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Life Sciences - 25.03.2019
Engineering cellular function without living cells
Engineering cellular function without living cells
EPFL scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression - without using cells. Using their innovative, quantitative approach, they measured important parameters governing gene regulation. This allowed them to design and construct a synthetic biological logic gate, which could one day be used to introduce new functions into cells.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
How new ketamine drug helps with depression
On March 5, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first truly new medication for major depression in decades. The drug is a nasal spray called esketamine, derived from ketamine-an anesthetic that has made waves for its surprising antidepressant effect.   Because treatment with esketamine might be so helpful to patients with treatment-resistant depression (meaning standard treatments had not helped them), the FDA expedited the approval process to make it more quickly available.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
Mouse Study Yields Long-Awaited Insights into Human Stomach Cancer
A new breed of lab mouse could finally provide an animal model for stomach cancer research - and one potential treatment target has already been revealed Research Scientist Antoine Snijders (right) and postdoc Pin Wang analyze mouse blood samples. (Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab) Mice have been instrumental in the study of cancer, but like all animal models of human diseases, they have their limitations.

Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
Sound the alarm! How injured plant cells warn their neighbors
Sound the alarm! How injured plant cells warn their neighbors
All organisms can be injured. But what happens when a plant is injured? How can it heal itself and avoid infections' An international research team from the University of Basel and Ghent University has reported on wound reaction mechanisms in plants . Their insights into plant immune systems could be used for new approaches to sustainable crop production.

Life Sciences - 21.03.2019
Half a billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies
Half a billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies
One of the ocean's little known carnivores has been allocated a new place in the evolutionary tree of life after scientists discovered its unmistakable resemblance with other sea-floor dwelling creatures. Comb jellies occupy a pivotal place in the history of animal evolution with some arguing that they were among the first animals to evolve.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.03.2019
Memory like a Sieve - Or Not
Study by Research Team at Freie Universität Led by Biology Professor Stephan Sigrist on Conditions for Improving Memory Formation in Aging Humans No 063/2019 from Mar 21, 2019 Humans are not only capable of forming memories but also recalling these memories years later. However, with advancing age many of us face difficulties with forming new memories, a process usually referred to as age-induced memory impairment.

Life Sciences - Physics - 21.03.2019
Engineering Technique Provides Insight into Cellular Forces
Kris Dahl, a chemical engineering and biomedical engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University, is using a new method to understand how cells are structured. Her method uses densely packed regions of condensed DNA, known as chromatin, to be used a sensors for cellular force generation. The technique, known as SINK, which stands for sensors from intranuclear kinetics, allowed Dahl and her team to provide physical and biological insights into cells.

Life Sciences - 21.03.2019
Robots enable bees and fish to talk to each other
Robots enable bees and fish to talk to each other
Through an imaginative experiment, researchers were able to get two extremely different animal species located far apart to interact with each other and reach a shared decision with the help of robots. Bees and fish don't often have the occasion to meet, nor would they have much to say to each other if they did.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.03.2019
Discovery of a new heart muscle component
Discovery of a new heart muscle component
In order for the heart to work properly, it must exert muscular force. This involves the coordinated contraction of numerous sarcomeres, the smallest contractile units of heart muscle. Muscle contraction is brought about by the activity of conventional motor proteins, which pull on thin filaments to shorten sarcomeres.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 20.03.2019
Nicotine addiction from vaping is a bigger problem than teens realize
As the vaping epidemic continues, researchers point to well-known health risks associated with nicotine. Data show clearly that young people are vaping in record numbers. And despite the onslaught of reports and articles highlighting not only its dangers but the marketing tactics seemingly aimed to hook teens and young adults, the number of vaping users continues to climb.  These teens may be overlooking (or underestimating) a key ingredient in the vapors they inhale: nicotine.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.03.2019
How our body «listens» to vibrations
How our body «listens» to vibrations
UNIGE researchers show that, for the brain, sounds and vibrations are ultimately quite similar. This would explain why vibrations are sometimes as unpleasant as noise pollution. We all know the feeling of a mobile phone vibrating in our hands when announcing an incoming call. If we perceive these vibrations so clearly, it is due to specialized receptors that transduce them into neural signals sent to our brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2019
Protein BRCA1 as a Stress Coach
Protein BRCA1 as a Stress Coach
03/20/2019 Two proteins work hand in hand to ensure that the tumour cells of neuroblastoma can grow at full speed. In "Nature", a Würzburg research team shows how the proteins can do this. Anyone who has ever studied the molecular basis of breast cancer will probably have heard of the abbreviation BRCA1 - this is a protein that protects the cells of breast tissue against cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2019
Reshapes Understanding of How the Brain Recovers from Injury
Researchers to incorporate data into new, open access platform for exploration of the human brain New research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B , sheds light on how the damage in the brain caused by a stroke can lead to permanent vision impairment for approximately 265,000 Americans each year.

Life Sciences - 19.03.2019
Starving bacteria can eject their tails to save energy and stay alive
When nutrients are dangerously low, a group of bacteria have been found to take the drastic measure of getting rid of their tails. Some bacteria use tails, or flagella, to swim through liquids - including those in our bodies. However, new research published today in PLOS Biology reveals a surprisingly drastic measure taken by some bacteria when facing starvation: they eject their flagella, leaving themselves paralyzed, but conserving energy so they can stay alive.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.03.2019
What’s controlling chameleon-like abilities in squid
In the blink of an eye, a squid's "smart skin" can switch color and pattern for the purpose of camouflage or sexual signaling-a virtuosic display that has long fascinated scientists. Now, scientists from the UChicago-affiliated Marine Biological Laboratory  and from  Northeastern University  report a paradigm-shifting discovery in how specialized organs in squid skin, called chromatophores, contribute to the feat via an elegant interplay of pigmentary action and structural coloration.

Life Sciences - 19.03.2019
Have microscope, will travel: New tech project links Madison, Boston scientists
An invention designed to transform how and where high-powered research microscopes are deployed - and who gets to use them - will make its way from Madison this spring to the fertile biology labs of greater Boston. A portable, shareable scientific microscope nicknamed Flamingo, created in 2018 by imaging pioneer Jan Huisken of the Morgridge Institute for Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will make its cross-country journey thanks to support announced today by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI).

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.03.2019
A distinct form of epigenetic memory
A distinct form of epigenetic memory
Epigenetic memory of transcriptional gene silencing has been observed in several organisms. However, it was not known whether mechanisms exist that convey transgenerational memory of a silencing “experience”, without silencing the gene permanently. The Bühler group has now found such a phenomenon in a unicellular organism.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.03.2019
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
Take protein - for instance, in the form of skimmed-milk powder - and put a pinch of it in a test tube. To determine how efficiently this dietary protein is converted into endogenous protein, follow the recipe described in the online science step-by-step in the laboratory. And voilà, the value of the protein, i.e. its benefit for humans, is revealed.

Life Sciences - 19.03.2019
Evolutionary nightmare: Parasites pass on their manipulatory characteristics
Evolutionary nightmare: Parasites pass on their manipulatory characteristics
In order to move from one host to another, certain parasites change their behaviour. The more effectively a parasite can manipulate its host, the greater its evolutionary advantage. It therefore passes on its characteristics to its descendants, as a new Eawag study has shown. Many parasites move from host to host several times during their life cycle, including the parasitic tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus , which infects three hosts altogether.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.03.2019
Zika study may ’supercharge’ vaccine research
Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines. The study, led by The University of Queensland and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute , used a new technique to uncover Zika mutations that help foster virus replication in mosquito hosts, while hindering its ability to replicate in mammals.
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