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Physics - Materials Science - 07.10.2019
Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat
Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers discover a new approach for capturing energy from light-generated, 'hot' electrons, avoiding wasteful heat loss This discovery can potentially enable novel, highly-efficient solar cells, light detectors, photocathodes and light-driven chemical reactions. Victor Klimov LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct.

Physics - Materials Science - 07.10.2019
'Picoscience' and a plethora of new materials
’Picoscience’ and a plethora of new materials
The revolutionary tech discoveries of the next few decades, the ones that will change daily life, may come from new materials so small they make nanomaterials look like lumpy behemoths. These new materials will be designed and refined at the picometer scale, which is a thousand times smaller than a nanometer and a million times smaller than a micrometer (which itself is smaller than the width of a human hair).

Physics - 04.10.2019
X-rays reveal the inner workings of quantum sound-wave technology
When exposed to stress and strain, materials can display a wide range of different properties. By using sound waves, scientists have begun to explore fundamental stress behaviors in a crystalline material that could form the basis for quantum information technologies-a type of technology which could have fundamentally breakthrough applications in multiple parts of our lives.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.10.2019
New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions
New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions
A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published Oct. 4 Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern. The team's design principles and experimental findings demonstrate that it is possible to model and construct metamaterial devices that can precisely manipulate optical fields with high spatial resolution in three dimensions.

Chemistry - Physics - 04.10.2019
The fast dance of electron spins
The fast dance of electron spins
Chemists investigate the interactions of metal complexes and light Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.10.2019
New 'fuzzy' dark matter research disrupts conventional thinking
New ’fuzzy’ dark matter research disrupts conventional thinking
New research conducted at the University of Sussex has simulated dark matter in a new way for the first time, disrupting conventional thinking about the make-up of the universe. The research, published in Physical Review Letters , was done alongside Princeton, Harvard, Cambridge and MIT universities and others.

Health - Physics - 03.10.2019
Infrared vision for immunotherapy
A new technique employs a bright infrared light that can pass through millimeters of tissue to illuminate tumors deep inside the body. Stanford chemists have developed a new deep-tissue imaging technique that can see beneath the skin of living subjects to illuminate buried tumors with unparalleled clarity.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 02.10.2019
Quantum Vacuum: Less than Zero Energy
Quantum Vacuum: Less than Zero Energy
Is it possible to borrow energy from an empty space? And if yes, do we have to give it back? Energy values smaller than zero are allowed - at least within certain limits. Energy is a quantity that must always be positive - at least that's what our intuition tells us. If every single particle is removed from a certain volume until there is nothing left that could possibly carry energy, then a limit has been reached.

Computer Science / Telecom - Physics - 01.10.2019
How AI could change science
When most people encounter artificial intelligence today, it's recommending a new song or movie. But that's only the start to what's possible. AI technology is increasingly used to open up new horizons for scientists and researchers. At the University of Chicago, researchers are using it for everything from scanning the skies for supernovae to finding new drugs from millions of potential combinations and developing a deeper understanding of the complex phenomena underlying the Earth's climate.

Physics - 01.10.2019
A metronome for quantum particles
A metronome for quantum particles
A new measurement protocol, developed at TU Wien (Vienna), makes it possible to measure the quantum phase of electrons - an important step for attosecond physics. It is like a microscope for time: Today's methods of attosecond physic allows us to measure extremely short time intervals. With the help of short laser pulses, physical processes can be investigated on a time scale of attoseconds - that is billionths of a billionth of a second.

Physics - Materials Science - 30.09.2019
Quantum material goes where none have gone before ?
Quantum material goes where none have gone before ?
Alloy behaves strangely while traversing potential 'spin liquid' state Rice University physicist Qimiao Si began mapping quantum criticality more than a decade ago, and he's finally found a traveler that can traverse the final frontier. The traveler is an alloy of cerium palladium and aluminum, and its journey is described in a study published online this week by Si, a theoretical physicist and director of the Rice Center for Quantum Materials (RCQM), and colleagues in China, Germany and Japan.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 30.09.2019
Growing old together: a sharper look at black holes and their host galaxies
Some relationships are written in the stars. That's definitely the case for supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, according to a new study from Yale University. The "special relationship" between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their hosts - something astronomers and physicists have observed for quite a while - can now be understood as a bond that begins early in a galaxy's formation and has a say in how both the galaxy and the SMBH at its center grow over time, the researchers note.

Physics - 30.09.2019
Quantum Mechanics survives a gravity test
Quantum Mechanics survives a gravity test
Scientists have challenged one of the great mysteries of physics - by undertaking an experiment in space proposed by The University of Queensland a decade ago. The School of Mathematics and Physics' Professor Timothy Ralph collaborated on the study, which he said could help bring quantum technologies, such as a global quantum internet, closer to being part of everyday life.

Physics - 30.09.2019
How to dismantle a nuclear bomb
How to dismantle a nuclear bomb
MIT team successfully tests a new method for verification of weapons reduction. UPI reporter Brooks Hays writes that MIT researchers has developed a new test to verify the destruction of nuclear weapons. "The test can identify the specific isotope of the target element, which could allow inspectors to confirm the identity of a warhead before it's disassembled," writes Hays.

Life Sciences - Physics - 28.09.2019
Particle physicists lend a hand to advance neuroscience
Particle physicists lend a hand to advance neuroscience
After meeting at a party, a Stanford psychologist and SLAC particle physicists have collaborated on a new kind of EEG device that can stimulate the brain and read out the effects. Psychologist Anthony Norcia had a problem. In his research untangling vision processing in the brain, he wanted to simultaneously zap the brain with electricity and measure the electrical aftereffects - two techniques commonly used to probe brain function, but never successfully combined.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 27.09.2019
More accurate than expected
More accurate than expected
Despite their extremely small mass, neutrinos play a key role in cosmology and particle physics. After evaluation of the first measurement results in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN), it is now clear: The previously unknown mass of the neutrinos must be less than 1 electron volt. This result is more accurate than previous measurements and raises hopes of discovering new neutrino properties.

Physics - Electroengineering - 27.09.2019
An Elegant Solution to the Soft Sensing Challenge
From warehouses to hospitals, soft robots are used in different places to assist humans in moving items, treating patients and gathering information. As interests in these robots keep growing, Carnegie Mellon University scientists are developing ways to give them the kind of sensing capabilities found in natural soft tissue.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.09.2019
A planet that should not exist
A planet that should not exist
Astronomers detected a giant planet orbiting a small star. The planet has much more mass than theoretical models predict. While this surprising discovery was made by a Spanish-German team at an observatory in southern Spain, researchers at the University of Bern studied how the mysterious exoplanet might have formed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.09.2019
Galaxy found to float in a tranquil sea of halo gas
Galaxy found to float in a tranquil sea of halo gas
Using one cosmic mystery to probe another, an international team of astronomers has analyzed the signal from a fast radio burst - an enigmatic blast of cosmic radio waves lasting less than a millisecond - to characterize the diffuse gas in the halo of a massive galaxy. Their findings , published online  Sept.

Physics - 26.09.2019
Detailed PICture reveals how tooth enamel is strong enough to last a lifetime
Break any bone in the human body, and the body can repair the tissue and fix the damage. Yet tooth enamel - the strongest tissue in the human body - cannot repair itself. Still, our teeth last a lifetime. "We apply huge pressure on tooth enamel every time we chew, hundreds of times a day," says Pupa Gilbert , professor of physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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