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Results 141 - 155 of 155.


Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.02.2019
Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
In order to understand the global carbon cycle, deep-sea exploration is essential, an international team led by geologists from Innsbruck concludes. For the first time, they succeeded in quantifying the amount of organic carbon transported into the deep sea by a single tectonic event, the giant Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.02.2019
Volcanic growth ’critical’ to the formation of Panama
It is a thin strip of land whose creation kick-started one of the most significant geological events in the past 60 million years. Yet for scientists the exact process by which the Isthmus of Panama came into being still remains largely contentious. In a new study published today in the journal Scientific Reports , scientists from Cardiff University have proposed that the Isthmus was born not solely from tectonic process, but could have also largely benefited from the growth of volcanoes.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 05.02.2019
Dark Fiber Lays Groundwork for Long-Distance Earthquake Detection and Groundwater Mapping
Dark Fiber Lays Groundwork for Long-Distance Earthquake Detection and Groundwater Mapping
Berkeley Lab researchers capture a detailed picture of how earthquakes travel through the Earth's subsurface In traditional seismology, researchers studying how the earth moves in the moments before, during, and after an earthquake rely on sensors that cost tens of thousands of dollars to make and install underground.

Earth Sciences - Health - 28.01.2019
New method to determine how safe buildings are after an earthquake
New method to determine how safe buildings are after an earthquake
EPFL scientists have developed a new method for evaluating building safety after an earthquake, helping residents return to their homes more quickly. Deciding when it's safe for a building's residents to move back in after an earthquake is a major challenge and responsibility for civil engineers. Not only do they have to evaluate whether the building could collapse, but also whether it could withstand aftershocks of the same magnitude.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 23.01.2019
An equipment facility for natural hazards research
After a natural disaster, researchers often want to collect information about what happened so that they can improve infrastructure and community resilience in the future. A center housed at the University of Washington, which opened its doors Sept. 1, offers a new way for these scientists to get their hands on state-of-the-art equipment to study the effects of natural disasters.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.01.2019
Q&A: Designing a better local tsunami warning system
New research outlines a more accurate and consistent way to warn coastal residents when and where tsunami waves are likely to hit. On a Friday afternoon in the spring of 2011, the T'hoku-Oki earthquake shook northeastern Japan for six minutes and shifted the country's main island by 8 feet. Minutes later, residents began receiving tsunami warnings through broadcast media, mobile phones and sirens.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science - 16.01.2019
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Technologies like artificial intelligence, sensor networks and advances in mapping are driving the work Amy Akmal The 1994 Northridge earthquake was one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. Fifty-seven people died, more than 8,700 were injured, and property damages amounted to billions of dollars.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2019
For 35 years, the Pacific Ocean has largely spared West's mountain snow from effects of global warming
For 35 years, the Pacific Ocean has largely spared West’s mountain snow from effects of global warming
A new study has found that a pattern of ocean temperatures and atmospheric circulation has offset most of the impact of global warming on mountain snowpack in the western U.S. since the 1980s. The study from Oregon State University, the University of Washington and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was published Jan.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2019
New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe
New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe
New research, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the eating habits of Neolithic people living in southeastern Europe using food residues from pottery extracts dating back more than 8,000 years. With the dawn of the Neolithic age, farming became established across Europe and people turned their back on aquatic resources, a food source more typical of the earlier Mesolithic period, instead preferring to eat meat and dairy products from domesticated animals.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.01.2019
UW research instrument returns from 22,000-mile seaward journey
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 1/15/19 × A portable research lab known as SPARCLET, developed at UW-Madison, traveled aboard the research vessel Thomas G. Thompson for two months to aid in a study aimed at better understanding how pollutants and turbulent conditions over the Philippine Sea affect the region and influence global weather.

Earth Sciences - 09.01.2019
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland
The nutrient cycles that underpin how carbon is stored and released from two of Greenland's glaciers is significantly affected by subglacial weathering, a new study has found, shedding further light on the geochemistry of meltwaters. The study, led by a team of isotope geochemists and glaciologists from the University of Bristol, measured the geochemical signature of the silica released from the Leverett Glacier in Southwest Greenland and the Kiattuut Sermiat in South Greenland.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 07.01.2019
Mars 2020 - geology and the conquest of space
Cathy Quantin-Nataf, Gilles Dromart and Gilles Montagnac of the Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon (LGL-TPE) are members of a research team developing one of the instruments that will go aboard the rover of the Mars 2020 Mission: the SuperCam. Watch live as NASA's next rover, Mars 2020, is built and tested in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science - 03.01.2019
Q&A: Creating a
Q&A: Creating a "Virtual Seismologist"
Understanding earthquakes is a challenging problem-not only because they are potentially dangerous but also because they are complicated phenomena that are difficult to study.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 02.01.2019
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A "pacemaker" for North African climate
Study shows the Sahara swung between lush and desert conditions every 20,000 years, in sync with monsoon activity. The Sahara desert is one of the harshest, most inhospitable places on the planet, covering much of North Africa in some 3.6 million square miles of rock and windswept dunes. But it wasn't always so desolate and parched.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 02.01.2019
Searching for the lost ships of Cortés
Divers with the research team explore the centuries-old anchor located off the coast of Mexico. Photo: Jonathan Kingston/National Geographic Image Collection Divers with the research team explore the centuries-old anchor located off the coast of Mexico. Photo: Jonathan Kingston/National Geographic Image Collection The discovery of a centuries-old anchor may help a UM researcher find the fleet the Spanish conquistador scuttled before conquering Mexico.