News 2019

« BACK

Physics



Results 141 - 160 of 435.
« Previous 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... 22 Next »


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.07.2019
Milky Way’s central black hole puts Einstein’s theories to the test
An artistic visualization of the star S0-2 as it passes by the supermassive black hole at the galactic center, which has warped the geometry of space and time. As the star gets closer to the supermassive black hole, its light undergoes a gravitational redshift that is predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.07.2019
How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals
How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals
Researchers try a trick for complete 3D analysis of submicron crystals The 3D analysis of crystal structures requires a full 3D view of the crystals. Crystals as small as powder, with edges less than one micrometer, can only be analysed with electron radiation. With electron crystallography, a full 360-degree view of a single crystal is technically impossible.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 25.07.2019
UChicago jumpstarts collaborations with national labs in AI, quantum
The University of Chicago is seeding promising projects with Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the emerging fields of artificial intelligence and quantum science. The projects will tackle big questions in neuroscience, climate science, cosmological physics and quantum networking.

Physics - Materials Science - 24.07.2019
Developing technologies that run on light
Researchers are designing a nanoscale photon diode - a necessary component that could bring us closer to faster, more energy-efficient computers and communications that replace electricity with light. The future of faster, more efficient information processing may come down to light rather than electricity.

Physics - 23.07.2019
When the pigeon and the letter do not travel together
When the pigeon and the letter do not travel together
In standard communication the pigeon always carries the message; the information is linked to a physical entity/particle. Counter to intuition, in a new counterfactual communication protocol published in NPJ Quantum Information, scientists from the University of Vienna, the University of Cambridge and the MIT have experimentally demonstrated that in quantum mechanics this is not always true, thereby contradicting a crucial premise of communication theory.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.07.2019
Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks
Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks
Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many applications like carbon capture and water-cleaning. However, MOFs with large pores tend to collapse. Chemists and chemical engineers at EPFL have now solved the problem by adding small amounts of a polymer into the MOF pores, an act that impedes pore collapse.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.07.2019
Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms
Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms
Adjusting the thermal conductivity of materials is one of the challenges nanoscience is currently facing. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Spain, researchers from the University of Basel have shown that the atomic vibrations that determine heat generation in nanowires can be controlled through the arrangement of atoms alone.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.07.2019
New Laws of Attraction: Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. Their findings could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.07.2019
Single molecules can take the heat
Single molecules can take the heat
Rice postdoc led Nature study to measure thermal conductance through molecules How much heat can a molecule handle? That's been a tough question to answer until now, but Longji Cui is on the case. The Rice University researcher and his former colleagues at the University of Michigan published the first direct experimental measurements of thermal conductance through a single molecule this week in Nature.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.07.2019
50 years later, UChicago scientists continue to decode moon’s mysteries
Fifty years ago, NASA astronauts stepped off Apollo 11 and delivered what instantly became the most precious rock on Earth: nearly 50 pounds of dust and rock fragments from the surface of the moon. Suddenly, the wildest dreams of geoscientists had come true, as tiny pieces of the first rocks collected on another celestial body made their way to labs across the U.S. for analysis.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.07.2019
First-ever visualisations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
First-ever visualisations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
Scientists have visualized the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely tuned, high-performance electronic devices. Physicists from the University of Washington and the University of Warwick developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in operating microelectronic devices made of atomically thin - so-called 2D - materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.07.2019
A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune
A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune
W hat's thinner than a human hair but has a depth of special traits' A multitasking graphene device developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The superthin material easily switches from a superconductor that conducts electricity without losing any energy, to an insulator that resists the flow of electric current, and back again to a superconductor - all with a simple flip of a switch.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.07.2019
Hunting for
Hunting for "ghost particles": Neutrino observatory at the South Pole will be extended
For almost ten years, scientists from all over the world have been using the large-scale experiment "IceCube" to search for neutrinos in the permanent ice of the South Pole. Neutrinos are the smallest particles that reach Earth as cosmic rays. Now the participating researchers, among them Prof. Alexander Kappes from the University of Münster, are pleased about a huge upgrade of the laboratory, which should contribute to measuring the properties of neutrinos much more accurately than before.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.07.2019
First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
Scientists have visualized the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely tuned, high-performance electronic devices. Physicists from the University of Washington and the University of Warwick developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in operating microelectronic devices made of atomically thin - so-called 2D - materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.07.2019
Physicists find first possible 3D quantum spin liquid
Physicists find first possible 3D quantum spin liquid
Cerium pyrochlore is first to qualify as long-sought state of matter There's no known way to prove a three-dimensional "quantum spin liquid” exists, so Rice University physicists and their collaborators did the next best thing: They showed their single crystals of cerium zirconium pyrochlore had the right stuff to qualify as the first possible 3D version of the long-sought state of matter.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials
A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago. Their specialty: They move through a material in a well ordered manner that practically never lets them collide with each other and is thus very energy efficient. This implies intriguing possibilities for the electronics of the future.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Image of quantum entanglement
For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement - capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'. Two particles which interact with each other - like two photons passing through a beam splitter, for example - can sometimes remain connected, instantaneously sharing their physical states no matter how great the distance which separates them.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Which is the perfect quantum theory?
Which is the perfect quantum theory?
Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking for patterns that are characteristic of specific objects. Provided the system has learned such patterns, it is able to recognize dogs or cats on any picture.

Physics - Electroengineering - 12.07.2019
Rice device channels heat into light
Rice device channels heat into light
Carbon nanotube films created at Rice University enable method to recycle waste heat The ever-more-humble carbon nanotube may be just the device to make solar panels - and anything else that loses energy through heat - far more efficient. Rice University scientists are designing arrays of aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes to channel mid-infrared radiation (aka heat) and greatly raise the efficiency of solar energy systems.

Chemistry - Physics - 11.07.2019
What happens when you explode a chemical bond?
UC Berkeley scientists are probing the fleeting steps in rapid photochemical reactions with some of the shortest laser pulses possible today. In this case, a femtosecond pulse of visible light (green) triggers the breakup of iodine monobromide molecules (center), while attosecond XUV laser pulses (blue) take snapshots of the molecules.
« Previous 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... 22 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |