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Results 41 - 60 of 223.


Chemistry - Physics - 07.11.2019
Invention of teeny-tiny organic films could enable new electronics
The first cell phone, released in 1983, was the size of a brick and weighed two-and-a-half pounds. The newest Apple Watch, released this fall, weighs 1.1 ounces. These kind of technological leaps have been made possible by finding new and inventive ways of combining materials, which can pack more information and circuitry into smaller and smaller packages.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 07.11.2019
Go With the Flow: Scientists Design Better Batteries for a Renewable Energy Grid
Go With the Flow: Scientists Design Better Batteries for a Renewable Energy Grid
New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind How do you store renewable energy so it's there when you need it, even when the sun isn't shining or the wind isn't blowing? Giant batteries designed for the electrical grid - called flow batteries, which store electricity in tanks of liquid electrolyte - could be the answer, but so far utilities have yet to find a cost-effective battery that can reliably power thousands of homes throughout a lifecycle of 10 to 20 years.

Physics - Chemistry - 07.11.2019
Team uses golden 'lollipop' to observe elusive interference effect at the nanoscale
Team uses golden ’lollipop’ to observe elusive interference effect at the nanoscale
Electrons in atoms are pretty talented. They can form chemical bonds, get kicked out of the atom and even "jump" to different locations based on their energetic states. In 1961, atomic physicist Ugo Fano theorized that electrons harbor another and unexpected talent: They can interfere with themselves as they simultaneously take two different quantum-mechanical paths.

Environment - Chemistry - 05.11.2019
Deep sea vents had ideal conditions for origin of life
By creating protocells in hot, alkaline seawater, a UCL-led research team has added to evidence that the origin of life could have been in deep-sea hydrothermal vents rather than shallow pools. Previous experiments had failed to foster the formation of protocells - seen as a key stepping stone to the development of cell-based life - in such environments, but the new study, published in  Nature Ecology & Evolution , finds that heat and alkalinity might not just be acceptable, but necessary to get life started.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 05.11.2019
UW-Madison chemist searches for ways to bioengineer proteins within cells
Andrew Buller , professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wants to add more building blocks to the body's protein-making kit. In nature, there exist 20 of these building blocks, called amino acids, which make up the proteins that perform the work required to sustain life. Buller says scientists can create more, allowing them to expand the ways in which cells build proteins.

Electroengineering - Chemistry - 05.11.2019
Scientists develop adhesive which can be unstuck in a magnetic field, reducing landfill waste
Researchers at the University of Sussex have developed a glue which can unstick when placed in a magnetic field, meaning products otherwise destined for landfill, could now be dismantled and recycled at the end of their life. Currently, items like mobile phones, microwaves and car dashboards are assembled using adhesives.

Environment - Chemistry - 04.11.2019
Homing in on pyrethroids
Homing in on pyrethroids
Very low concentrations of pyrethroid and organophosphate insecticides are effective in controlling pests on crops such as oilseed rape. However, if they enter surface waters, they also pose a high risk to aquatic organisms. In water quality monitoring, they have so far slipped through the net, since not only sample collection but also analytical procedures have to be specifically tailored to these compounds.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.11.2019
New MOF Can Take On Toxic Sulfur Dioxide Gas
New MOF Can Take On Toxic Sulfur Dioxide Gas
An international team has developed a robust material that can selectively take in toxic sulfur dioxide gas at record concentrations and preserve it for use in chemical production. The researchers verified its performance using a combination of techniques that included X-ray experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Advanced Light Source (ALS).

Chemistry - Environment - 29.10.2019
New hydrogen production method could support sustainable fuel creation
A new method of extracting hydrogen from water more efficiently could help underpin the capture of renewable energy in the form of sustainable fuel, scientists say. In a new paper, published today , researchers from universities in the UK, Portugal, Germany and Hungary describe how pulsing electric current through a layered catalyst has allowed them to almost double the amount of hydrogen produced per millivolt of electricity used during the process.

Chemistry - Physics - 22.10.2019
Münster University chemists create new types of Lewis acids
Münster University chemists create new types of Lewis acids
Researchers at the University of Münster have developed a method which makes it possible to create three-coordinate Lewis superacids on the basis of phosphorus. Previously, it had not been possible to isolate this type of compound, either in a liquid or in a solid state, due to its extreme electrophilicity and the associated reactivity.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.10.2019
Researchers gain new insights into the evolution of proteins
Researchers gain new insights into the evolution of proteins
How do bacteria manage to adapt to synthetic environmental toxins and, for example, to even develop strategies for using a pesticide and chemical warfare agent as food within less than 70 years' The evolutionary adaptations underlying such processes have now been studied in detail by an international team of researchers.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.10.2019
It takes two - a two-atom catalyst, that is - to make oxygen from water
The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth - reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust. Researchers say rust has long been seen as a potentially attractive material for solar water splitting, a key process that plants employ in photosynthesis.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.10.2019
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team led by Jani Kotakoski at the University of Vienna and Jannik Meyer at the University of Tübingen has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene. Direct images of the actual atoms and the analysis of Life as we know it is based on just a handful of different types of atoms (called elements), among them carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 21.10.2019
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
With a new process developed at TU Wien (Vienna), living cells can be integrated into fine structures created in a 3D printer - extremely fast and with very high resolution. Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework.

Chemistry - Environment - 17.10.2019
New catalyst helps turn carbon dioxide into fuel
New catalyst helps turn carbon dioxide into fuel
A new process shows promise in turning the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into usable fuels, and yields four times as much fuel as previous approaches. Imagine grabbing carbon dioxide from car exhaust pipes and other sources and turning this main greenhouse gas into fuels like natural gas or propane: a sustainability dream come true.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 17.10.2019
Ancient stars shed light on Earth’s similarities to other planets
Earth-like planets may be common in the universe, a new UCLA study implies. The team of astrophysicists and geochemists presents new evidence that the Earth is not unique. The study was published on Oct. 18. "We have just raised the probability that many rocky planets are like the Earth, and there's a very large number of rocky planets in the universe," said co-author Edward Young, UCLA professor of geochemistry and cosmochemistry.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.10.2019
How roots grow hair
How roots grow hair
The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.10.2019
Atomic force microscopy: new sensing element for high-speed imaging
Atomic force microscopy: new sensing element for high-speed imaging
Researchers at TU Wien have developed a new type of sensing element for atomic force microscopy, which enables a high measurement speed and can even image sensitive processes in living cells. High-definition images of minute objects are standard these days including the imaging of bacteria and viruses, and even molecules and individual atoms in extremely fine details.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 16.10.2019
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
A sample of estuarine mud taken 16 years ago has yielded a potential new class of painkiller as potent as opioids, but without their disadvantages. Researchers from The University of Queensland and University of Sydney have filed a patent application for the potential drug, which is a modified version of a molecule found in a Penicillium fungus, and published their results in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA .

Chemistry - 15.10.2019
Platinum breakthrough for cleaner and cheaper catalysts
Scientists have developed a new way of significantly reducing the amount of platinum used in catalysts, opening up a much cheaper and cleaner ways of producing a whole host of commodity chemicals and fuels. Though present in a whole host of catalysts used to speed up chemical reactions in industrial processes, platinum is an extremely expensive metal that produces harmful by-products.