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Results 21 - 40 of 184.


Physics - Materials Science - 20.11.2019
The Beauty of Imperfections: Linking Atomic Defects to 2D Materials' Electronic Properties
The Beauty of Imperfections: Linking Atomic Defects to 2D Materials’ Electronic Properties
Scientists at Berkeley Lab reveal oxygen's hidden talent for filling in atomic gaps in TMDs; and the surprising role of electron spin in conductivity Like any material, atomically thin, 2D semiconductors known as TMDs or transition metal dichalcogenides are not perfect, but their imperfections can actually be a good thing.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 18.11.2019
Alliance for additive manufacturing
Alliance for additive manufacturing
TUM, Oerlikon and Linde develop high-strength lightweight aluminum-based alloy New research alliance for additive manufacturing Together with the Swiss technology group Oerlikon and the industrial gas manufacturer Linde, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has entered into a research alliance for additive manufacturing (AM).

Physics - Materials Science - 14.11.2019
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
A new type of material generates electrical current very efficiently from temperature differences. This allows sensors and small processors to supply themselves with energy wirelessly. Thermoelectric materials can convert heat into electrical energy. This is due to the so-called Seebeck effect: If there is a temperature difference between the two ends of such a material, electrical voltage can be generated and current can start to flow.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 14.11.2019
Lifelike chemistry created in lab search for ways to study origin of life
The researchers subjected their chemical soups to a form of selection by taking a small amount of material from one vial and placing it in a new vial with fresh pyrite and chemicals. After multiple generations, they found evidence of chemical networks, represented in yellow, spreading quick enough to avoid dilution.

Materials Science - History / Archeology - 13.11.2019
Finest handwork
Finest handwork
In autumn 2017, the archaeological service of the Canton of Berne was amazed when two private individuals delivered a crusted lump of metal. The bronze hand of PrÍles, decorated with a ribbon of gold, turned out to be the oldest bronze sculpture of a human body part in Central Europe. But where did the metals of the sensational find come from? Empa researchers were involved in the investigation.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 12.11.2019
A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition
A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition
Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a new method for atomic layer deposition, a technique commonly used in high-quality microelectronics. The new method can be used in materials with larger surfaces much more cheaply than current approaches, while preserving quality and efficiency. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) involves stacking layers of atoms on top of each other like pancakes.

Materials Science - 12.11.2019
A fast and precise look into fibre-reinforced composites
A fast and precise look into fibre-reinforced composites
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have improved a method for small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to such an extent that it can now be used in the development or quality control of novel fibre-reinforced composites. This means that in the future, such materials can be investigated not only with X-rays from especially powerful sources such as the Swiss Light Source SLS, but also with those from conventional X-ray tubes.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 07.11.2019
Go With the Flow: Scientists Design Better Batteries for a Renewable Energy Grid
Go With the Flow: Scientists Design Better Batteries for a Renewable Energy Grid
New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind How do you store renewable energy so it's there when you need it, even when the sun isn't shining or the wind isn't blowing? Giant batteries designed for the electrical grid - called flow batteries, which store electricity in tanks of liquid electrolyte - could be the answer, but so far utilities have yet to find a cost-effective battery that can reliably power thousands of homes throughout a lifecycle of 10 to 20 years.

Materials Science - Transport - 07.11.2019
UK needs to act to prevent electric vehicle battery waste mountain - new study
Recycling technologies for end-of-life lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are not keeping pace with the rapid rise of electric vehicles, storing up a potentially huge waste management problem for the future, according to a new study. A review of lithium ion battery recycling led by the University of Birmingham suggests that, while electric vehicles (EVs) offer a solution for cutting pollution, governments and industry need to act now to develop a robust recycling infrastructure to meet future recycling need.

