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Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 05.12.2019
Social influencers: what can we learn from animals?
Research from Oxford University calls us to reconsider how behaviours may spread through societies of wild animals, and how this might provide new insights into human social networks. Our social connections to one another, whether it be online or in real life, give rise to our 'social networks'. Previously, it has often been assumed that the individuals with the most social connections are the primary 'social influencers' and most likely to acquire, and spread, new behaviours.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Young women face unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis - study
Thousands of young women are unnecessarily admitted to UK hospitals and undergo surgery they do not need each year in the NHS, according to a new study. Surgery for appendicitis is one of the world's most common emergency operations. UK hospitals exhibit the world's highest rate of ‘normal appendicectomy,' where patients undergo surgery for suspected appendicitis but laboratory examination of the removed appendix finds it to be normal.

Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Sleep helps memory, right? Not for eyewitnesses
New research investigating the effect of sleep on eyewitness memory has found that having a period of sleep, compared to a period of wake, does not improve eyewitness identification accuracy. The research team, led by PhD student, David Morgan at Royal Holloway, University of London, Professor Laura Mickes, senior author at the University of Bristol and including researchers from Royal Holloway, the Universities of California, USA and Birmingham, and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is published today [4 December] in Royal Society Open Science .

Health - Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Rural residents at greater risk of maternal morbidity and mortality compared to urban residents
Childbirth is increasingly risky in the United States. Maternal deaths and potentially life-threatening complications - called severe maternal morbidity - are climbing. This reality is especially challenging for rural communities, which face declining access to obstetric services. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are approximately 700 maternal deaths and an additional 50,000 cases of severe maternal morbidity in the U.S. every year.

Environment - Social Sciences - 02.12.2019
Improved health check for running waters
If one turns a stone over in a river or stream, it swarms with tiny animals: caddisflies, water beetles, freshwater shrimp, and snails. The invertebrates living on the beds of water bodies that can be seen with the naked eye, called macroinvertebrates, are rather unimposing, but for science and the protection of surface waters they are of great importance.

Social Sciences - 02.12.2019
Annual Title IX/Sexual Harassment Report released
Today Stanford University released its third annual Title IX/Sexual Harassment Report , which outlines the ways in which the university responded to reported concerns of sexual harassment, sexual violence and gender discrimination on campus and in all programs and activities connected to Stanford. The report includes information about reports of prohibited sexual conduct involving students, faculty and staff during the period from Sept.

Innovation - Social Sciences - 28.11.2019
Birmingham ’innovation hub’ boosts global clean energy prospects
British and German experts from industry and academia will create a new ‘Innovation Hub' based in Birmingham to deliver new approaches to energy and waste management that will benefit cities and communities in China and around the world. Energy experts from the University of Birmingham and Fraunhofer UMSICHT have renewed their Joint Research Platform set up in 2016 with plans to locate collaborative research in a new centre at the city's Tyseley Energy Park.

Social Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 27.11.2019
Researchers get 'glimpse into a human mind' as it makes choices in groups, social media
Researchers get ’glimpse into a human mind’ as it makes choices in groups, social media
The choices we make in large group settings - such as in online forums and social media - might seem fairly automatic to us. But our decision-making process is more complicated than we know. So, researchers have been working to understand what's behind that seemingly intuitive process. Now, new University of Washington research has discovered that in large groups of essentially anonymous members, people make choices based on a model of the "mind of the group" and an evolving simulation of how a choice will affect that theorized mind.

Social Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
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Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Children of abused mothers 50 per cent more likely to have low IQ
In the study academics from the universities of Manchester, Bristol, Manchester Metropolitan and Kings College London found 13 per cent of children whose mothers did not experience domestic violence had an IQ of below 90 at eight years of age. If their mothers experienced physical violence from their partner either in pregnancy or during the first six years of the child's life, the figure rises to 22.8 per cent.

Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Dating and relationship violence a significant issue among young people in Wales
Dating and relationship violence (DRV), including both physical and emotional violence, is a significant issue among young people in Wales, academics say. Cardiff University researchers analysed survey data from nearly 75,000 students aged 11-16, from 193 schools in Wales. Of young people with dating experience, 17% of boys and 12% of girls said that they had experienced physical violence by a romantic partner at least once.

Social Sciences - 22.11.2019
Rare medieval manuscript telling the legend of Charlemagne discovered in Dundee
Rare medieval manuscript telling the legend of Charlemagne discovered in Dundee
Professor Marianne Ailes , a specialist in medieval French narrative poetry has identified rare fragments of the French poem Fierabras (composed c. 1200), recovered from a sixteenth-century binding in Dundee City Archives. The identification came about by a happy coincidence of circumstances when Dr Julian Luxford of St Andrews University came across the fragments when working in the archive.

Social Sciences - 21.11.2019
Women raised in deprived neighbourhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
Women who spend longer periods of their early lives in less affluent neighbourhoods are at greater risk of experiencing violence during their early adulthoods at the hands of their intimate partners, finds a new study published in Epidemiology . Intimate partner violence - physical, psychological, or sexual violence committed by a current or former partner - is the most common form of violence experienced by women worldwide.

Social Sciences - Politics - 21.11.2019
Growing diversity does not increase votes for anti-immigration candidates
Growing diversity does not increase votes for anti-immigration candidates
Donald Trump's anti-immigration views were a feature of his 2016 presidential campaign. To what extent was his unexpected victory driven by voters' anger over immigrants moving into their neighborhoods, attending their children's schools, or working in local businesses? Not at all, according to a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Gregory A. Huber.

Social Sciences - 21.11.2019
Women who spend their childhoods in deprived neighbourhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
Women who spend their childhoods in deprived neighbourhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
Intimate partner violence - physical, psychological, or sexual violence committed by a current or former partner - is the most common form of violence experienced by women worldwide. In the UK, an estimated 7% of women (approximately 1.1 million women) reported experiencing this violence in the last year alone according to the latest Crime Survey for England and Wales.

Social Sciences - 20.11.2019
Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?
The study published in PLOS ONE today [Wednesday 20 November] investigated whether the donation of personal data could be a publicly acceptable act to support the use of consumer personal data for academic research. The researchers developed a new questionnaire that measured individuals' motivations for donating data, which could be used in future research on data donation in different contexts, such as medical data.

Social Sciences - 20.11.2019
High school textbooks present social movements largely as a thing of the past
Social movements increasingly appear in textbooks worldwide - but more often as part of history and less as a form of contemporary citizenship. Education might be a powerful force for social change, but textbooks worldwide are more likely to present social movements as historical events than as a form of active citizenship, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE).

Health - Social Sciences - 19.11.2019
Depression puts South African girls at higher risk of contracting HIV
South African Actresses Khomotso Manyaka, right, and Keaoboka Makanyane, left, starred in the 2010 Oscar-nominated film "Life, above all," a drama about the impact of the impact of HIV-AIDS in their country. A new UC Berkeley-led analysis suggests that addressing the mental health needs of teen women in South Africa may help stem the spread of the disease.

Social Sciences - Health - 19.11.2019
Estimating undiagnosed abnormal heart rhythm cases in older adults
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a type of abnormal heart rhythm linked to higher risk of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke. A risk factor for AF is increasing age; however, it is unclear how many older adults likely have the condition. A new study from the University of Minnesota, led by recent School of Public Health graduate Mary Rooney, examined the prevalence of undiagnosed AF in thousands of older adults.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 18.11.2019
Among transgender children, gender identity as strong as in cisgender children
Among transgender children, gender identity as strong as in cisgender children
Children who identify as the gender matching their sex at birth tend to gravitate toward the toys, clothing and friendships stereotypically associated with that gender. Transgender children do the same with the gender they identify as, regardless of how long they have actually lived as a member of that gender.
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