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Results 101 - 120 of 433.


Health - Pharmacology - 24.10.2019
Cells linked to leading cause of blindness in elderly
Age-related macular degeneration is one of the leading causes of blindness in the elderly, affecting more than 2 million people in the United States and leading to progressive loss of central vision. Genome wide studies have identified almost three dozen genes that play a role in the disease, but exactly where in the eye they inflict damage was not well known.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.10.2019
Sentinel lymph node biopsy has no benefits for stage zero breast cancer
Older women with a very early, non-invasive breast cancer known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) gain no long-term benefit from undergoing a sentinel lymph node biopsy to see if the cancer has spread, new research by the Yale School of Public Health has found.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.10.2019
20th century views and responses to drug use are no longer fit for purpose
A report from The Lancet calls for a new international approach to drug use - using evidence-based policies, which adapt faster, and respond more humanely and effectively to new drugs and their changing availability and patterns of use. The five-paper Series publishes as the opioid crisis continues, cannabis legalisation expands, global stimulant problems grow, and the number of new psychoactive substances (NPS) identified continues to increase.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 23.10.2019
Antibiotics with Novel Mechanism of Action Discovered
Many life-threatening bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to existing antibiotics. Swiss researchers co-headed by the University of Zurich have now discovered a new class of antibiotics with a unique spectrum of activity and mechanism of action - a major step in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.10.2019
Trial will look at new Parkinson’s treatment for frequent falls
Researchers have been awarded funding to trial a new treatment for frequent falls in patients with advanced Parkinson's. In Parkinson's disease, some parts of the brain begin to deteriorate, leading to symptoms including balance problems, which can increase the chances of falls. A team from Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust have been awarded 250,000 from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to trial a surgical implant that alters nerve activity, which could improve movement and reduce the number of falls.

Pharmacology - 23.10.2019
Drugs are consumed everywhere, but not always the same ones
Drugs are consumed everywhere, but not always the same ones
This spring, as they have now done for the past eight years, the international research team SCORE (Sewage analysis CORe group Europe), co-founded by Christoph Ort from Eawag, once again examined the wastewater from European metropolises for four illegal drugs - amphetamine, cocaine, MDMA (Ecstasy) and methamphetamine.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Detecting the (almost) undetectable: new cancer alliance
Detecting the (almost) undetectable: new cancer alliance
UCL research teams are part of a new transatlantic research alliance to develop radical new strategies and technologies to detect cancer at its earliest stage. Cancer Research UK is the lead funder of the International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection (ACED), a 55m investment bringing together UCL, Canary Center at Stanford University, the University of Cambridge, the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, and the University of Manchester.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Researchers identify a new way to target treatment-resistant cancers
An international team of researchers has found a different way cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, suggesting a new target for drugs. Chemotherapy kills cancers cells by preventing them from multiplying and by inducing ‘cell death', a natural process that can be enhanced with drugs. One form of cell death, called ferroptosis - iron-dependent cell death - is caused by the degradation of fats (lipids) that make up the cell membrane.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. The study builds on promising results from the Centre for Human Brain Health at the University of Birmingham which suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation can improve the success of rehabilitation for non-responsive patients.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.10.2019
Global trial is first clear evidence that a widely available drug reduces head injury deaths
A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20 per cent depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The research, published in The Lancet, showed that tranexamic acid (TXA), a drug that prevents bleeding into the brain by inhibiting blood clot breakdown, has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Computational "Match Game" Identifies Potential Antibiotics
CMU software tool speeds discovery using microbial datasets Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a software tool that can play a high-speed "Match Game" to identify bioactive molecules and the microbial genes that produce them so they can be evaluated as possible antibiotics and other therapeutic agents.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
By identifying a protein that helps regulate blood glucose and lipids, researchers at UNIGE hope for the rapid development of treatments more effective than current insulin therapy. Insulin, a hormone essential for regulating blood sugar and lipids, is normally produced by pancreatic - cells. In many people with diabetes, however, pancreatic cells are not (or no longer) functional, causing a chronic and potentially fatal insulin deficiency that can only be controlled through daily insulin injections.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 16.10.2019
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
A sample of estuarine mud taken 16 years ago has yielded a potential new class of painkiller as potent as opioids, but without their disadvantages. Researchers from The University of Queensland and University of Sydney have filed a patent application for the potential drug, which is a modified version of a molecule found in a Penicillium fungus, and published their results in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA .

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 15.10.2019
Estuarine waters hold promise in global pain-relief hunt
In a world first, a team of Australian-led researchers has discovered a uniquely shaped fungus in pristine waters, which may mimic opioids with fewer side-effects. It had been hoped that such a molecular structure might exist. The worldwide search for an opioid alternative has made a leap forward - with a scientific discovery in an Australian fungus indicating effective pain relief and the potential for a safer less addictive drug, helping address the opioid epidemic of deaths by overdose.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?
Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?
Scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Lyon have discovered which molecule is held responsible for tissue necrosis due to an infarctus, and how to reduce the tissue damage by 30% in mice. Each year, heart attacks kill almost 10 million people in the world, and more than 6 million die from stroke.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.10.2019
Inactive receptor renders immunotherapies ineffective
Inactive receptor renders immunotherapies ineffective
The aim of immunotherapies is to enable the immune system once again to fight cancer on its own. Drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors are already in clinical use for this purpose. However, they are only effective in about one third of patients. Based on analysis of human tissue samples, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered one reason why this is so: an inactive receptor in cancer cells prevents the drugs from reactivating the immune system.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
A Yale-developed drug shows promise as immune therapy for cancer
A therapy developed by Yale researchers stimulates immune cells to shrink or kill tumors in mice, according to a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The therapy is effective alone or in combination with existing cancer immunotherapies, and it appears to have lasting effects, the researchers said.

Social Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
Wastewater reveals socioeconomic link to diet and drug consumption
Wastewater reveals socioeconomic link to diet and drug consumption
The consumption of caffeine, citrus, vitamin B and dietary fibre is higher in communities with higher socioeconomic status, according to new research from The University of Queensland. A study led by Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences (QAEHS) researchers uses wastewater to show the correlation between socioeconomics and diet and drug consumption.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Cannabis Research Buds Out in New Directions, Arthritis to Insomnia
With 33 states and the District of Columbia having legalized medical marijuana, it was inevitable that there would be much talk of its therapeutic benefits, real or imagined. But lost in the equally inevitable hype has been hard scientific proof. For almost two decades, the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) at UC San Diego has been conducting such research, for much of that time largely alone and often, given the controversial nature of the subject, with limited resources.

Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Birmingham health research academics call for NHS to act on mental health patient feedback
Researchers from the University of Birmingham are today making a series of recommendations for improving the way that NHS mental health trusts collect and use patient feedback to improve the quality of care for mental health inpatients. As part of a collaborative study funded by NIHR, a team from the Universities of Birmingham, Warwick , Sheffield and Queen Mary University of London , together with the Mental Health Foundation interviewed staff and patients across NHS mental health trusts in England and found that few are collecting patient feedback to actively improve services.

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