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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.01.2019
When Black Holes Collide
When Black Holes Collide
One of the most cataclysmic events to occur in the cosmos involves the collision of two black holes. Formed from the deathly collapse of massive stars, black holes are incredibly compact-a person standing near a stellar-mass black hole would feel gravity about a trillion times more strongly than they would on Earth.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.01.2019
Fine tuning for clean energy
An international collaboration between researchers in Spain and Scotland has resulted in a new approach to improve the catalysts needed to carry out the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). The reaction, in which water is transformed into hydrogen and oxygen, is a promising alternative to humanity's dependency on fossil fuels to satisfy energy requirements.

Computer Science / Telecom - Physics - 23.01.2019
CMU’s DeltaFS Team Aims To Create Smarter Ways To Organize, Store Supercomputer Data
Trinity occupies a footprint the size of an entire floor of most office buildings, but its silently toiling workers are not flesh and blood. Trinity is a supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, made up of row upon row of CPUs stacked from the white-tiled floor to the fluorescent ceiling.

Physics - 22.01.2019
3D printing and metals science combine for stronger, crystal-inspired materials
Imperial materials scientists have created new artificial materials which combine our knowledge of metals with 3D printing. The findings could speed up the use of 3D printed materials in everything from construction and vehicles to medical devices. 3D printing is often used to produce engineering components.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.01.2019
Seeing double could help resolve dispute about how fast the universe is expanding
Seeing double could help resolve dispute about how fast the universe is expanding
Science + Technology Team led by two UCLA astronomers uses split images of quasars to produce a new estimate of the Hubble constant Christopher Crockett The question of how quickly the universe is expanding has been bugging astronomers for almost a century. Different studies keep coming up with different answers — which has some researchers wondering if they've overlooked a key mechanism in the machinery that drives the cosmos.

Chemistry - Physics - 22.01.2019
Creating attraction between molecules deep in the periodic table
Imagine a waterproof computer. It's not going to happen tomorrow, but it may no longer be a pipedream since a McGill-led international research team has shown for the first time that it is possible to form strong, stable attractions between some of the heavier elements in the periodic table. A recent article provides the first experimental and theoretical proof that heavy, large atoms of an increasingly metallic nature - such as arsenic or even antimony - can be used to create new materials called cocrystals by using halogen bonds.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.01.2019
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a £1.6M project
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a £1.6M project
Dr Clotilde Cucinotta is trying to solve the combined electrical and chemical problem, paving the way for next-generation energy sources. Dr Cucinotta joined Imperial this year, bringing an EPSRC grant of more than £1.6 million and a wide range of experience. We talked to her about her research, her journey so far, and why the Molecular Sciences Research Hub - the new home for Chemistry at Imperial's White City campus - is the best place to carry out her plans.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.01.2019
Hand-knitted Molecules
Hand-knitted Molecules
Molecules are usually formed in reaction vessels or laboratory flasks. An Empa research team has now succeeded in producing molecules between two microscopically small, movable gold tips - in a sense as a "hand-knitted" unique specimen. The properties of the molecules can be monitored in real time while they are being produced.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.01.2019
Saturn hasn't always had rings
Saturn hasn’t always had rings
One of the last acts of NASA's Cassini spacecraft before its death plunge into Saturn's hydrogen and helium atmosphere was to coast between the planet and its rings and let them tug it around, essentially acting as a gravity probe. Precise measurements of Cassini's final trajectory have now allowed scientists to make the first accurate estimate of the amount of material in the planet's rings, weighing them based on the strength of their gravitational pull.

Life Sciences - Physics - 17.01.2019
Thanks to rapid, 3D imaging, anyone can tour the fly brain
Thanks to rapid, 3D imaging, anyone can tour the fly brain
A new fly-through of the fly brain allows anyone to whizz past neurons and visit any of the 40 million synapses where neurons touch neuron. It's a super-resolution view of the complex network connections in the insect's brain that underlie behaviors ranging from feeding to mating. What's unprecedented, however, is that this 3D map over the whole fly brain, which shows details as small as 60 nanometers across, was captured in less than three days.

