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Physics - Electroengineering - 24.10.2019
The quantum internet is within reach
The quantum internet is within reach
An international team headed by physicists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has, for the first time ever, experimentally implemented secure quantum communication in the microwave band in a local quantum network. The new architecture represents a crucial step on the road to distributed quantum computing.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 23.10.2019
Theorists discover the ’Rosetta Stone’ for neutrino physics
UChicago, Brookhaven, Fermilab scientists find new math identity while studying particle physics Usually the way things work is that mathematicians make math discoveries, and physicists borrow and adapt those ideas to explain the universe. But three physicists at the University of Chicago and two national laboratories have discovered a fundamental identity in linear algebra-based on studying particle physics.

Chemistry - Physics - 22.10.2019
Münster University chemists create new types of Lewis acids
Münster University chemists create new types of Lewis acids
Researchers at the University of Münster have developed a method which makes it possible to create three-coordinate Lewis superacids on the basis of phosphorus. Previously, it had not been possible to isolate this type of compound, either in a liquid or in a solid state, due to its extreme electrophilicity and the associated reactivity.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.10.2019
It takes two - a two-atom catalyst, that is - to make oxygen from water
The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth - reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust. Researchers say rust has long been seen as a potentially attractive material for solar water splitting, a key process that plants employ in photosynthesis.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.10.2019
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team led by Jani Kotakoski at the University of Vienna and Jannik Meyer at the University of Tübingen has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene. Direct images of the actual atoms and the analysis of Life as we know it is based on just a handful of different types of atoms (called elements), among them carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.10.2019
Atomic force microscopy: new sensing element for high-speed imaging
Atomic force microscopy: new sensing element for high-speed imaging
Researchers at TU Wien have developed a new type of sensing element for atomic force microscopy, which enables a high measurement speed and can even image sensitive processes in living cells. High-definition images of minute objects are standard these days including the imaging of bacteria and viruses, and even molecules and individual atoms in extremely fine details.

Materials Science - Physics - 15.10.2019
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behaviour and identify the important new ones. Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , challenge the accepted wisdom on wetting and drying phase behaviour.

Physics - 15.10.2019
Quantum physics: ménage ŕ trois photon-style
Quantum physics: ménage ŕ trois photon-style
Physicists from UNIGE have discovered a new quantum property: by placing three pairs of photons in a network, it is possible to entangle them and create new ultra-strong correlations. Entanglement is one of the properties specific to quantum particles. When two photons become entangled, for instance, the quantum state of the first will correlate perfectly with the quantum state of the second, even if they are at a distance from one another.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.10.2019
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
A very special kind of light is emitted by tungsten diselenide layers. The reason for this has been unclear. Now an explanation has been found at TU Wien (Vienna). It is an exotic phenomenon that nobody was able to explain for years: when energy is supplied to a thin layer of the material tungsten diselenide, it begins to glow in a highly unusual fashion.

Physics - Music - 14.10.2019
Super light dampers for low tones
Super light dampers for low tones
A team of Empa acoustic researchers has built macroscopic crystal structures that use internal rotation to attenuate the propagation of waves. The method makes it possible to build very light and stiff materials that can also "swallow" low frequencies very well, as they report Communicatons. The world of crystals offers many interesting properties: crystals can strike electric sparks in disposable lighters, for example, they can produce polarized light and they can scatter bundled X-rays into thousands of individual reflexes that are refracted in all spatial directions.

Materials Science - Physics - 11.10.2019
White blood cell 'security guard' and community messages: News from the College
White blood cell ’security guard’ and community messages: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From a white blood cell playing a ‘security guard' role, to the President's call for collaboration and community, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Patrolling eye Researchers from Imperial have discovered a new ‘security guard' role for a type of white blood cell called a neutrophil.

Physics - Innovation - 11.10.2019
Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity. Their discovery, which holds great promise for quantum technologies of the future, has just been published in Science. Superconductivity has fascinated scientists for many years since it offers the potential to revolutionize current technologies.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.10.2019
Simple Materials Offer a Peek into the Quantum Realm
Simple Materials Offer a Peek into the Quantum Realm
As reported , a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists were the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moiré superlattices. The new findings will help researchers understand how to better manipulate materials into light emitters with controllable quantum properties.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.10.2019
Scientists Observe Year-long Plateaus in Decline of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves
A team of scientists, including a researcher from the University of Birmingham, has discovered that the fading of infrared light following Type Ia supernovae explosions can be interrupted, with brightness staying the same for up to a year. This is a surprising finding as astronomers had expected that the light curve would not only continue decreasing but even experience a sharp drop, rather than flattening into a plateau.

Physics - Innovation - 09.10.2019
Physicists couple key components of quantum technologies
Physicists couple key components of quantum technologies
Quantum effects are genuinely found in the world of nanostructures and allow a wide variety of new technological applications. For example, a quantum computer could in the future solve problems, which conventional computers need a lot of time to handle. All over the world, researchers are engaged in intensive work on the individual components of quantum technologies - these include circuits that process information using single photons instead of electricity, as well as light sources producing such individual quanta of light.

Physics - Innovation - 09.10.2019
Quantum paradox experiment may lead to more accurate clocks and sensors
Quantum paradox experiment may lead to more accurate clocks and sensors
More accurate clocks and sensors may result from a recently proposed experiment, linking an Einstein-devised paradox to quantum mechanics. University of Queensland physicist Dr Magdalena Zych said the international collaboration aimed to test Einstein's twin paradox using quantum particles in a ‘superposition' state.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.10.2019
A promising route to scalable quantum photonics
A promising route to scalable quantum photonics
Researchers from the Photonics Research Group (imec, Ghent University) and MIT have integrated single photon emitters in 2D layered materials with a Silicon Nitride photonic chip. Even for moderate quantum yields, dielectric cavities could be designed such that the single photon extraction into the guided mode can reach unity.

Physics - Computer Science - 08.10.2019
Smaller than a coin
Smaller than a coin
ETH researchers have developed a compact infrared spectrometer. It's small enough to fit on a computer chip but can still open up interesting possibilities - in space and in everyday life. Nowadays, a mobile phone can do almost anything: take photos or video, send messages, determine its present location, and of course transmit telephone conversations.

Materials Science - Physics - 07.10.2019
Unbreakable
Unbreakable
Can glass flow at room temperature and thus withstand hard impacts' A theory from the 1970s predicted exactly this. Empa researchers have now provided the proof. The results could form the basis for robust 3D printed glass microarchitectures. No one in the world has ever seen what we have measured," says Rajaprakash Ramachandramoorthy.

Physics - Materials Science - 07.10.2019
Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat
Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers discover a new approach for capturing energy from light-generated, 'hot' electrons, avoiding wasteful heat loss This discovery can potentially enable novel, highly-efficient solar cells, light detectors, photocathodes and light-driven chemical reactions. Victor Klimov LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct.

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