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Physics - Computer Science - 03.04.2019
Novel nanophotonic chips for encrypted data transfer: Quantum communication
Novel nanophotonic chips for encrypted data transfer: Quantum communication
A giant cylindrical refrigerator, an electron-beam pattern generator, a cleanroom, etching equipment. Sometimes it takes a lot of big things to make something very small. The nanoscientists at the University of Münster headed by Prof. Wolfram Pernice and Prof. Carsten Schuck know this only too well: they use these and other devices to produce nanophotonic chips the size of a one-cent piece.

Life Sciences - Physics - 02.04.2019
Zooming in on an Inner-Cell DNA Repair Shop
A team of scientists has constructed the first complete atomic blueprint of a complicated protein that is crucial to repairing and reading DNA This video shows an animated structural model of TFIIH, a large protein assembly that helps repair and read our genome. Berkeley Lab scientists used an advanced cryo-electron microscope to generate the first-ever atomic map of TFIIH's structure.

Physics - Health - 02.04.2019
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
With nothing more than a photonic chip and an ordinary camera, EPFL researchers have managed to count biomolecules one by one in a small sample and determine their position. Their tiny device - a marriage of optics and smart image analysis - is even able to detect a graphene sheet only a single atom thick.

Physics - Innovation - 01.04.2019
Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Colorado, Boulder have moved a step closer to developing the next generation of data storage and processing devices, using an emerging science called skyrmionics. Skyrmionics focuses on harnessing the properties of nanometer-sized structures in magnetic films called skyrmions.

Physics - Innovation - 01.04.2019
Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Colorado Boulder have moved a step closer to developing the next generation of data storage and processing devices, using an emerging science called skyrmionics. Skyrmionics focuses on harnessing the properties of nanometer-sized structures in magnetic films called skyrmions.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 01.04.2019
Where space missions are born
Where space missions are born
1 April 2019 A high-resolution radar mission to Earth's 'evil twin' Venus, a spacecraft to detect the most powerful explosions in the Universe and an observatory for the cool, dusty cosmos to investigate the origins of stars: ESA's Concurrent Design Facility has performed feasibility studies of contending candidates for the fifth medium class mission in the Agency's Cosmic Vision science programme, planned for launch in 2032.

Life Sciences - Physics - 01.04.2019
Breakthrough Study of Cell Signaling Holds Promise for Immune Research and Beyond
A team of physical chemists led by Berkeley Lab has unraveled the inner workings of a process that allows hard-working T cells to tune out fake signals The atomic structure of the SOS protein, a cell messaging molecule that uses a unique timing mechanism to regulate activation of a critical immune system pathway.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.04.2019

Physics - Chemistry - 29.03.2019
A compass pointing West
A compass pointing West
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have discovered a special phenomenon of magnetism in the nano range. It enables magnets to be assembled in unusual configurations. This could be used to build computer memories and switches to increase the performance of microprocessors. The results of the work have now been published in the journal Science .

Physics - 29.03.2019
Quantum Optical Cooling of Nanoparticles
Quantum Optical Cooling of Nanoparticles
When a particle is completely isolated from its environment, the laws of quantum physics start to play a crucial role. One important requirement to see quantum effects is to remove all thermal energy from the particle motion, i.e. to cool it as close as possible to absolute zero temperature.

Life Sciences - Physics - 28.03.2019
Introducing a kinder, gentler way to blow holes in cells
Introducing a kinder, gentler way to blow holes in cells
When scientists attempt to slip big molecules, like the Cas9 enzyme that is key to CRISPR gene editing, into cells, things can get messy. One popular technique, bulk electroporation, involves jolting cells with electricity. This blows holes everywhere in the cell, allowing anything and everything to get inside.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.03.2019
How to use gravitational waves to measure the expansion of the universe
On the morning of Aug. 17, 2017, after traveling for more than a hundred million years, the aftershocks from a massive collision in a galaxy far, far away finally reached Earth. These ripples in the fabric of spacetime, called gravitational waves, tripped alarms at two ultra-sensitive detectors called LIGO, sending texts flying and scientists scrambling.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.03.2019
Toxic and aggressive, but widely used
Toxic and aggressive, but widely used
In toothpaste, Teflon, LEDs and medications, it shows its sunny side - but elemental fluorine is extremely aggressive and highly toxic. Attempts to determine the crystal structure of solid fluorine using X-rays ended with explosions 50 years ago. A research team has now clarified the actual structure of the fluorine using neutrons from the Heinz Maier Leibnitz Research Neutron Source (FRM II).

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 27.03.2019
GRAVITY instrument breaks new ground in exoplanet imaging
GRAVITY instrument breaks new ground in exoplanet imaging
Eso1905 — Science Release Cutting-edge VLTI instrument reveals details of a storm-wracked exoplanet using optical interferometry 27 March 2019 The GRAVITY instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) has made the first direct observation of an exoplanet using optical interferometry.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.03.2019
Detectors set to resume hunt for gravitational waves
University of Glasgow astrophysicists are gearing up to resume the search for gravitational waves, the ripples in spacetime caused by some of the universe's most spectacular events. The Glasgow researchers played key roles in the development of the National Science Foundation's Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) project, based in the United States, which will be starting a new science run on Monday April 1 along with the Virgo gravitational detector, based in Italy.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.03.2019
A new spin on nanophysics: Part 2 of the series
A new spin on nanophysics: Part 2 of the series "Under lock and key at Münster University"
Part 2 of the series "Under lock and key at Münster University": the vacuum machine at the Institute of Physics is used to investigate spin phenomena The yellow stickers can already be seen from a distance: "Laser beam", "High voltage - danger to life", "No unauthorized access". The locked door with the warning notices is located at the end of a long, dark corridor on the fourth floor of the Institute of Physics at the University of Münster.

Physics - 25.03.2019
In a new quantum simulator, light behaves like a magnet
In a new quantum simulator, light behaves like a magnet
Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. Studying it, the researchers have found that photons can behave like magnetic dipoles at temperatures close to absolute zero, following the laws of quantum mechanics.

Computer Science - Physics - 22.03.2019
Machine learning could help scientists invent flexible electronics
Organic electronics could allow companies to print electronics like paper or incorporate them into clothing to power wearable electronics-if there were only better ways to control their electronic structure. To help address this challenge, Nick Jackson, a postdoctoral fellow in the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering , developed a faster way of creating molecular models by using machine learning.

Physics - 21.03.2019
LHCb sees a new flavour of matter-antimatter asymmetry
LHCb sees a new flavour of matter-antimatter asymmetry
The LHCb collaboration at CERN 1 has seen, for the first time, the matter-antimatter asymmetry known as CP violation in a particle dubbed the D0 meson. The finding, presented today at the annual Rencontres de Moriond conference and in a dedicated CERN seminar , is sure to make it into the textbooks of particle physics.

Life Sciences - Physics - 21.03.2019
Engineering Technique Provides Insight into Cellular Forces
Kris Dahl, a chemical engineering and biomedical engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University, is using a new method to understand how cells are structured. Her method uses densely packed regions of condensed DNA, known as chromatin, to be used a sensors for cellular force generation. The technique, known as SINK, which stands for sensors from intranuclear kinetics, allowed Dahl and her team to provide physical and biological insights into cells.

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