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Results 61 - 80 of 223.


Pharmacology - Chemistry - 15.10.2019
Estuarine waters hold promise in global pain-relief hunt
In a world first, a team of Australian-led researchers has discovered a uniquely shaped fungus in pristine waters, which may mimic opioids with fewer side-effects. It had been hoped that such a molecular structure might exist. The worldwide search for an opioid alternative has made a leap forward - with a scientific discovery in an Australian fungus indicating effective pain relief and the potential for a safer less addictive drug, helping address the opioid epidemic of deaths by overdose.

Chemistry - 10.10.2019
Trash to Treasure: Scientists Convert Municipal Waste to Biofuel Precursors
Trash to Treasure: Scientists Convert Municipal Waste to Biofuel Precursors
As the need for energy security grows, scientists are investigating nonfood biomass sources that can be used to create valuable biofuels and bioproducts. Among these sources is municipal solid waste (MSW) - in other words, trash that's produced every day around the world in significant amounts. In a new study published in the journal ChemSusChem , researchers at Berkeley Lab created six blends that combined MSW items (non-recyclable paper and grass clippings) with biomass (corn stover and switchgrass).

Materials Science - Chemistry - 07.10.2019
Slow Decay
Slow Decay
"Corrosion" comes from Latin "corrodere": to gnaw something to pieces. This refers to the gradual destruction of a substance due to the influence of other substances in the environment. Specialists at Empa take a close look at such processes and can find timely ways to prevent material failure due to corrosion - long before disasters such as those in Genoa occur.

Chemistry - 04.10.2019
Professor Veronique Van Speybroek in 'Women of Catalysis'
Professor Veronique Van Speybroek in ’Women of Catalysis’
Prof. Van Speybroek highlighted as one of the strong Women of Catalysis The ChemCatChem journal, one of the premier journals in the field of catalysis, highlights the strong contributions of women-lead research groups in Catalysis Science. They placed 67 strong female researchers in the picture in a special issue: "Woman of Catalysis".

Chemistry - Physics - 04.10.2019
The fast dance of electron spins
The fast dance of electron spins
Chemists investigate the interactions of metal complexes and light Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 02.10.2019
Researchers identify molecular process that could accelerate recovery from nerve injuries
Twenty million Americans suffer from peripheral nerve injuries, which can be caused by traumas such as combat wounds and motorcycle crashes as well as medical disorders including diabetes. These injuries can have a devastating impact on quality of life, resulting in loss of sensation, motor function and long-lasting nerve pain.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 26.09.2019
Healthy organelles, healthy cells
Healthy organelles, healthy cells
It has recently become clear just how important membraneless organelles are for cells. Now biochemists at ETH Zurich have discovered a novel mechanism that regulates the formation of these organelles. This has laid the foundation for more targeted research into diseases such as Alzheimer's or ALS. For a long time, the contents of cells were thought to be fairly unstructured and chaotic: a mixture of proteins, DNA and a multitude of small metabolic molecules.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 24.09.2019
A battery with a twist
A battery with a twist
Markus Niederberger's team of researchers at ETH has used stretchable materials to develop a battery that can be bent, stretched and twisted. For applications in bendable electronic devices, this is precisely the kind of battery they need. Today's electronics industry is increasingly focusing on computers or smartphones with screens that can be folded or rolled.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.09.2019
2000 atoms in two places at once
2000 atoms in two places at once
The quantum superposition principle has been tested on a scale as never before in a new study by scientists at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the University of Basel. Hot, complex molecules composed of nearly two thousand atoms were brought into a quantum superposition and made to interfere.

