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Pharmacology



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Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. The study builds on promising results from the Centre for Human Brain Health at the University of Birmingham which suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation can improve the success of rehabilitation for non-responsive patients.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.10.2019
Global trial is first clear evidence that a widely available drug reduces head injury deaths
A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20 per cent depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The research, published in The Lancet, showed that tranexamic acid (TXA), a drug that prevents bleeding into the brain by inhibiting blood clot breakdown, has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Computational "Match Game" Identifies Potential Antibiotics
CMU software tool speeds discovery using microbial datasets Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a software tool that can play a high-speed "Match Game" to identify bioactive molecules and the microbial genes that produce them so they can be evaluated as possible antibiotics and other therapeutic agents.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
By identifying a protein that helps regulate blood glucose and lipids, researchers at UNIGE hope for the rapid development of treatments more effective than current insulin therapy. Insulin, a hormone essential for regulating blood sugar and lipids, is normally produced by pancreatic - cells. In many people with diabetes, however, pancreatic cells are not (or no longer) functional, causing a chronic and potentially fatal insulin deficiency that can only be controlled through daily insulin injections.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 16.10.2019
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
A sample of estuarine mud taken 16 years ago has yielded a potential new class of painkiller as potent as opioids, but without their disadvantages. Researchers from The University of Queensland and University of Sydney have filed a patent application for the potential drug, which is a modified version of a molecule found in a Penicillium fungus, and published their results in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA .

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 15.10.2019
Estuarine waters hold promise in global pain-relief hunt
In a world first, a team of Australian-led researchers has discovered a uniquely shaped fungus in pristine waters, which may mimic opioids with fewer side-effects. It had been hoped that such a molecular structure might exist. The worldwide search for an opioid alternative has made a leap forward - with a scientific discovery in an Australian fungus indicating effective pain relief and the potential for a safer less addictive drug, helping address the opioid epidemic of deaths by overdose.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?
Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?
Scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Lyon have discovered which molecule is held responsible for tissue necrosis due to an infarctus, and how to reduce the tissue damage by 30% in mice. Each year, heart attacks kill almost 10 million people in the world, and more than 6 million die from stroke.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.10.2019
Inactive receptor renders immunotherapies ineffective
Inactive receptor renders immunotherapies ineffective
The aim of immunotherapies is to enable the immune system once again to fight cancer on its own. Drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors are already in clinical use for this purpose. However, they are only effective in about one third of patients. Based on analysis of human tissue samples, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered one reason why this is so: an inactive receptor in cancer cells prevents the drugs from reactivating the immune system.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
A Yale-developed drug shows promise as immune therapy for cancer
A therapy developed by Yale researchers stimulates immune cells to shrink or kill tumors in mice, according to a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The therapy is effective alone or in combination with existing cancer immunotherapies, and it appears to have lasting effects, the researchers said.

Social Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
Wastewater reveals socioeconomic link to diet and drug consumption
Wastewater reveals socioeconomic link to diet and drug consumption
The consumption of caffeine, citrus, vitamin B and dietary fibre is higher in communities with higher socioeconomic status, according to new research from The University of Queensland. A study led by Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences (QAEHS) researchers uses wastewater to show the correlation between socioeconomics and diet and drug consumption.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Cannabis Research Buds Out in New Directions, Arthritis to Insomnia
With 33 states and the District of Columbia having legalized medical marijuana, it was inevitable that there would be much talk of its therapeutic benefits, real or imagined. But lost in the equally inevitable hype has been hard scientific proof. For almost two decades, the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) at UC San Diego has been conducting such research, for much of that time largely alone and often, given the controversial nature of the subject, with limited resources.

Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Birmingham health research academics call for NHS to act on mental health patient feedback
Researchers from the University of Birmingham are today making a series of recommendations for improving the way that NHS mental health trusts collect and use patient feedback to improve the quality of care for mental health inpatients. As part of a collaborative study funded by NIHR, a team from the Universities of Birmingham, Warwick , Sheffield and Queen Mary University of London , together with the Mental Health Foundation interviewed staff and patients across NHS mental health trusts in England and found that few are collecting patient feedback to actively improve services.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2019
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients' blood and biopsies
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients’ blood and biopsies
Early signs that a patient's lung cancer may spread and become untreatable can be picked up in samples of their blood and tumour, according to a trio of papers co-led by UCL. The three studies, published , are all part of Cancer Research UK's 14million TRACERx project, which aims to understand how lung cancer cells change over time and become resistant to treatment.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 07.10.2019
How Plants React to Fungi
How Plants React to Fungi
Using special receptors, plants recognize when they are at risk of fungal infection. This new finding could help cultivate resistant crops and reduce pesticide usage. Plants are under constant pressure from fungi and other microorganisms. The air is full of fungal spores, which attach themselves to plant leaves and germinate, especially in warm and humid weather.

Pharmacology - Health - 07.10.2019
Patient-aligned care reduces unwanted medications, tests for older adults
An emerging approach to health care that focuses decision-making on older patients' health goals and care preferences can reduce unwanted and unhelpful treatment, such as medications and diagnostic tests, say Yale researchers. It can also lessen treatment burden, according to their new study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Pharmacology - Health - 07.10.2019
California program is a good step toward coordinating care for high-needs patients
An evaluation by UCLA researchers has found that a California program launched in 2016 has been a positive step toward providing better-coordinated health care for people insured by Medicaid. Initial findings from the ongoing analysis were published today by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.10.2019
Fat cells are used to deliver drug that suppresses tumor growth in mice
FINDINGS In a study with mice, researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new mechanism for delivering a drug that can help stop tumors from growing and keep cancer from recurring. The scientists found that they could reengineer adipocytes — fat cells that provide fatty acids with the energy needed for tumors to grow and spread — to reverse their role in tumor development and deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to the area of the body immediately surrounding the tumor.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.10.2019
Codeine misuse in Australia reduced by prescription-only changes
The move to prescription-only codeine in Australia has seen a 50 percent reduction in the monthly rate of codeine-related poisoning calls and halved codeine sales, finds new research led by the University of Sydney. The move to prescription-only codeine in Australia has seen a 50 percent reduction in the monthly rate of codeine-related poisoning calls and halved codeine sales, finds new research led by the University of Sydney.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.10.2019
New drug helps combat metabolic syndrome
A new drug developed at Yale reduces a host of abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome, an obesity-born condition that afflicts one of three adults in the United States, researchers report Oct. 2 Translational Medicine. Metabolic syndrome is marked by insulin resistance leading to high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist, abnormal blood cholesterol or triglyceride levels, and increased fat in the liver, a condition referred to as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 02.10.2019
CompBio’s Mohimani Going Big To Find New Antibiotics
NIH New Innovator Award supports global search of microbial communities Hosein Mohimani has a knack for finding ever-faster ways of searching giant databases in search of potential therapeutic drugs. Now, the computer scientist is trying a new approach in which the size of the databases isn't something to be conquered, but a feature he uses to his advantage.
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