Life Sciences - Physics - 17.01.2019
Mapping the brain at high resolution
New 3-D imaging technique can reveal, much more quickly than other methods, how neurons connect throughout the brain. Researchers have developed a new way to image the brain with unprecedented resolution and speed. Using this approach, they can locate individual neurons, trace connections between them, and visualize organelles inside neurons, over large volumes of brain tissue.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.01.2019
Scientists Team Up With Industry to Mass-Produce Detectors for Next-Gen Cosmic Experiment
Scientists Team Up With Industry to Mass-Produce Detectors for Next-Gen Cosmic Experiment
Berkeley Lab researcher leads effort to take specialized superconducting sensor-making processes into commercial production Chasing clues about the infant universe in relic light known as the cosmic microwave background, or CMB, scientists are devising more elaborate and ultrasensitive detector arrays to measure the properties of this light with increasing precision.

Physics - Innovation - 15.01.2019
International collaboration publishes concept design for a post-LHC future circular collider at CERN
International collaboration publishes concept design for a post-LHC future circular collider at CERN
Geneva. Today, the Future Circular Collider (FCC) collaboration submitted its Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for publication, a four-volume document that presents the different options for a large circular collider of the future. It showcases the great physics opportunities offered by machines of unprecedented energy and intensity and describes the technical challenges, cost and schedule for realisation.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.01.2019
Measurement of five flashes from the depths of the universe
Measurement of five flashes from the depths of the universe
First-time precise measurement of gamma-ray bursts conducted successfully from a space station A detector called POLAR, developed at PSI, has been sent to outer space to collect data. In September 2016, the device was launched into Earth orbit on board the newest Chinese space station. From that vantage point, POLAR recorded so-called gamma-ray bursts flashing in the far reaches of the universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova
ESA's high-energy space telescopes Integral and XMM-Newton have helped to find a source of powerful X-rays at the centre of an unprecedentedly bright and rapidly evolving stellar explosion that suddenly appeared in the sky earlier this year. The ATLAS telescope in Hawaii first spotted the phenomenon, since then named AT2018cow, on 16 June.

Physics - 10.01.2019
More stable light comes from intentionally squashed quantum dots
More stable light comes from intentionally squashed quantum dots
Exploiting new 'strain engineering' approach produces highly stable, narrow linewidth light from individual quantum dots Novel colloidal quantum dots are formed of an emitting cadmium/selenium (Cd/Se) core enclosed into a compositionally graded CdxZn1-xSe shell wherein the fraction of zinc versus cadmium increases towards the dot's periphery.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.01.2019
Signatures of a 'messy' star that made its companion go supernova
Signatures of a ’messy’ star that made its companion go supernova
Many stars explode as luminous supernovae when, swollen with age, they run out of fuel for nuclear fusion. But some stars can go supernova simply because they have a close and pesky companion star that, one day, perturbs its partner so much that it explodes. These latter events can happen in binary star systems, where two stars attempt to share dominion.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise
Data captured by ESA's galaxy-mapping spacecraft Gaia has revealed for the first time how white dwarfs, the dead remnants of stars like our Sun, turn into solid spheres as the hot gas inside them cools down. This process of solidification, or crystallisation, of the material inside white dwarfs was predicted 50 years ago but it wasn't until the arrival of Gaia that astronomers were able to observe enough of these objects with such a precision to see the pattern revealing this process.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.01.2019
Shows single atoms can make more efficient catalysts
Detailed observations of iridium atoms at work could help make catalysts that drive chemical reactions smaller, cheaper and more efficient. Catalysts are chemical matchmakers: They bring other chemicals close together, increasing the chance that they'll react with each other and produce something people want, like fuel or fertilizer.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2019
After mapping millions of galaxies, Dark Energy Survey finishes data collection
For the past six years, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has been part of an international effort to create an unprecedented survey of distant galaxies and better understand the nature of dark energy-the mysterious force accelerating the expansion of the universe. After scanning about a quarter of the southern skies over 800 nights, the Dark Energy Survey finished taking data on Jan.
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