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Life Sciences - Apr 25
Life Sciences
Intestinal organoids are three-dimensional structures derived from a single intestinal stem cell. They are great tools for applications ranging from fundamental biology to personalized and regenerative medicine. However, despite their relevance in research, it is still unclear how a single cell can give rise to a fully formed organoid.
Social Sciences - Apr 25

A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds.

Health - Apr 25

Think you should slow down as you get older? Think again! Weight-bearing and muscle strengthening exercises are important for building bone strength and preventing osteoporosis, however, new research shows that even just getting your 10,000 steps a day can be important for keeping your bones strong.

Environment - Apr 25
Environment

In 2017, more than 7,500 ecotoxicological tests were carried out on fish in Switzerland alone with the aim of protecting humans, animals and the environment.

Social Sciences - Apr 25

A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds.


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Life Sciences - Health - 25.04.2019
Intestinal organoid development mimics regeneration
Intestinal organoid development mimics regeneration
Intestinal organoids are three-dimensional structures derived from a single intestinal stem cell. They are great tools for applications ranging from fundamental biology to personalized and regenerative medicine. However, despite their relevance in research, it is still unclear how a single cell can give rise to a fully formed organoid.

Social Sciences - 25.04.2019
School choice does not achieve social mix across schools
A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Research by the University of Bristol and Cardiff University, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shows that far from encouraging integration and equal opportunity, choice-based systems are associated with higher levels of pupil segregation; potentially leading to schools that are more homogenous in their social composition.

Environment - 25.04.2019
Alternative to animal experiments: Fish cell test internationally certified
Alternative to animal experiments: Fish cell test internationally certified
In 2017, more than 7,500 ecotoxicological tests were carried out on fish in Switzerland alone with the aim of protecting humans, animals and the environment. For many years, Eawag has been researching alternatives in order to reduce or even replace fish experiments. One of these alternatives involves experiments with a gill cell line of rainbow trout (RTgill W1 cell line), which can be used to reliably determine the acute toxicity of water samples and many chemicals to fish.

Health - 25.04.2019
How to keep your bones strong
Think you should slow down as you get older? Think again! Weight-bearing and muscle strengthening exercises are important for building bone strength and preventing osteoporosis, however, new research shows that even just getting your 10,000 steps a day can be important for keeping your bones strong.

Social Sciences - 25.04.2019
School choice does not achieve social mix across schools
A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Research by Cardiff University and the University of Bristol, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shows that far from encouraging integration and equal opportunity, choice-based systems are associated with higher levels of pupil segregation; potentially leading to schools that are more homogenous in their social composition.

Health - 25.04.2019
One in two Swiss people will have smoked weed by 2045
One in two Swiss people will have smoked weed by 2045
Three decades from now, nearly half of the Swiss population will have had some experience with cannabis use. According to a new study by the University of Zurich, the number of active users will rise as well, increasing by 50% compared to 2015 - unless the government establishes new regulations. Countries such as Canada and Uruguay have introduced new paradigms when it comes to regulating the sale and consumption of cannabis.

Environment - 25.04.2019
EPFL helps revitalize Sarine River habitats downstream of Rossens dam
EPFL helps revitalize Sarine River habitats downstream of Rossens dam
Researchers at EPFL conducted a large-scale experiment downstream of Rossens arch dam, employing a laboratory-developed method to successfully preserve wildlife habitats.  The absence of natural flood events means that, downstream of dams, rivers always flow at the same rate. The channel bed silts up as time passes, and the lack of sediment replenishment degrades fish and invertebrate habitats and causes species diversity to decline.  Until recently, this very fate had befallen the Sarine River downstream of the Rossens arch dam in Fribourg Canton.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.04.2019
Astroparticle physicists observe the longest half-life ever directly measured
Astroparticle physicists observe the longest half-life ever directly measured
The universe is almost 14 billion years old. An inconceivable length of time by human standards - yet compared to some physical processes, it is but a moment. There are radioactive nuclei that decay on much longer time scales. An international team of scientists has now directly measured the rarest decay process ever recorded in a detector.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.04.2019
Researchers Observe Slowest Atom Decay Ever Measured
Researchers Observe Slowest Atom Decay Ever Measured
The XENON1T detector is mainly used to detect dark matter particles deep underground. But a research team led by Zurich physicists, among others, has now managed to observe an extremely rare process using the detector - the decay of the Xenon-124 atom, which has an enormously long half-life of 1.8 x 10^22 years.

