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Politics - Psychology - 16.04.2019
Political fake news: they might be a liar but they’re my liar
An international collaboration has investigated how people perceive politicians when they spread misinformation. The research found supporters of the politicians reduced their belief in misinformation once corrected, yet their feelings towards the political figure remained unchanged if misinformation was presented alongside an equal number of facts.

Politics - 13.03.2019
Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena
Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena
EPFL scientists have developed a new image-processing method that can capture extremely rapid phenomena using any type of camera. Their method, called Virtual Frame Technique, delivers better performance than any commercial high-speed camera and is affordable and accessible to anyone. Many phenomena occurring in nature and industry happen very quickly: a tear running through a piece of fabric, a rubber ball bouncing off a hard floor, a drop of water wetting a dry surface and a piece of scotch tape peeling off, for example.

Politics - 04.03.2019
Politically polarized teams produce better work, analysis of Wikipedia finds
Many studies have found that political polarization in the United States is rapidly increasing, particularly online, where echo chambers and social media have inflamed partisanship. But new research from the University of Chicago's Knowledge Lab of more than 200,000 Wikipedia pages finds that collaborations bridging the political spectrum produce higher-quality work than articles edited by moderate or one-sided teams.

Innovation / Technology - Politics - 20.02.2019
Top Smart Cities are Global Cities
An unprecedented global study has analysed and ranked leading cities in the worldwide “smart city” phenomenon. Based on a comprehensive webometric study, in total 27 cities made it onto the list of the world's leading smart cities, led by London, Singapore and Barcelona. The group of 27 were whittled down from a full list of over 5550 worldwide cities with 100,000 inhabitants or more.

Politics - Business / Economics - 30.01.2019
Tuning out: What happens when you drop Facebook?
The early promise and excitement of social media ' its ability to connect people around the world and inspire grass-roots activism ' has given way to fears that it is making us depressed and more politically polarized than ever. But is that really happening? In one of the largest-ever randomized evaluations of Facebook's broader social impacts, Stanford economists look at common assumptions about the platform and its effects on individuals and society.