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Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally, it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding - and only the right structure will “unlock” the drug's therapeutic effect.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.05.2019
Scientists use molecular tethers and chemical 'light sabers' to construct platforms for tissue engineering
Scientists use molecular tethers and chemical ’light sabers’ to construct platforms for tissue engineering
Tissue engineering could transform medicine. Instead of waiting for our bodies to regrow or repair damage after an injury or disease, scientists could grow complex, fully functional tissues in a laboratory for transplantation into patients. Proteins are key to this future. In our bodies, protein signals tell cells where to go, when to divide and what to do.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
Researchers from the Alberto Santos Dumont Association for Research Support (AASDAP) in Brazil, in collaboration with EPFL, have developed a non-invasive strategy that combines functional electrostimulation and a brain-machine interface to help people with paraplegia walk again. This rehabilitation approach was tested on two patients, who showed an improvement in their motor skills and a partial neurological recovery.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2019
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms, new research suggests An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. Brain aneurysms are a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.

Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
International research finds bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex Bedbugs - some of the most unwanted human bedfellows - have been parasitic companions with other species asides from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Empathic birds
Empathic birds
Raven observers show emotional contagion with raven demonstrators experiencing an unpleasant affect To effectively navigate the social world, we need information about each other's emotions. Emotional contagion has been suggested to facilitate such information transmission, constituting a basic building block of empathy that could also be present in non-human animals.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
The insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
The insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
Neuroscientists at EPFL have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events. Acute pain, e.g. hitting your leg against a sharp object, causes an abrupt, unpleasant feeling. In this way, we learn from painful experiences to avoid future harmful situations.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Reveals role of neonatal brain cells in early bonding in mammals
What drives the social bond between offspring and caregivers in the first few days of life? A Yale-led team of researchers has found clues in specific neurons in the brains of neonatal mice that are associated with feeding. The neurons, known as Agrp, regulate feeding behavior in adult mammals, but it was not clear what role they played in early development.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation's Lifesavers'
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation’s Lifesavers’
A University of Bristol researcher who discovered that cooling babies who have suffered a lack of oxygen at birth improves their survival without brain damage in later childhood, is named by Universities UK as one of the 'Nation's Lifesavers'. One in 1,000 babies born at full term in the UK suffer brain injury as a result of being severely deprived of oxygen.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
UC San Diego Ranked Ninth in World in Biomedical Sciences
Nature Index also cited UC San Diego sixth among US academic institutions and UC San Diego Health Sciences seventh among health care institutions in 2019 In its first-ever assessment of biomedical institutions around the world, based upon published research in a targeted set of high-quality scientific journals, the 2019 Nature Index ranked University of California San Diego ninth among the top 200 institutions in biomedical sciences worldwide.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Breakthrough Technique for Studying Gene Expression Takes Root in Plants
Berkeley Lab scientists adapt open-source genetic analysis method for use in plant cells for the first time Researcher Christine Shulse tends to Arabidopsis plants in a lab at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI). (Photo credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab) An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time - an advance that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crop plants.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.05.2019
Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier
A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. One major challenge in treating cancers and other disorders of the brain is ensuring that medicines reach their targets. A team of biomedical engineers and clinician-scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas at Austin borrowed molecules from the immune system of the parasitic sea lamprey to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly to brain tumors.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.05.2019
Mapping microbial symbioses in forests
Data collected from over 1 million forest plots reveals patterns of where plant roots form symbiotic relationships with fungi and bacteria. In and around the tangled roots of the forest floor, fungi and bacteria grow with trees, exchanging nutrients for carbon in a vast, global marketplace. A new effort to map the most abundant of these symbiotic relationships - involving more than 1.1 million forest sites and 28,000 tree species - has revealed factors that determine where different types of symbionts will flourish.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.05.2019
Lowering blood pressure reduces brain bleeding in strokes
The search for treatments for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, the most devastating type of stroke, which carries a 40% mortality rate, has been rife with disappointments. But a new study suggests that intensive blood pressure lowering may reduce the amount of bleeding in deep areas of the brain in patients with the condition, a team of Yale researchers report May 13 in the journal JAMA Neurology.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
A new way to wind the development clock of cardiac muscle cells
These days, scientists can collect a few skin or blood cells, wipe out their identities, and reprogram them to become virtually any other kind of cell in the human body, from neurons to heart cells.    The journey from skin cell to  another type of  functional cell involves converting them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which  are  similar to the developmentally immature  stem  cells found in embryos, and then coaxing them to mature into  something different.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.05.2019
Relay station in the brain controls our movements
Relay station in the brain controls our movements
The relay station of the brain, the substantia nigra consists of different types of nerve cells and is responsible for controlling the execution of diverse movements. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now characterized two of these cell populations more precisely and has been able to assign an exact function to each of them.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.05.2019
Fascinating microorganisms in perialpine lakes
Fascinating microorganisms in perialpine lakes
The lakes in the perialpine regions of Europe are home to a particular community of cyanobacteria which Marie-Eve Monchamp investigated in connection with her doctoral thesis at Eawag. "We collected sediment cores from ten lakes in Switzerland, Italy and France, and analysed the cyanobacterial DNA extracted from these cores", she explains.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
Symbionts as lifesavers
Symbionts as lifesavers
Researchers discover new factor influencing the spread of Legionella When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. But where do these pathogens come from and how do they thrive in the environment before the infection occurs' An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled this question using an important bacterial pathogen that causes lung disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
It’s in the Weeds: Herbicide Linked to Human Liver Disease
Exposure to glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the popular weed killer Roundup, correlates to more severe cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Glyphosate, the primary ingredient in Monsanto's popular weed killer Roundup, has been linked to liver disease in animal models. In a new study, the first of its kind, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine report an association between the herbicide and negative effects upon the human liver.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.05.2019
Second grant to bring research to market
05/14/2019 Getting an accurate picture of the real-time transcriptional activity of a cell: This is the goal of a new research project at the University of Würzburg which is funded by the European Research Council. If you paid attention during biology lessons, you may remember that genetic information in human cells is contained in the cell nucleus as a DNA double helix.
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