - helps us understand the past and ultimately ourselves. Today's humanities scholars are rediscovering the past through traditional ways, such as reexamining an ancient mummy case with a fresh perspective, as well as more modern techniques, which include the use of big data analysis or 3-D and X-ray models.

Environment - History / Archeology - 24.07.2019
The climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years
The climate is warming faster than it has in the last 2,000 years
In contrast to pre-industrial climate fluctuations, current, anthropogenic climate change is occurring across the whole world at the same time. In addition, the speed of global warming is higher than it has been in at least 2,000 years. That's according to two studies from the University of Bern. Many people have a clear picture of the "Little Ice Age" (from approx. 1300 to 1850).

Health - History / Archeology - 12.06.2019
To the Spa for Research
International Research Project Studies Social Significance of Health Resorts No 169/2019 from Jun 12, 2019 A team of researchers from the universities of Amsterdam and Lund, Queen Mary University in London, and Freie Universität Berlin is starting a research project on health resorts as a location of transnational encounter and debate.

History / Archeology - 20.05.2019
Facial reconstruction breathes new life into ancient citizens of Sagalassos
A look into the past. It's usually just a metaphor, but archaeologists Jeroen Poblome and Sam Cleymans have made it a physical reality. Together with the University of Burdur, Turkey, they have reconstructed the faces of two centuries-old residents of Sagalassos. For over thirty years, KU Leuven researchers have been examining the archaeological site of Sagalassos with an international and interdisciplinary team.

History / Archeology - Computer Science / Telecom - 17.05.2019
Historian Prof. Torsten Hiltmann aims to make use of machine learning for medieval research
Historian Prof. Torsten Hiltmann aims to make use of machine learning for medieval research
Centuries-old manuscripts, documents and heraldic images: at first glance, medieval research and artificial intelligence seem to be a contradiction in terms. After all, historical studies and the like were long seen as being subjects greatly removed from the world of IT. However, methods such as machine learning on the part of computer programmes, which learn new things and correct themselves, open up new opportunities for historians doing research.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 16.05.2019
Reveals what was on the menu for medieval peasants
Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered, for the first time, definitive evidence that determines what types of food medieval peasants ate and how they managed their animals. Using chemical analysis of pottery fragments and animal bones found at one of England's earliest medieval villages, combined with detailed examination of a range of historical documents and accounts, the research has revealed the daily diet of peasants in the Middle Ages.

Chemistry - History / Archeology - 06.05.2019
Ayahuasca fixings found in 1,000-year-old Andean sacred bundle
Ritual bundle contents include leather bag, carved wooden snuff tablets and snuff tube with human hair braids, pouch made of fox snouts and camelid bone spatulas. (Photos courtesy of Juan Albarracin-Jordan and José M. Capriles) Today's hipster creatives and entrepreneurs are hardly the first generation to partake of ayahuasca, according to archaeologists who have discovered traces of the powerfully hallucinogenic potion in a 1,000-year-old leather bundle buried in a cave in the Bolivian Andes.

History / Archeology - Innovation / Technology - 23.04.2019
Using X-ray technology to clear up an archeological secret
In an important first, EPFL and Vaud Canton's archeology office used X-ray scanning technology to unlock the mysteries of an extremely rare chainmail shirt dating from Roman times. The results will go on display at the Cantonal Museum of Archeology and History in Lausanne from 26 April to 25 August.

Innovation / Technology - History / Archeology - 16.04.2019
Research helps show how technology behind the V&A's Cast Courts underpins the modern world
Research helps show how technology behind the V&A’s Cast Courts underpins the modern world
Sussex research helps show how technology behind the V&A's Cast Courts underpins the modern world Research conducted by a University of Sussex teaching fellow has proved fundamental to the recently restored Cast Courts at the Victoria and Albert Museum, revealing how the developments pioneered by a Victorian manufacturer are relevant today.

History / Archeology - 02.04.2019
Digging for clues to the lives of 19th-century Chinese migrants
Digging for clues to the lives of 19th-century Chinese migrants
Home villages of Chinese migrants who traveled to the United States and other countries during the 19th century are being excavated for the first time through a project led by Stanford anthropologist Barbara Voss. A collaboration among Stanford archaeologists and scholars in China is helping reveal the culture and lives of Chinese migrants who traveled across the Pacific Ocean to the United States and other places during the 19th century.

Religions - History / Archeology - 27.03.2019
Voices from Beyond
Voices from Beyond
The voice is a fleeting medium. As the primary means of human communication, it also plays an important role in religion. And yet it is difficult to grasp and seems to elude discussion. But a research project at the Cluster of Excellence has nonetheless approached the voice in a religious context: scholars from various disciplines have studied the voice as a medium of religious communication, and have discovered in historical testimonies, as well as in literature and artwork from various religions and cultures from antiquity to the present day, what can be called "voices from beyond".

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 13.03.2019
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain - with people and animals travelling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals. The study, led by Dr Richard Madgwick of Cardiff University, is the most comprehensive to date and examined the bones of 131 pigs, the prime feasting animals, from four Late Neolithic (c.

History / Archeology - 05.03.2019
Archaeologists find world's oldest human bone tattooing kit
Archaeologists find world’s oldest human bone tattooing kit
Researchers have uncovered the world's oldest known tattooist's kit - and among the most startling conclusions is that two of the four tattooing tools found are made from human bone. The intricate, multi-toothed tattooing tools were found on Tongatapu Island - Tonga's main island. Radiocarbon dating found them to be around 2,700 years old, making them the oldest confirmed tattooing combs found in Oceania.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 14.02.2019
Explains how rabbits adapted to survive myxomatosis
An unprecedented study of rabbit DNA spanning 150 years and thousands of miles has revealed the genetic basis for the animal's fightback - and ultimate triumph, against the deadly myxoma virus. The revelation of how rabbits evolved genetic resistance to myxomatosis through natural selection, comes as part of an international research collaboration, nearly seventy years after the lethal disease decimated species' populations of Australia, Britain and France.

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