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Pharmacology



Results 21 - 40 of 216.


Pharmacology - Health - 29.07.2019
Explainer: What is Ligandrol and how does it work?
Associate Professor Nial Wheate from the School of Pharmacy comments on the history of Ligandrol, how it works and news this week about the drug. Australian freestyle swimmer Shayna Jack tested positive to the banned substance Ligandrol in late June , before competing at the world swimming championships in South Korea this month.

Pharmacology - Health - 27.07.2019
Global scheme to cut price of expensive hepatitis drugs boosts treatment rate
An initiative to improve access to high-cost hepatitis C treatments in poorer countries has resulted in more people being treated for the disease. This is the finding of a new study from Imperial College London , published in the journal The Lancet Global Health. The global scheme, which allows the patented drugs to be manufactured under so-called voluntary licences, aims to ensure high cost medications are affordable to lower income nations.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.07.2019
Electrodes in remaining arms give amputees better control of prosthetics
Electrodes in remaining arms give amputees better control of prosthetics
Vienna and Imperial College London scientists implanted electrodes in amputees' stumps for better prosthetic control - with promising results. This early-stage research , on three men with above-elbow arm amputations, involved relocating nerves in their remaining arms before implanting wirelessly chargeable electrodes and fitting new prosthetic arms.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.07.2019
Serious falls are a health risk for adults under 65
Adults who take several prescription medications are more likely to experience serious falls, say Yale researchers and their co-authors in a new study. This heightened risk can affect middle-aged individuals - a population not typically viewed as vulnerable to debilitating or fatal falls, the researchers said.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.07.2019
Omega-6 fatty acid could help prevent heart disease
An omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid has the potential to help fight heart disease, finds a new study by researchers at Cardiff University in collaboration with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. With funding from the British Heart Foundation, the team found that dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, could halt the progression of atherosclerosis - one of the leading causes of heart disease.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 18.07.2019
New prebiotics: benefits without the downsides?
New prebiotics: benefits without the downsides?
Prebiotics are currently a preferred treatment for certain metabolic disorders, as they can restore the balance of dysfunctional gut microbiota, and improve the body's metabolism. However, these substances have to be used at high doses, which can result in patients experiencing bloating and flatulence.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.07.2019
Bacterial defence construction revealed in step forward for new antibiotics
Bacterial defence construction revealed in step forward for new antibiotics
A crucial step in the way bacteria construct their defences has been revealed by an international team, including a University of Queensland researcher. Institute for Molecular Bioscience 's researcher Professor Ian Henderson said the finding had opened up a new pathway for designing improved antibiotics.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.07.2019
Science of microdosing psychedelics ’remains patchy and anecdotal’, says review
The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence. The process, called microdosing, has been lauded by some, with high profile proponents in Silicon Valley. But to date, scientific evidence to support or even fully explore claims of the benefits and safety, has been lacking.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 11.07.2019
A novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes
Similar to insulin in humans, plants also produce peptide hormones that orchestrate internal processes and responses, including growth, development, and immunity. One of them is RALF23, which belongs to the large family of RALF plant peptides. Notably, the study revealed a novel recognition mechanism for the RALF23 peptide signals by plant receptors.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.07.2019
Reducing antibiotic use
Reducing antibiotic use
A simple finger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics for people with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study by researchers from Cardiff University, University of Oxford and King's College London. The team demonstrated that using a CRP finger-prick blood test resulted in 20% fewer people using antibiotics for COPD flare-ups.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.07.2019
Successful’T cell engineering with gene scissors
There are two forms of T cell therapy: either a recipient receives cells from a donor, or the recipient's own T cells are removed, genetically reprogrammed in a laboratory and unleashed against an infection or tumor in the body. While the first method has proven to be successful in clinical models, reprogramming T cells is still beset with problems.

Pharmacology - Health - 10.07.2019
Patients with mental health conditions denied access to ’best available’ stop smoking treatments
A new study from researchers at the universities of Bristol and Bath suggests that doctors should rethink which drugs they prescribe to help smokers with mental health conditions kick the habit. Their results highlight that the most effective drug at helping individuals to stop smoking is less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditions.

Pharmacology - 10.07.2019
Yale-developed scorecard promotes better clinical trial data sharing
A tool developed by researchers at Yale, Stanford, and Bioethics International can promote greater sharing of clinical trial data by pharmaceutical companies. While nearly one-third of the companies that the researchers assessed met standards for sharing data, others could be more transparent to the benefit of science and the public, the researchers said.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.07.2019
Best treatment for herniated disc
A herniated disc is painful - and the most frequent cause of spinal surgery. But is the selected treatment always the right one? New research results show that the clinical criteria - the comparison of two static images - are often not sufficient to make the best decision for the patient. Sudden back pain is often caused by a herniated disc.

Pharmacology - Health - 04.07.2019
Aims to improve acne in women
A new study is looking for women with acne in Bristol to take part in a new clinical trial. Led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Southampton the study will investigate whether a drug called spironolactone can help improve acne in women. Spironolactone is usually given to people for high blood pressure.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition
A type of blood pressure lowering medication, called a calcium-channel blocker, may be linked with increased risk of bowel condition diverticulosis. This condition causes small bulges or pouches to appear in the lining of the intestine. Particularly affecting the elderly (as many as 65 per cent of over 85s may be affected), diverticulosis can in some cases can lead to a medical emergency if the pouches become infected or burst.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition | Imperial News | Imperial College London
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition | Imperial News | Imperial College London
A type of blood pressure lowering medication, called a calcium-channel blocker, may be linked with increased risk of bowel condition diverticulosis. This condition causes small bulges or pouches to appear in the lining of the intestine. Particularly affecting the elderly (as many as 65 per cent of over 85s may be affected), diverticulosis can in some cases can lead to a medical emergency if the pouches become infected or burst.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.07.2019
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
A crowdsourcing project which uses thousands of idling smartphones has helped to uncover anti-cancer properties of everyday foods and medicines. The project, led by researchers at Imperial College London, uses artificial intelligence to crunch huge volumes of data on a ‘cloud computing' network of smartphones while they charge overnight.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 02.07.2019
Chemists give chance a helping hand
Chemists give chance a helping hand
Whether they are synthetic materials such as PET and Teflon, medicines or flavourings, life without synthetically produced compounds is barely conceivable in our everyday lives today. The chemical industry depends on efficient, long-term methods of producing synthetically derived molecules. For this purpose, chemists often use catalysts, i.e. additives with which they can facilitate and control chemical reactions.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.07.2019
Heart attack patients with diabetes may benefit from cholesterol-lowering drug
Injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes who have had a recent heart attack. Regular injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes and who have had a recent heart attack.

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