News 2019

« BACK

Physics



Results 101 - 120 of 441.


Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 29.08.2019
Entanglement sent over 50 km of optical fiber
Entanglement sent over 50 km of optical fiber
For the first time, a team led by Innsbruck physicist Ben Lanyon has sent a light particle entangled with matter over 50 km of optical fiber. This paves the way for the practical use of quantum networks and sets a milestone for a future quantum internet. The quantum internet promises absolutely tap-proof communication and powerful distributed sensor networks for new science and technology.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 28.08.2019
Providing a solution to the worst-ever prediction in physics
Providing a solution to the worst-ever prediction in physics
A UNIGE physicist has proposed a new approach to solving one of the biggest theoretical problems in physics: the cosmological constant. The cosmological constant, introduced a century ago by Albert Einstein in his theory of general relativity, is a thorn in the side of physicists. The difference between the theoretical prediction of this parameter and its measurement based on astronomical observations is of the order of 10121.

Materials Science - Physics - 28.08.2019
Next generation synthetic covalent 2-D materials unveiled
UAntwerp researchers from the CMT group, Dr. Mehmet Yagmurcukardes and Prof. Francois Peeters, in collaboration with a team from Manchester have uncovered novel 2D materials. (Nanowerk News) A team of researchers at the National Graphene Institute at The University of Manchester have developed a new method to synthesize 2D materials that are thought to be impossible or, at least, unobtainable by current technologies.

Physics - 28.08.2019
Engineers build advanced microprocessor out of carbon nanotubes
Engineers build advanced microprocessor out of carbon nanotubes
New approach harnesses the same fabrication processes used for silicon chips, offers key advance toward next-generation computers. Popular Mechanics reporter John Wenz explores the significance of MIT researchers developing a microprocessor out of carbon nanotubes. "Carbon nanotubes have been a promising material for next generation electronics for almost two decades now," says Prof. Max Shulaker.

Physics - Innovation - 27.08.2019
Particle Accelerators Drive Decades of Discoveries at Berkeley Lab and Beyond
Berkeley Lab's expertise in accelerator technologies has spiraled out from Ernest Lawrence's earliest cyclotron to advanced compact accelerators This video and accompanying article highlight the decades of discoveries, achievements and progress in particle accelerator R&D at Berkeley Lab.

Life Sciences - Physics - 27.08.2019
New biosensor provides insight into the stress behaviour of plants
New biosensor provides insight into the stress behaviour of plants
They are tiny signalling molecules that play important roles in many processes in living organisms. However, the exact function of these substances is often still unknown, which is why scientists are constantly on the lookout for new methods with which they can further investigate them. Researchers at the Universities of Münster and Nanjing (China) have developed such a method for an important messenger substance in plants, called phosphatidic acid.

Computer Science / Telecom - Physics - 27.08.2019
Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes
Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes
EPFL scientists have developed an algorithm that can determine whether a super-resolution microscope is operating at maximum resolution based on a single image. The method is compatible with all types of microscopes and could one day be a standard feature of automated models. Thanks to the advent of super-resolution microscopes some 30 years ago, scientists can observe subcellular structures, proteins and living tissue with unprecedented precision.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.08.2019
Water droplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide
Water droplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide
Despite its abundance, water retains a great many secrets. Among them, Stanford chemists have discovered, is that water microdroplets spontaneously produce hydrogen peroxide. Water is everywhere on Earth, but maybe that just gives it more space to hide its secrets. Its latest surprise, Stanford researchers report Aug.

Physics - Life Sciences - 26.08.2019
Scientists harness bacteria to create ’living’ liquid crystals
Liquid crystals are widely used in technologies such as displays, which manipulate their orientation to display colors across the spectrum. In traditional displays, liquid crystals are stationary and uniform, free of defects. But that stillness can be altered by adding bacteria to the crystals, creating what scientists and engineers call "living liquid crystals": materials that can act autonomously.

