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Life Sciences - 16.01.2019
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
A robot recreates the walk of a 300-million-year-old animal
Using the fossil and fossilized footprints of a 300-million-year-old animal, an interdisciplinary team that includes scientists from EPFL and Humboldt-Universitšt zu Berlin have developed a method for identifying the most likely gaits of extinct animals and designed a robot that can recreate their walk.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.01.2019
Biodiversity research at Stanford
Truly grasping the importance of biodiversity means diving down into the microscopic organisms in our soils and out to human social relationships affecting our ecosystems. The more we know, the better we can address threats to species diversity. As simple as it is to understand the concept of biodiversity - the variety of species in an ecosystem - the reality is mind-blowingly complex.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.01.2019
Engineered'T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Engineered’T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Organ transplant rejection is a major problem in transplantation medicine. Suppressing the immune system to prevent organ rejection, however, opens the door to life-threatening infections. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now discovered a molecular approach preventing rejection of the transplanted graft while simultaneously maintaining the ability to fight against infections.

Innovation / Technology - Life Sciences - 15.01.2019
Ultra ultrasound to revolutionise technology
A new and extremely sensitive method of measuring ultrasound could revolutionise everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles. Researchers at The University of Queensland have combined modern nanofabrication* and nanophotonics* techniques to build the ultraprecise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.01.2019
Large Study Identifies Genetic Variants Linked to Risk Tolerance and Risky Behaviors
An international group that includes researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has identified 124 genetic variants associated with a person's willingness to take risks, as reported in a study published January 14 . The researchers emphasize that no variant on its own meaningfully affects a particular person's risk tolerance or penchant for making risky decisions — such as drinking, smoking, speeding — and non-genetic factors matter more for risk tolerance than genetic factors.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
Potential for risky behavior is also in your genes
As part of an international research project, a group of scientists from the University of Zurich found genetic variants associated with risk tolerance and risky behaviors. It is one of the first studies to link genetic variants with behavioral outcomes, which are relevant to social science research.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
How gut bacteria from infants could prevent food allergy
New research shows that healthy infants have intestinal bacteria that prevent the development of food allergies, findings that could impact the treatment of a disease that now affects 15 million Americans. Researchers from the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Naples Federico II in Italy discovered that when gut microbes from healthy human infants were transplanted into germ-free mice, the animals were protected from an allergic reaction when exposed to cow's milk.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
A metabolic checkpoint for embryonic stem cell differentiation
Upon exit from self-renewal, embryonic cell stems differentiate into different types of tissues - a process regulated by various complex mechanisms. Recent work published by the Betschinger group shows the importance of the lysosome - which is directly associated with cellular metabolism and nutrition - in developmental progression.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Predicting and preventing preterm births
Each year, 15 million babies worldwide are born prematurely, arriving at least three weeks before their due dates. Globally, prematurity is the largest cause of death before age 5, and even with excellent medical care, children who survive can have lasting physical, developmental and cognitive challenges.

Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
Microbes screened with a new microfluidic process might be used in power generation or environmental cleanup. Living in extreme conditions requires creative adaptations. For certain species of bacteria that exist in oxygen-deprived environments, this means finding a way to breathe that doesn't involve oxygen.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2019
Gene-editing tool now being used to develop better antibiotics
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jason Peters, (608) 265-6744, jason.peters [at] wisc (p) edu × A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher and his collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
A new drug delays motor neurone disease progression and improves cognitive and clinical symptoms according to trial results announced by a spin-out company from the Florey and University of Melbourne. A new drug developed by scientists at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience , and the School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute at the University of Melbourne has dramatically improved clinical and cognitive symptoms of motor neurone disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Brain's 'support cells' help mammals to keep time
Brain’s ’support cells’ help mammals to keep time
'Caretaker' cells which support neurons in the brain play more of an active role in circadian rhythms and animal behaviour than previously thought. Astrocytes are star-shaped nerve cells found in the brain and spinal cord that were thought to support neurons in regulating circadian rhythms - the body's internal 24-hour 'clock'.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work
In all the noise that comprises our national news landscape these days, noise itself doesn't often rise to the level of news. That changed in 2016 when U.S. diplomats stationed in Cuba in October repeatedly reported hearing high-pitched sounds that were followed by hearing loss and other medical symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
Researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
UCLA researchers led by Dr. Donald Kohn have created a method for modifying blood stem cells to reverse the genetic mutation that causes a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome called IPEX. The gene therapy, which was tested in mice, is similar to the technique Kohn has used to cure patients with another immune disease, severe combined immune deficiency, or SCID, also known as bubble baby disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Immune system’s front-line defense freezes bacteria in their tracks
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE × In the moments leading up to assault by a short, peculiar peptide, the bacteria are happily growing, their DNA jiggling around the cell in the semi-random motions characteristic of life. Seconds later, the jiggling stops. Life grinds to a halt. Some 100 million peptides - short chunks of amino acids, the basic units of proteins - by the name of LL-37 have invaded the cell, where, with strong electric charges, they've bound tightly to the machinery driving the cell, immobilizing and killing it.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Giving Cas9 an 'on' switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
Giving Cas9 an ’on’ switch for better control of CRISPR gene editing
CRISPR-Cas9 is a revolutionary tool in part because of its versatility: created by bacteria to chew up viruses, it works equally well in human cells to do all sorts of genetic tricks, including cutting and pasting DNA, making pinpoint mutations and activating or inactivating a gene. UC Berkeley researchers have now made it even more versatile by giving it an "on" switch, allowing users to keep the Cas9 gene editor turned off in all cells except its designated target.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.01.2019
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Turbocharger for the cell machinery
Researchers of the University of Bern have discovered a new molecular regulatory mechanism in unicellular parasites which has never before been observed. RNA fragments do not act as brakes in the cell apparatus, but on the contrary as "stimulants": they boost protein production after periods of stress.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2019
Speeding up genetic diagnosis of Huntington’s disease
Elongated segments of DNA cause Huntington's disease and certain other disorders of the brain. Researchers have developed a method to determine the length of the mutated genes quickly and easily. People with Huntington's disease suffer from jerky body movements and decreasing mental abilities. The condition usually leads to death 15-20 years after diagnosis.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.01.2019
How Drugs Can Minimize the Side Effects of Chemotherapy
Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of the receptor that causes nausea and vomiting as a result of cancer chemotherapy. The study explains for the first time why some drugs work particularly well in ameliorating these side effects. The results also provide important insights into how to develop compounds to effectively tackle other disorders.