Physics - Materials Science - 05.11.2019
World-Leading Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atoms in Their 'Neighborhoods'
World-Leading Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atoms in Their ’Neighborhoods’
Taking the technology to low temperatures could enable advances in materials science and other fields By Jessica Scully Researchers use electron microscopy to produce high-resolution images at the atomic scale of everything from composite nanomaterials to single proteins. The technology provides invaluable information on the texture, chemistry, and structure of these materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 05.11.2019
4D-STEM Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atomic 'Neighborhoods'
4D-STEM Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atomic ’Neighborhoods’
Scientists use powerful 4D-STEM electron microscopy technique to map out the best atomic 'hangouts' in high-performance materials W e can directly see the hidden world of atoms thanks to electron microscopes, first developed in the 1930s. Today, electron microscopes, which use beams of electrons to illuminate and magnify a sample, have become even more sophisticated, allowing scientists to take real-world snapshots of materials with a resolution of less than half the diameter of a hydrogen atom.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.11.2019
Light-based 'tractor beam' assembles materials at the nanoscale
Light-based ’tractor beam’ assembles materials at the nanoscale
Modern construction is a precision endeavor. Builders must use components manufactured to meet specific standards - such as beams of a desired composition or rivets of a specific size. The building industry relies on manufacturers to create these components reliably and reproducibly in order to construct secure bridges and sound skyscrapers.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.11.2019
Scientists spy unstable semiconductors
Scientists from Cardiff University have, for the first time, spotted previously unseen “instabilities” on the surface of a common compound semiconductor material. The findings could potentially have profound consequences for the development of future materials in the electronic devices that power our daily lives.

Physics - Materials Science - 31.10.2019
New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells
New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells
People can be good at hiding strain, and we're not alone. Solar cells have the same talent. For a solar cell, physical strain within its microscopic crystalline structure can interrupt its core function - converting sunlight into electricity - by essentially "losing” energy as heat. For an emerging type of solar cell, known as lead halide perovskites, reducing and taming this loss is key to improving efficiency and putting the perovskites on par with today's silicon solar cells.

Materials Science - Innovation - 30.10.2019
Advanced carbon materials research boosted by new funding
Advanced carbon materials research boosted by new funding
The University of Sydney's research collaboration with Hazer Group has received an additional $811,712 in funding following a new partnership with the Innovative Manufacturing CRC. University of Sydney Chemical Engineer Professor Yuan Chen 's ongoing research into developing and optimising advanced carbon materials (ACM) in partnership with Hazer Group has been bolstered with an additional $811,712 in funding awarded by the Innovative Manufacturing CRC (IMCRC).

Physics - Materials Science - 24.10.2019
Living on the Edge: How a 2D Material Got Its Shape
Living on the Edge: How a 2D Material Got Its Shape
Scientists at Berkeley Lab discover that nanoparticles' 'edge energy' gets them in 2D shape for energy storage applications Ever since its discovery in 2004, graphene - an atomically thin material with amazing strength and electrical properties - has inspired scientists around the world to design new 2D materials to serve a broad range of applications, from renewable energy and catalysts to microelectronics.

Health - Materials Science - 23.10.2019
Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium
Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium
ETH researchers have recently been able to monitor the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium alloys at the nanoscale over a time scale of a few seconds to many hours. This is an important step towards accurately predicting how fast implants are resorbed by the body to enable the development of tailored materials for temporary implant applications.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 21.10.2019
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
With a new process developed at TU Wien (Vienna), living cells can be integrated into fine structures created in a 3D printer - extremely fast and with very high resolution. Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework.

Materials Science - Physics - 15.10.2019
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behaviour and identify the important new ones. Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , challenge the accepted wisdom on wetting and drying phase behaviour.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.10.2019
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
A very special kind of light is emitted by tungsten diselenide layers. The reason for this has been unclear. Now an explanation has been found at TU Wien (Vienna). It is an exotic phenomenon that nobody was able to explain for years: when energy is supplied to a thin layer of the material tungsten diselenide, it begins to glow in a highly unusual fashion.

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