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Environment - Politics - 04.07.2019
Trade agreements only partly shift environmental burden onto poorer countries
Trade agreements only partly shift environmental burden onto poorer countries
Is trade liberalisation shifting environmental burden from industrialised countries to poorer ones' This question was investigated by a research team at ETH Zurich led by Thomas Bernauer. In particular, they analysed whether, and if so how, commerce driven by free trade agreements is transferring environmental impacts from industrialised countries to poorer ones.

Social Sciences - Politics - 27.06.2019
UK-first as 960,000 project explores integration in Bristol
A unique new project led by the University of Bristol has received a 960,000 boost to improve integration across Bristol by exploring how its citizens and communities share spaces and move around the city. University researchers on the 'Everyday Integration' project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), will work with Bristol City Council and 29 community partners to identify existing best-practice and better understand how to overcome the various barriers people currently face.

Environment - Politics - 12.06.2019
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
A new study finds that climate has affected the risk of armed conflict. Though other drivers of violence were found to be substantially more influential, as global temperatures continue to rise, the changing climate is expected to further amplify the risk of conflict. Can a changing climate trigger organised armed conflict, such as civil war, or make it more severe?

Politics - Environment - 12.06.2019
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
As global temperatures climb, the risk of armed conflict is expected to increase substantially, according to experts across several fields. Intensifying climate change will increase the future risk of violent armed conflict within countries, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.

Social Sciences - Politics - 29.05.2019
Tackling hate speech on social media in the Asia-Pacific
Facebook has joined forces with Australian university experts to devise policy that better manages online harmful content and hate speech in the Asia-Pacific region. Professor Katharine Gelber , Head of School for The University of Queensland's Political Science and International Studies , will join colleague Dr Kirril Shields and University of Sydney researchers Dr Aim Sinpeng and Dr Fiona Martin on the 12 month project.

Health - Politics - 29.05.2019
Long-term health effects of armed conflict could last years after fighting stops
Living in a warzone is linked with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke among civilians, even years after the conflict ends. The findings come from the first systematic review of the effects of armed conflict on heart disease risk, carried out by researchers at Imperial College London and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Politics - 07.05.2019
Scale of Russian interference in European democracy revealed
Evidence of the Kremlin-backed Internet Research Agency's long-term interest in European politics and elections has been revealed in two new studies from Cardiff University's Crime and Security Research Institute. Taken together the findings provide a strong indication of the kinds of disinformation campaigns that could be directed towards the 2019 European Parliamentary elections on 23 May.

Politics - Social Sciences - 02.05.2019
Immigrants: citizens' acceptance depends on questions asked
Immigrants: citizens’ acceptance depends on questions asked
The number of immigrants the Swiss are willing to take in on an annual basis depends greatly on the quantified proposal (i.e. high or low) put forward to them - as recently revealed by a team of UNIGE researchers.

Politics - Psychology - 16.04.2019
Political fake news: they might be a liar but they’re my liar
An international collaboration has investigated how people perceive politicians when they spread misinformation. The research found supporters of the politicians reduced their belief in misinformation once corrected, yet their feelings towards the political figure remained unchanged if misinformation was presented alongside an equal number of facts.

Politics - 13.03.2019
Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena
Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena
EPFL scientists have developed a new image-processing method that can capture extremely rapid phenomena using any type of camera. Their method, called Virtual Frame Technique, delivers better performance than any commercial high-speed camera and is affordable and accessible to anyone. Many phenomena occurring in nature and industry happen very quickly: a tear running through a piece of fabric, a rubber ball bouncing off a hard floor, a drop of water wetting a dry surface and a piece of scotch tape peeling off, for example.

Politics - 04.03.2019
Politically polarized teams produce better work, analysis of Wikipedia finds
Many studies have found that political polarization in the United States is rapidly increasing, particularly online, where echo chambers and social media have inflamed partisanship. But new research from the University of Chicago's Knowledge Lab of more than 200,000 Wikipedia pages finds that collaborations bridging the political spectrum produce higher-quality work than articles edited by moderate or one-sided teams.

Innovation / Technology - Politics - 20.02.2019
Top Smart Cities are Global Cities
An unprecedented global study has analysed and ranked leading cities in the worldwide “smart city” phenomenon. Based on a comprehensive webometric study, in total 27 cities made it onto the list of the world's leading smart cities, led by London, Singapore and Barcelona. The group of 27 were whittled down from a full list of over 5550 worldwide cities with 100,000 inhabitants or more.

Politics - Business / Economics - 30.01.2019
Tuning out: What happens when you drop Facebook?
The early promise and excitement of social media ' its ability to connect people around the world and inspire grass-roots activism ' has given way to fears that it is making us depressed and more politically polarized than ever. But is that really happening? In one of the largest-ever randomized evaluations of Facebook's broader social impacts, Stanford economists look at common assumptions about the platform and its effects on individuals and society.

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