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Life Sciences - Psychology - 20.09.2019
Sparking new autism discoveries
Nichelle Decius, a member of the UM-NSU CARD's research staff, takes a saliva sample from a girl who is enrolling in the SPARK study. Nichelle Decius, a member of the UM-NSU CARD's research staff, takes a saliva sample from a girl who is enrolling in the SPARK study. University of Miami researchers who are collaborating on the world's largest autism research project see promising results in the first study.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 20.09.2019
Quality control in immune communication
Quality control in immune communication
The cells of our immune system constantly communicate with one another by exchanging complex protein molecules. A team led by researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now revealed how dedicated cellular control proteins, referred to as chaperones, detect immature immune signaling proteins and prevent them from leaving the cell.

Life Sciences - 20.09.2019
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
UNIGE researchers have demonstrated how the harsh sounds used in alarm systems hold the brain's attention by stimulating its aversion networks. Why do the harsh sounds emitted by alarms or human shrieks grab our attention? What is going on in the brain when it detects these frequencies' Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and Geneva University Hospitals (HUG), Switzerland, have been analysing how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.09.2019
Drug target for Alzheimer's disease has dual action
Drug target for Alzheimer’s disease has dual action
UQ researchers have discovered a potential drug target for Alzheimer's disease — an enzyme which has effects on both the immune and nervous systems. Dr Ramón Martínez-Mármol and Professor Frédéric A. Meunier from the Queensland Brain Institute Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research found that targeting one enzyme could combat the disease on two fronts.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.09.2019
Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
An international team of researchers led by ETH has shown that antimicrobial-resistant infections are rapidly increasing in animals in low and middle income countries. They produced the first global of resistance rates, and identified regions where interventions are urgently needed. The world is experiencing unprecedented economic growth in lowand middle-income countries.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.09.2019
Brain tumors form synapses with healthy neurons
Tumors called high-grade gliomas wire themselves into the healthy brain, receiving and interpreting electrical signals from normal neurons, a Stanford study has found. Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown for the first time that severe brain cancers integrate into the brain's wiring.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.09.2019
Babies born by C-section have different gut bacteria
Babies born by caesarean section have a reduced level of "good" gut bacteria and an increased number of pathogens linked to hospital environments, according to research co-led by UCL that is the most comprehensive study of the baby microbiome to date. In the study researchers analysed gut bacteria in stool samples taken from 596 babies born in British hospitals - 314 babies who had a natural, or vaginal, birth, and 282 who were born by caesarean.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.09.2019
"Genetic variants associated with educational attainment" can also have positive implications for lifestyle
A German and British research team lead by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has examined the interplay between genetics, cardiovascular disease and educational attainment in a major population study. Genetic variants which had been linked to educational attainment in other studies were observed in the subjects.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.09.2019
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research and University of Bern have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. In 2018, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women worldwide, accounting for about a quarter of all reported cancers.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. Image: Breast cancer cells (blue) associate with glutamate-secreting neurons (red) to stimulate NMDA receptor-mediated signaling (green) of tumor growth (STED super-resolution microscopy).  In 2018, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women worldwide, accounting for about a quarter of all reported cancers.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Babies’ gut bacteria affected by delivery method
Babies born vaginally have different gut bacteria - their microbiome - than those delivered by Caesarean, research has shown. Scientists from the University of Birmingham, Wellcome Sanger Institute, UCL, and their collaborators discovered that whereas vaginally born babies got most of their gut bacteria from their mother, babies born via caesarean did not, and instead had more bacteria associated with hospital environments in their guts.

Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Why humans take so long to grow up
Why do our children take so long to grow up, compared to other animals? We all know that humans have big brains. In common with apes, we grow relatively slowly and generally have long lives. What is not yet entirely clear is why we have this slow steady development and live longer than species with smaller brains.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Points to new drug target in fight against cancer
Points to new drug target in fight against cancer
Research shows how a cancer-linked protein blocks key mitochondrial gateway Researchers have identified a potential new drug target in the fight against cancer. In a study this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , an international team of researchers describe how a cancer-linked version of the protein mitoNEET can close the primary gateways in the outer surface of mitochondria , the "power plants” that supply cells with chemical energy.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Interactions between bacteria and parasites
Interactions between bacteria and parasites
A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has completed the first study of the effects of a simultaneous infection with blood flukes (schistosomes) and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori - a fairly common occurrence in some parts of the world. They identified a complex interaction which resulted - among other effects - in a weakening of the adverse impact of the pathogens acting individually.

Innovation / Technology - Life Sciences - 17.09.2019
Novel viruses carried by the Scottish midge
Novel viruses carried by the Scottish midge
Scientists discover novel viruses carried by the Scottish midge Scotland's biting midge population carries previously-unknown viruses, according to new research. The study - published in Viruses and carried out by scientists at the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) - used high throughput sequencing to study, for the first time, the total collection of viruses in the biting midge ( Culicoides impunctatus ).

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 17.09.2019
Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish. The research, published in Neuron , found a gene that responds to brain activity in order to coordinate the need for sleep. It helps shed new light on how sleep is regulated in the brain.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 16.09.2019
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
New microscopes to unravel the mysteries of brain organization
The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today . The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 16.09.2019
Breakthrough in harnessing the power of biological catalysts
The power of nature could soon be used to create day-to-day materials such as paints, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in a much more environmentally friendly way, thanks to a new breakthrough from scientists at Cardiff University. The international team, led by the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, has successfully unlocked the catalytic abilities of enzymes taken from fungi by creating the perfect conditions needed for them to function.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2019
No limits for UQ’s Tall Poppies
Developing diagnostic tests for ovarian cancer and finding better treatments for schizophrenia are among the pursuits of five University of Queensland researchers honoured in the 2019 Young Tall Poppy Science Awards. The annual awards - presented on Friday (September 13) - recognise outstanding young scientists demonstrating excellence in both research and science communication.

Music - Life Sciences - 13.09.2019
Reveals the role of childhood vision behind associations between shapes and sounds
Reveals the role of childhood vision behind associations between shapes and sounds
How do our senses, like vision, hearing, and touch, work together to create the perception of the world around us' A new study by scientists at Universität Hamburg finds that commonly found associations between shapes and sounds might rely on childhood vision. The results were published in the journal Psychological Science.
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