Physics - 22.08.2019
Visualising strong magnetic fields with neutrons
Visualising strong magnetic fields with neutrons
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method with which strong magnetic fields can be precisely measured. They use neutrons obtained from the SINQ spallation source. In the future, it will therefore be possible to measure the fields of magnets that are already installed in devices and thus are inaccessible by other probing techniques.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 22.08.2019
Quantum gravity's tangled time
Quantum gravity’s tangled time
The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. However, recently an international team of researchers led by physicists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences as well as the University of Queensland (AUS) and the Stevens Institute of Technology (USA) have combined the key elements of the two theories describing the flow of time and discovered that temporal order between events can exhibit genuine quantum features.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 21.08.2019
New theory explains earthquakes we can’t feel
Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks' pores. The Earth's subsurface is an extremely active place, where the movements and friction of plates deep underground shape our landscape and govern the intensity of hazards above.

Physics - Health - 21.08.2019
Deep learning enables scientists to identify cancer cells in blood in milliseconds
Researchers at UCLA and NantWorks have developed an artificial intelligence-powered device that detects cancer cells in a few milliseconds — hundreds of times faster than previous methods. With that speed, the invention could make it possible to extract cancer cells from blood immediately after they are detected, which could in turn help prevent the disease from spreading in the body.

Physics - Materials Science - 21.08.2019
A hallmark of superconductivity, beyond superconductivity itself
A hallmark of superconductivity, beyond superconductivity itself
'Electron pairing' found well above superconductor's critical temperature Physicists have found "electron pairing,” a hallmark feature of superconductivity, at temperatures and energies well above the critical threshold where superconductivity happens. Rice University's Doug Natelson , co-corresponding author of a paper about the work in this week's Nature, said the discovery of Cooper pairs of electrons "a bit above the critical temperature won't be 'crazy surprising' to some people.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.08.2019
Graphene nanoflakes: a new tool for precision medicine
Graphene nanoflakes: a new tool for precision medicine
Chemists funded by the SNSF have created a new compound for flexible drug delivery that specifically targets prostate cancer cells. Incorporating four different molecules, the compound prevents tumour cells from multiplying, can be detected by medical imaging and has staying power in the bloodstream.

Physics - Life Sciences - 19.08.2019
Making biominerals: nature’s recipe is old, evolved more than once
In recent years, scientists have teased out many of the secrets of biomineralization, the process by which sea urchins grow spines, mollusks build their shells and corals make their skeletons, not to mention how mammals and other animals make bones and teeth. The materials that animals make from scratch to build protective shells, razor sharp teeth, load-bearing bones and needlelike spines are some of the hardest and most durable substances known.

Physics - Innovation - 19.08.2019
"Qutrit": Complex quantum teleportation achieved for the first time
Austrian and Chinese scientists have succeeded in teleporting three-dimensional quantum states for the first time. High-dimensional teleportation could play an important role in future quantum computers. Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna have experimentally demonstrated what was previously only a theoretical possibility.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 19.08.2019
Lab-based dark energy experiment narrows search options for elusive force
An experiment to test a popular theory of dark energy has found no evidence of new forces, placing strong constraints on related theories. Dark energy is the name given to an unknown force that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate. It is very exciting to be able to discover something about the evolution of the universe using a table-top experiment in a London basement.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.08.2019
Hydrogen induces high-temperature superconductivity in a monolayer material
UAntwerp researchers from the CMT group, Dr Jonas Bekaert and Prof Milorad Milosevic, in collaboration with Swedish researchers have predicted that a atomically thin layer of hydrogen will boost the critical temperature of a thin superconductor to above a hundred kelvin. Hydrogen-rich bulk superconducting materials have recently exhibited record-breaking critical temperatures, nearing the ambient temperature and thereby promising a major technological impact on the society.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.08.2019
Atomically thin heat shield protects electronics
Atomically thin heat shield protects electronics
Atomically thin materials developed by Stanford researchers could create heat-shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact. Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |