News 2019

« BACK

Physics



Results 341 - 360 of 396.
« Previous 1 ... 14 15 16 17 18 19 ... 20 Next »


Physics - 07.02.2019
New Measurements of Exotic Form of Magnesium Suggest a Surprising Shape-Shift
New Measurements of Exotic Form of Magnesium Suggest a Surprising Shape-Shift
Just over a decade ago scientists pushed magnesium atoms to new limits, jamming extra neutrons into their nuclei toward - and possibly reaching - the maximum limit for this element. Now, an international team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has reproduced this exotic system, known as magnesium-40, and gleaned new and surprising clues about its nuclear structure.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 06.02.2019
Quantum leap
Cambridge researchers are devising new methods to keep sensitive information out of the hands of hackers. They launched the UK's first 'unhackable' network - made safe by the "laws of physics" - in 2018. It's really important to get this right as it's our first chance to start doing very detailed studies and see how these systems really work in the field Ian White When buying an item online, we voluntarily hand over our credit card information.

Innovation / Technology - Physics - 06.02.2019
CEA-Leti combines integrated optics and holography in novel lens-free, augmented reality technology
Leti, an institute of CEA-Tech, has developed a novel retinal-projection concept for augmented reality (AR) uses based on a combination of integrated optics and holography. The lens-free optical system uses disruptive technologies to overcome the limitations of existing AR glasses, such as limited field-of-view and bulky optical systems.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 05.02.2019
Dark Fiber Lays Groundwork for Long-Distance Earthquake Detection and Groundwater Mapping
Dark Fiber Lays Groundwork for Long-Distance Earthquake Detection and Groundwater Mapping
Berkeley Lab researchers capture a detailed picture of how earthquakes travel through the Earth's subsurface In traditional seismology, researchers studying how the earth moves in the moments before, during, and after an earthquake rely on sensors that cost tens of thousands of dollars to make and install underground.

Physics - 05.02.2019
CEA-Leti builds prototype of next-generation mid-infrared optical sensors for portable devices
SAN FRANCISCO - Feb. 5, 2019 - CEA-Leti today announced it has prototyped a next-generation optical chemical sensor using mid-infrared silicon photonics that can be integrated in smartphones and other portable devices. Coin-size, On-chip Sensors that Combine High Performance and Low Power Consumption Presented in Paper at SPIE Photonics West 2019.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.02.2019
Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions
Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions
Astronomers have found fresh evidence for significant planetary diversity within a single exoplanet system, suggesting that giant high-speed collisions are partly responsible for planetary evolution. An international team of scientists led by Italy's National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) and involving physicists from the University of Bristol spent three years observing the exoplanetary system Kepler-107 via the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in La Palma.

Physics - Chemistry - 04.02.2019
Observing hydrogen's effects in metal
Observing hydrogen’s effects in metal
Microscopy technique could help researchers design safer reactor vessels or hydrogen storage tanks. Hydrogen, the second-tiniest of all atoms, can penetrate right into the crystal structure of a solid metal. That's good news for efforts to store hydrogen fuel safely within the metal itself, but it's bad news for structures such as the pressure vessels in nuclear plants, where hydrogen uptake eventually makes the vessel's metal walls more brittle, which can lead to failure.

Physics - 01.02.2019
Virtual lens improves X-ray microscopy
Virtual lens improves X-ray microscopy
PSI researchers are first to transfer state-of-the-art microscopy method to X-ray imaging X-rays provide unique insights into the interior of materials, tissues, and cells. Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method that makes X-ray images even better: The resolution is higher and allows more precise inferences about the properties of materials.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 01.02.2019
Faster than allowed by quantum computing?
Faster than allowed by quantum computing?
Researchers determine the performance of multi-dimensional bits Quantum computers are more powerful than classical computers since they work with coherent "quantum bits" instead of ordinary zeroes and ones. But what if the laws of nature were different from what we think today - could there be even more efficient "science fiction computers"- Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna have now shown that this is not possible - as long as those machines satisfy the same construction principles as ordinary circuits and their quantum counterparts.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.02.2019
’Magnetic graphene’ switches between insulator and conductor
Researchers have found that certain ultra-thin magnetic materials can switch from insulator to conductor under high pressure, a phenomenon that could be used in the development of next-generation electronics and memory storage devices.

Physics - 01.02.2019
Unmanned vehicles to take quantum leap
Unmanned vehicles to take quantum leap
Quantum sensors being developed at the University of Queensland could revolutionise navigation and communications in unmanned and autonomous vehicles. UQ researchers are working with the Australian Defence Force (ADF), NASA , Orica Ltd and Brisbane's Skyborne Technologies to develop the next-generation sensors as part of a $6.6 million Australian initiative to develop quantum technologies for use in defence applications.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.01.2019
Knighthood for groundbreaking UofG astrophysicist
A pioneering University of Glasgow researcher who helped deliver the historic first detection of gravitational waves has received a knighthood in recognition of his contribution to physics and astronomy. James Hough, Research Professor in Natural Philosophy in the School of Physics and Astronomy, was made a Knight Bachelor of the British Empire by the Duke of Cambridgeduring a ceremony at Buckingham Palace today (Thursday 31 January).

Physics - Chemistry - 31.01.2019
Scientists ’hijack’ open-access quantum computer to tease out quantum secrets
The rules of quantum mechanics describe how atoms and molecules act very differently from the world around us. Scientists have made progress toward teasing out these rules-essential for finding ways to make new molecules and better technology-but some are so complex that they evade experimental verification.

Physics - Life Sciences - 31.01.2019
Technique could boost resolution of tissue imaging as much as tenfold
Technique could boost resolution of tissue imaging as much as tenfold
Approach developed by MIT engineers surmounts longstanding problem of light scattering within biological tissue and other complex materials. Imaging deep inside biological tissue has long been a significant challenge. That is because light tends to be scattered by complex media such as biological tissue, bouncing around inside until it comes out again at a variety of different angles.

Physics - Chemistry - 30.01.2019
Scientists tap into open-access quantum computer to tease out quantum secrets
The rules of quantum mechanics describe how atoms and molecules act very differently from the world around us. Scientists have made progress toward teasing out these rules-essential for finding ways to make new molecules and better technology-but some are so complex that they evade experimental verification.

Physics - 30.01.2019
How does a quantum particle see the world?
How does a quantum particle see the world?
Researchers at the University of Vienna study the relevance of quantum reference frames for the symmetries of the world According to one of the most fundamental principles in physics, an observer on a moving train uses the same laws to describe a ball on the platform as an observer standing on the platform - physical laws are independent on the choice of a reference frame.

Health - Physics - 30.01.2019
Ingestible, expanding pill monitors the stomach for up to a month
Ingestible, expanding pill monitors the stomach for up to a month
Soft, squishy device could potentially track ulcers, cancers, and other GI conditions over the long term. The inflatable pill is embedded with a sensor that continuously tracks the stomach's temperature for up to 30 days. If the pill needs to be removed from the stomach, a patient can drink a solution of calcium that triggers the pill to quickly shrink to its original size and pass safely out of the body.

Life Sciences - Physics - 29.01.2019
’Light tweezers’ can move, melt, and scatter mysterious biological ’icebergs’
For the first time, scientists have used light beams to manipulate lipid rafts in artificial cell membranes. Lipid rafts are domains, or areas, of protein and lipid (fats) which float freely in cell membranes - the protein and lipid layer that surrounds a cell. These structures, which float in the membranes like icebergs, play important but mysterious roles in cellular signalling that aren't yet fully explained.

Physics - 28.01.2019
Superconductors: Resistance is Futile
Superconductors: Resistance is Futile
New findings are changing the way we think about superconductivity. Experiments at TU Wien (Vienna) underline the special role of immobile charge carriers, acting as a 'glue', which makes superconductivity possible. Every standard cable, every wire, every electronic device has some electric resistance.

Physics - Health - 28.01.2019
16 Elements: Berkeley Lab's Contributions to the Periodic Table
16 Elements: Berkeley Lab’s Contributions to the Periodic Table
In celebration of the 150th anniversary of the periodic table, a look at how far it's come and where it's headed. A century ago, the periodic table looked much different than it does today. It had empty spots for elements that had not yet been found, and ended at uranium (element 92), the heaviest known element until 1940.
« Previous 1 ... 14 15 16 17 18 19 ... 20 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |