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Chemistry - Physics - 06.08.2019
Artificial tongue could have whisky counterfeiting licked
An artificial 'tongue' which can taste subtle differences between drams of whisky could help cut down on the trade in counterfeit alcohol, scientists say. In a new paper published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry's journal Nanoscale, Scottish engineers describe how they built the tiny taster, which exploits the optical properties of gold and aluminium to test the tipples.

Life Sciences - Physics - 02.08.2019
Super-resolution microscopy sheds light on dementia
Super-resolution microscopy sheds light on dementia
University of Queensland researchers have used super-resolution microscopy to observe key molecules at work inside living brain cells, further unravelling the puzzle of memory formation and the elusive causes of dementia. UQ Queensland Brain Institute 's Clem Jones Centre for Ageing and Dementia Research Professors Frédéric Meunier and Jürgen Götz found a protein, Tau, involved in Alzheimer's disease affects the organisation of the signalling protein Fyn, which plays a critical role in memory formation.

Life Sciences - Physics - 02.08.2019
Super-resolution microscopy sheds light on how brain protein Fyn becomes dysfunctional in dementia
Super-resolution microscopy sheds light on how brain protein Fyn becomes dysfunctional in dementia
University of Queensland researchers have used super-resolution microscopy to observe key molecules at work inside living brain cells, further unravelling the puzzle of memory formation and the elusive causes of dementia. UQ Queensland Brain Institute 's Clem Jones Centre for Ageing and Dementia Research Professors Frédéric Meunier and Jürgen Götz found a protein, Tau, involved in Alzheimer's disease affects the organisation of the signalling protein Fyn, which plays a critical role in memory formation.

Physics - Computer Science - 01.08.2019
Is your Supercomputer Stumped? There May Be a Quantum Solution
Is your Supercomputer Stumped? There May Be a Quantum Solution
S ome math problems are so complicated that they can bog down even the world's most powerful supercomputers. But a wild new frontier in computing that applies the rules of the quantum realm offers a different approach. A new study led by a physicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), published in the journal Scientific Reports, details how a quantum computing technique called "quantum annealing" can be used to solve problems relevant to fundamental questions in nuclear physics about the subatomic building blocks of all matter.

Physics - Materials Science - 01.08.2019
From Japanese basket weaving art to nanotechnology with ion beams
From Japanese basket weaving art to nanotechnology with ion beams
Ultradense arrays of magnetic quanta in high-temperature superconductors The properties of high-temperature superconductors can be tailored by the introduction of artificial defects. An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons.

Chemistry - Physics - 31.07.2019
New Recipes for Taking Salt Out of Seawater
New Recipes for Taking Salt Out of Seawater
Promising design rules for cost-effective desalination rely on just a few ingredients: ionic liquids plus low-cost geothermal or solar heat, or waste heat from machines A s populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water supply.

Environment - Physics - 31.07.2019
Moving Forward on Desalination
Moving Forward on Desalination
A Q&A with scientist Jeff Urban, who explains forward osmosis and how Berkeley Lab is pushing the frontiers of this emerging technology As global populations grow and water scarcity becomes an increasingly pressing issue, the number of desalination plants is growing. There are now more than 20,000 worldwide, and more than 300 million people around the world rely on desalination for some or all of their daily water needs, according to the International Desalination Association.

Physics - Computer Science - 31.07.2019
Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds
Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds
A new algorithm will allow quantum computers to investigate how the classical world we experience emerges from the quantum world The quantum-to-classical transition occurs when you add more and more particles to a quantum system, such that the weird quantum effects go away and the system starts to behave more classically.

