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Veterinary Science



Results 1 - 5 of 5.


Veterinary Science - Health - 09.09.2019
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Researchers at the universities of Abuja and Nigeria, in collaboration with the University of Bristol, have detected a potentially human-infective microbe in pet dogs in Nigeria. Dogs in tropical Africa run the risk of contracting canine trypanosomosis if they are bitten by bloodsucking tsetse flies carrying trypanosomes - microscopic, single-celled organisms found in the bloodstream.

Veterinary Science - 20.08.2019
Sleeping unsafely tucked in to conserve energy in nocturnal migratory songbirds
Sleeping unsafely tucked in to conserve energy in nocturnal migratory songbirds
Sleeping with the head tucked in the back feathers is a common behavior exhibited by most species of birds. In a recent study, scientist from the Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Vienna found, that the hiding of the head during sleep reduces heat loss and conserves energy reserves. However sleeping with the head tucked is risky for the birds.

Veterinary Science - Health - 24.07.2019
7 tips to keep your dog safe from rats and fatal toxins
7 tips to keep your dog safe from rats and fatal toxins
University of Sydney experts are warning all dog owners in the inner city and the inner west to have their dog vaccinated against leptospirosis and to stay away from rat baits. 1. Get your dog vaccinatedá The current recommendation is for all dog owners in inner Sydney and the inner west to have their dog vaccinated at their local vet.

Veterinary Science - Psychology - 17.06.2019
Managing the risk of aggressive dog behaviour
Aggressive behaviour in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research by the University of Bristol has explored the factors that influence how owners manage aggressive behaviour in their dogs.

Veterinary Science - Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
Reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Why do zebras have stripes' A study published in PLOS ONE today [Wednesday 20 February] takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work. The evolution of the zebra's two-tone coat has intrigued scientists for over 150 years. Many theories have been proposed, including avoiding predators, better heat regulation and a social function, yet there is still no agreement between scientists.

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