Physics - Chemistry - 20.09.2019
New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields
New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields
Münster researchers combine nano-optics and organic chemistry to measure complex light landscapes in the tight focus of a laser beam / Study published in "Nature Communications" Structured laser light has already opened up various different applications: it allows for precise material machining, trapping, manipulating or defined movement of small particles or cell compartments, as well as increasing the bandwidth for next-generation intelligent computing.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 20.09.2019
Quality control in immune communication
Quality control in immune communication
The cells of our immune system constantly communicate with one another by exchanging complex protein molecules. A team led by researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now revealed how dedicated cellular control proteins, referred to as chaperones, detect immature immune signaling proteins and prevent them from leaving the cell.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.09.2019
A molecular bridge further
A molecular bridge further
Electronics built from molecules could open up new possibilities in the miniaturization of circuits in the future. Empa researchers, together with partners from Switzerland, the Netherlands, Israel, and the UK, succeeded in solving a crucial detail in the realization of such circuit elements: A molecular bridge for electrons that remains mechanically and electronically stable at room temperature.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 16.09.2019
Breakthrough in harnessing the power of biological catalysts
The power of nature could soon be used to create day-to-day materials such as paints, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in a much more environmentally friendly way, thanks to a new breakthrough from scientists at Cardiff University. The international team, led by the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, has successfully unlocked the catalytic abilities of enzymes taken from fungi by creating the perfect conditions needed for them to function.

Chemistry - Environment - 16.09.2019
Catalyst opens way to sustainable fuels from carbon dioxide
Catalyst opens way to sustainable fuels from carbon dioxide
A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device. If the idea of flying on battery-powered commercial jets makes you nervous, you can relax a little. Researchers have discovered a practical starting point for converting carbon dioxide into sustainable liquid fuels, including fuels for heavier modes of transportation that may prove very difficult to electrify, like airplanes, ships and freight trains.

Chemistry - Innovation - 16.09.2019
Measuring ethanol's deadly twin
Measuring ethanol’s deadly twin
ETH researchers have developed an inexpensive, handheld measuring device that can distinguish between methanol and potable alcohol. It offers a simple, quick method of detecting adulterated or contaminated alcoholic beverages and is able to diagnose methanol poisoning in exhaled breath. Methanol is sometimes referred to as ethanol's deadly twin.

Chemistry - Physics - 11.09.2019
From years to days: Artificial Intelligence speeds up photodynamics simulations
From years to days: Artificial Intelligence speeds up photodynamics simulations
Scientists use deep neural networks to achieve simulations on long time scales The prediction of molecular reactions triggered by light is to date extremely time-consuming and therefore costly. A team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna has now presented a method using artificial neural networks that drastically accelerates the simulation of light-induced processes.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.09.2019
Atomically thin micas as proton-conducting membranes
Inleiding: Recent work from CMT researchers (Dr Bacaksiz and Prof Peeters) provide theoretical support for experiments done in Manchester which show that micas are excellent proton conducting membranes. (Physworld News) One-atom thick materials like graphene (a 2D sheet of carbon) conduct protons extremely well but they become impermeable to protons the thicker they get.

Environment - Chemistry - 09.09.2019
New Investigation Cuts Through the Haze Surrounding
New Investigation Cuts Through the Haze Surrounding "Smoke-Free" Tobacco Products
Scientists find that the potentially harmful emissions from a trendy smoking alternative are comparable to electronic cigarettes A class of alternative tobacco product called heat-not-burn is quickly gaining in popularity across the globe. The product manufacturers claim that these battery-operated devices produce a "clean," nicotine-laden vapor that contains fewer irritant and carcinogenic chemicals than a conventional cigarette - and are therefore a less harmful option for tobacco users.

Chemistry - Innovation - 06.09.2019
Innovative method provides unique insights into the structure of cells and tissues
Innovative method provides unique insights into the structure of cells and tissues
Cells are the basic building blocks of life - and, as such, they have been the object of intense study since the invention of the optical microscope in the 17th century. The development of mass spectrometry (MS) methods - those which define the chemical composition of cells - represented a further milestone for research in the field of cell biology.

Chemistry - 06.09.2019
Making sustainable polymers from fragrant molecules
A way of making organic polymers from the fragrant molecules in conifers and fruit trees has been developed by scientists at the University of Birmingham. The technique, developed for 3D printing applications, could lead to a new generation of sustainable materials for use in biomedical applications or prototyping.