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Philosophy - 12.11.2019
When do children begin to recognize hypocrisy?
Practice what you preach. Suit your actions to your words. Walk the talk. Hypocrisy is ingrained as a moral failing for most adults, but when do children learn to make the same distinction? According to a new study from University of Chicago psychologists, the shift seems to happen early in elementary school.

Pharmacology - Philosophy - 06.11.2019
In Hunting for Cures, Ethics Can Strengthen Clinical Trials
Clinical trials provide the cornerstone for evaluating the safety and efficacy of new drugs and therapies to treat disease. While trials are designed to follow established ethical and regulatory requirements, Alex John London , the Clara L. West Professor of Ethics and Philosophy at Carnegie Mellon University, said he believes there is room for improvement.

Law - Philosophy - 05.11.2019
Lawyers asked to advise on unethical issues
Nearly half (45%) of in-house lawyers have been asked to advise on an action with debatable ethics, according to research by UCL. The research, published in a new report ' Which way is the wind blowing? Understanding the moral compass of in-house legal counsel' also found that 39% of in-house lawyers had been asked to advise on something which was potentially illegal.

Health - Philosophy - 06.05.2019
Security cameras in nursing homes aim to protect the vulnerable but present ethical dilemmas
For many people who care for aging parents, one solution is a safe, responsible nursing home. But an increasingly common means of ensuring that safety - security cameras installed by relatives - may do more harm than good, says Clara Berridge , an assistant professor of social work at the University of Washington.

Philosophy - 21.01.2019
Conforming to the beauty ideal to look younger, thinner, firmer and smoother becomes the norm - research finds
Beauty practices and standards are higher than ever with the pressure to achieve the ‘perfect' body now becoming a moral imperative, suggests research published by the University of Birmingham. Professor Heather Widdows , University of Birmingham argues in her new book Perfect Me: Beauty as an Ethical Ideal , published by Princeton University Press, that beauty ideals are becoming shared ethical ideals by which we judge ourselves and others as ‘good' or ‘bad'.

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