Environment - Physics - 29.07.2019
Krypton reveals ancient water beneath the Israeli desert
The Negev desert, which covers half of Israel's land mass, is so dry that parts of it get less than three inches of water a year. But beneath it is water that sustains the people and agriculture of the region. Understanding where it came from, how much is there, and what's happening to it is critical to the security and allocation of that crucial resource.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 29.07.2019
Numerical model pinpoints source of pre-cursor to seismic signals
Numerical model pinpoints source of pre-cursor to seismic signals
Research could one day enable accurately predicting earthquakes Previous machine-learning studies found that the acoustic signals detected from an earthquake fault can be used to predict when the next earthquake will occur. Ke Gao LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 29, 2019-Numerical simulations have pinpointed the source of acoustic signals emitted by stressed faults in laboratory earthquake machines.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 29.07.2019
Researchers recreate the sun’s solar wind and plasma "burps" on Earth
The Big Red Plasma Ball is pictured in Sterling Hall. It's one of several pieces of scientific equipment being used to study the fundamental properties of plasma in order to better understand the universe, where the hot gas is abundant. Photo: Jeff Miller The sun's solar wind affects nearly everything in the solar system.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.07.2019
Oddball edge wins nanotube faceoff
Oddball edge wins nanotube faceoff
Rice theory shows peculiar 'Janus' interface a common mechanism in carbon nanotube growth When is a circle less stable than a jagged loop? Apparently when you're talking about carbon nanotubes. Rice University theoretical researchers have discovered that nanotubes with segregated sections of "zigzag” and "armchair” facets growing from a solid catalyst are far more energetically stable than a circular arrangement would be.

Physics - 26.07.2019
Drones Will Fly for Days With This New Technology
Researchers with Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley just broke another record in thermophotovoltaic efficiency, an achievement that could lead to ultralight engines that can power drones for days. For the past 15 years, the efficiency of converting heat into electricity with thermophotovoltaics - an ultralight alternative power source that could allow drones and other unmanned aerial vehicles to operate continuously for days - has been stalled at 23 percent.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.07.2019
Crystal With a Twist: Scientists Grow Spiraling New Material
With a simple twist of the fingers, one can create a beautiful spiral from a deck of cards. In the same way, scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. Their surprising structures, reported in a  new study  in the journal Nature, may yield unique optical, electronic and thermal properties, including superconductivity, the researchers say.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.07.2019
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
By stabilizing perovskites -man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity- they absorb sunlight and can be used in efficient solar panels. Perovskites are semiconductor materials that have many applications. They show particular promise in harvesting solar energy. Currently, most solar cells are made with silicon crystals, a relatively straightforward and effective material to process for this purpose.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.07.2019
Yellow is not the new black: discovery paves way for new generation of solar cells
A study led by KU Leuven for the first time explains how a promising type of perovskites - man-made crystals that can convert sunlight into electricity - can be stabilised. As a result, the crystals turn black, enabling them to absorb sunlight. This is necessary to be able to use them in new solar panels that are easy to make and highly efficient.

Physics - Life Sciences - 26.07.2019
Listening to the whispers of individual cells
Listening to the whispers of individual cells
A new method developed by biophysicists at ETH Zurich has made it possible for the first time to detect and analyse signals between individual cells. For the cells in our bodies to function as a unit, they must communicate with one another constantly. They secrete signalling molecules ' ions, proteins and nucleic acids ' that are picked up by adjacent cells, which in turn pass on the signal to other cells.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.07.2019
New quantum trick for graphene: magnetism
Physicists were stunned when two twisted sheets of graphene showed signs of superconductivity. Now Stanford scientists have shown that the wonder material also generates a type of magnetism once only dreamed of theoretically. Sometimes the best discoveries happen when scientists least expect it. While trying to replicate another team's finding, Stanford physicists recently stumbled upon a novel form of magnetism, predicted but never seen before, that is generated when two honeycomb-shaped lattices of carbon are carefully stacked and rotated to a special angle.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.07.2019
Milky Way’s central black hole puts Einstein’s theories to the test
An artistic visualization of the star S0-2 as it passes by the supermassive black hole at the galactic center, which has warped the geometry of space and time. As the star gets closer to the supermassive black hole, its light undergoes a gravitational redshift that is predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.07.2019
How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals
How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals
Researchers try a trick for complete 3D analysis of submicron crystals The 3D analysis of crystal structures requires a full 3D view of the crystals. Crystals as small as powder, with edges less than one micrometer, can only be analysed with electron radiation. With electron crystallography, a full 360-degree view of a single crystal is technically impossible.
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