Environment - Business / Economics - 24.04.2019
Renewable energy mandates reduce carbon dioxide emissions-but at a cost
As states take the lead in confronting climate change, their flagship policy is a program that requires that a certain percentage of the state's electricity come from renewable sources. But a new working paper co-authored by University of Chicago scholars found that these popular programs-enacted in 29 states and the District of Columbia-are inefficient in reducing carbon emissions and come at a high cost to consumers.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.04.2019
Scientists measure half-life of element that’s longer than the age of the universe
Deep under an Italian mountainside, a giant detector filled with tons of liquid xenon has been looking for dark matter-particles of a mysterious substance whose effects we can see in the universe, but which no one has ever directly observed. Along the way, however, the detector caught another scientific unicorn: the decay of atoms of xenon-124-the rarest process ever observed in the universe.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 24.04.2019
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Around three years ago, researchers on an Antarctic expedition, including Münster University palaeobotanist Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur , made an incredible discovery in northern Victoria Land. They found the 200 million-year-old footprint of an extinct reptile. The researchers have now published their findings from the hand-sized footprint in the journal “Polar Research”.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.04.2019
Evidence of heart injury in ’healthy’ people may lead to more effective treatment
New evidence of heart injury found in apparently healthy people could help pave the way for better long-term monitoring of cardiac health and personalised approaches to treatment, scientists say. Their findings appear today in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation, based on research conducted at the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Oxford, New South Wales and Johns Hopkins University.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.04.2019
Rapid destruction of Earth-like atmospheres by young stars
Rapid destruction of Earth-like atmospheres by young stars
Researchers show young stars rapidly destroy Earth-like Nitrogen dominated atmospheres The discoveries of thousands of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system has made questions about the potential for life to form on these planets fundamentally important in modern science. Fundamentally important for the habitability of a planet is whether or not it can hold onto an atmosphere, which requires that the atmosphere is not completely lost early in the lifetime of the planet.

Health - 24.04.2019
Parents reassured febrile seizures following vaccination not dangerous
University of Sydney research finds that febrile seizures after vaccination are rare, not serious and are no different to febrile seizures due to other causes, such as from a virus. New research from the University of Sydney has found the severity of febrile seizures following vaccination is no different to febrile seizures from another cause, such as from a virus, and that the majority of seizures are short-lived, self-resolving and don't require ongoing treatment.

Health - 24.04.2019
Elderberries could help minimise flu symptoms
A group of chemical and biomolecular engineers has determined that elderberries can help the fight against influenza, by reducing symptoms and severity of the virus. Folk medicines and herbal products have been used for millennia to combat a whole range of ailments, at times to the chagrin of modern scientists who have struggled to explain their medicinal benefits.

Health - 23.04.2019
Low mobility predicts hospital readmission in older heart attack patients
Close to 20% of elderly adults who have suffered a heart attack will be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Performance on a simple mobility test is the best predictor of whether an elderly heart attack patient will be readmitted, a Yale-led study reports. Appearing in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, the study describes the first risk model for hospital readmission specifically developed for older heart attack patients.

Computer Science / Telecom - 23.04.2019
Computer scientists design way to close ’backdoors’ in AI-based security systems
It sounds like a plot out of a spy novel, with a touch of cyberpunk: An agent approaches a secure location, protected by a facial recognition system, accessible only to a head of state or CEO. Flashing an unusually shaped earring, the agent tricks the system into thinking they're that VIP, opening the door and exposing the secrets inside.

Materials Science - 23.04.2019
Influence of the cathode on the lithium metal anode
The demand for high-energy batteries, in particular for the automotive industry, is increasing, and with it the research interest in battery technologies, which could determine the future market. A promising technology are secondary lithium metal batteries (LMBs), which combine lithium metal as an anode with, for example, cathode materials containing lithium ions.

Life Sciences - 23.04.2019
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Our actions are driven by “internal states” such as anxiety, stress or thirst - which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. How such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, including sub-cortical structures such as the amygdala, is unknown. In a study recently published in Science, the group of Andreas Lüthi used a deep brain imaging technique to monitor amygdala activity in active mice and revealed the neuronal dynamics encoding behavioral states.
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